valley fever

Health
5:38 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

New Legislation Would Allocate $1 Million For Valley Fever Research

Some experts say drought conditions may increase the risk of valley fever in California.
Credit Valley Public Radio

The fight against valley fever may reach a new milestone. A bill in the state legislature would fund research for this disease in hopes of finding a cure. 

The bill introduced by State Senator Jean Fuller, R-Bakersfield, would allocate $1 million to fund research into a valley fever vaccine. Valley fever- also known as coccidioidomycosis- cases have increased dramatically over the last decade, including in the Central Valley. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says nearly 9,500 cases were reported nationwide in 2013.

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Health
5:21 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

ACLU Claims New Detention Center Could Expose Immigrants To Valley Fever

The detention center, a former prison, is expected to house up to 300 men and 100 women who are awaiting their final outcome of their immigration proceedings.
Credit Diana Aguilera / Valley Public Radio

  Advocates say moving people to the new facility in Bakersfield is raising serious concerns about the risk of exposing immigrants to valley fever. This disease is caused by a fungus that thrives throughout the Central Valley and parts of the Southwest, sending out spores. 

Julia Mass is with the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Northern California.

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Health
12:32 pm
Fri January 30, 2015

California Prison Leaders To Move Inmates Due To Valley Fever

About 1,350 inmates at Avenal State Prison and 815 inmates at Pleasant Valley State Prison must be moved out because they may be at risk of catching Valley Fever.
Credit CA Department of Corrections

More than 2,100 California inmates will have to be moved from two Central Valley prisons because they may be susceptible of contracting valley fever.

Results from skin tests conducted earlier this month showed an additional 3,050 inmates have already been exposed to the potentially deadly illness.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation will move the inmates from Avenal and Pleasant Valley state prisons but officials are still determining where the inmates will be transferred to.

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Health
5:45 pm
Mon January 12, 2015

California Tests Inmates For Valley Fever

Valley Fever is an infection caused by the fungus Coccidioides which is common in the soil in the Central Valley.
Credit Craig Kohlruss / The Fresno Bee

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is spending more than $5 million dollars to test around 90,000 inmates for the potentially deadly illness. The goal is to reduce number of infections, and determine who can be housed at both Avenal and Pleasant Valley Prisons.

The results from the newly available skin test will reveal who is at a higher risk of catching Valley Fever and who is not. Those found to be in high-risk groups will not be transferred to the two prisons.

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Health
5:54 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

FDA Puts Valley Fever On Key Funding List

Valley Fever is an infection caused by the fungus Coccidioides which is common in the soil in the Central Valley.
Credit Craig Kohlruss / The Fresno Bee

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that it will include the fungus that causes valley fever on a list of pathogens eligible for federal research funding.

Experts like John Galgiani from the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the University of Arizona say the move will aid in the development of drugs to treat the disease.

"It's another example of increasing recognition of the importance of this problem," Galgiani said. "And repeated recognition can only help but identify this as an unmet need deserving of further funding."

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Health
2:57 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

In California, Researchers Uncertain If Drought Will Increase Valley Fever Risk

Wit the right 'grow and blow' conditions, valley fever might thrive after a drought, experts say.
Rebecca Plevin Valley Public Radio

This year, you’re likely to hear a lot of predictions about how the drought will impact our health, environment, and food.

But one thing you won’t hear is whether the dry conditions will – without a doubt - increase the risk of valley fever in California. Sure, it makes sense. Even microbiologist Antje Lauer expects that drought conditions, and drier soil, would increase the risk of valley fever.

“If we want to have less of the valley fever fungus in the soil, you would pray for more rain,” Lauer says. 

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Valley Edition
3:58 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

On Valley Edition: Congressman David Valadao; Valley Fever; M Street Art Complex

The M Street Arts Complex will host events as well as house artists work in studios.
Credit M Street Arts Complex

    

This week on Valley Edition we take a look at the issues of immigration, high speed rail and agriculture in an interview with Republican Congressman David Valadao. 

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Health
12:01 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Universities Seek Public Input During 'Valley Fever Research Day'

The UCSF Fresno Center for Medical Education and Research will host Valley Fever Research Day.
UCSF Fresno

This Saturday, community members are invited to attend Valley Fever Research Day at the UCSF Fresno Center for Medical Education and Research. The event is an opportunity for researchers from UCSF Fresno, UC Merced, and Fresno State to connect with community members who have been impacted by the disease.

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Inside FM89
3:54 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

Valley Public Radio Project Earns Mention In Columbia Journalism Review

When Valley Public Radio and other Central California media started reporting on valley fever last fall, the disease was commonly overlooked by medical professionals and government agencies. But as the Reporting on Health Collaborative – which includes KVPR and six other print and radio outlets in English and Spanish – began publishing more than 50 stories and blog posts, health and political leaders began taking notice.

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Health
2:41 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Professor: To Gain Attention, Valley Fever Needs Passionate Advocates, Stronger Name

Barron Lerner, an author and faculty member at NYU Langone Medical Center, says valley fever groups should use publicity to explain that they disease can be worse than it sounds.
NYU Langone Medical Center

This week, the leaders of the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are joining leading doctors, researchers, lawmakers, and area residents at a two-day symposium on valley fever in Bakersfield. Experts and patients say the meeting is an opportunity to shine a light on the chronically overlooked and misdiagnosed fungal disease.

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Valley Edition
12:41 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

On Valley Edition: High Speed Rail; Valley Fever Symposium; Food Documentary; Fresno Philharmonic

Credit Fresno Metro Ministries

This week on Valley Edition we take a look at a few issues impacting the region. Valley Public Radio Reporter Ezra David Romero reports on how the implementation of High Speed Rail will force businesses and residents along its path to relocate. Fresno Bee Reporter Tim Sheehan joins Valley Edition Host Joe Moore for an update on the statewide project.

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Health
10:11 am
Tue September 24, 2013

NIH, CDC Announce Clinical Trial On Valley Fever

National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins describes the valley fever clinical trial during a two-day symposium on the disease in Bakersfield.
Henry Barrios The Bakersfield Californian

The National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will undertake a clinical trial to learn more about valley fever, agency leaders announced Monday at the start of a two-day symposium on valley fever, hosted by Bakersfield Congressman Kevin McCarthy.

"There are so many things we don't know about valley fever, and the best way to get the answers is to run a clinical trial," said National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins.

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Just One Breath
9:55 am
Mon September 23, 2013

'Unprecedented' Meeting Focuses On Valley Fever

Congressman Kevin McCarthy is hosting a symposium on valley fever in Bakersfield.
Office of Congressman Kevin McCarthy

Kings County health officer Dr. Michael MacLean uses one word to sum up this week’s valley fever symposium: 'Unprecedented.'

He says it’s a big deal that the leaders of the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health are gathering in Bakersfield to focus their attention on an orphan disease that mainly affects the southwestern United States.

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Just One Breath
6:03 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Valley Fever Symposium Aims To Spark Search For Vaccine, Awarness

In his mid-20s, Shane Hoover started planning for his death.

Hoover was diagnosed with valley fever, which is caused by inhaling fungal spores that grow in the soil, in 2010. He took medications for a while that kept it at bay. But he says he could not afford to keep paying for the drugs and, when he stopped, the disease intensified.

“He’d say, ‘I feel my body shutting down. I feel like it’s just a war inside of me that I can’t win,’” his mother, Kathleen Birks, said. “Our conversations became, ‘What do you want me to do with you when you die?’”

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Just One Breath
6:03 am
Sat September 21, 2013

Valley Fever Movement Could Learn from Health Success Stories

7-year-old Emily Gorospe reads from a handwritten note describing how valley fever has changed her life, at a town hall event in Bakersfield last year hosted by state Sen. Michael Rubio.
Joe Moore Valley Public Radio

When experts and policymakers from the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention land in Bakersfield next week, they will be met by many smart, well-meaning individuals hoping for better treatments for valley fever and, ultimately, for a cure.

But they won’t be met by a movement.

Despite its severe toll in California’s Central Valley and other hot spots, valley fever has remained overlooked and underfunded for decades. The absence of a strong patient advocacy movement has contributed to the chronic neglect, experts say.

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Environment
10:39 am
Tue August 13, 2013

How Will Global Warming Impact the San Joaquin Valley?

Rising global temperatures aren’t just an international concern, they’re also an important local issue, especially when it comes to public health. How will climate change affect everything from rates of asthma and valley fever to wildfires and natural disasters?

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Just One Breath
6:41 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Congressional Task Force to Aid Valley Fever Fight

Credit Designed by ReportingonHealth.org graphic artist, Claudia Delgado

Republican Congressman Kevin McCarthy made another move in his crusade against valley fever Wednesday, announcing the new “Congressional Valley Fever Task Force.”

The panel is comprised of 11 Republicans and three Democrats from California, Arizona and Texas. McCarthy said the group grew out of meetings he’s had throughout the year with Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., who will co-chair the task force.

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Health
4:30 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Class Action Lawsuit Filed On Behalf of Inmates With Valley Fever

A class action lawsuit on behalf of inmates at two Central Valley prisons was filed in U.S. District Court.
Credit Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

 

Lawyers representing inmates at Pleasant Valley State Prison in Fresno County and Avenal State Prison in Kings County filed a class action lawsuit in U.S. District Court Tuesday.

The suit is on behalf of black, elderly, and immune-compromised inmates who acquired valley fever since July 2009, while serving time at the two institutions.

The complaint alleges that state and prison officials knew these groups were at high-risk of contracting the serious, potentially fatal form of the disease, but failed to take adequate steps to protect them.

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Valley Edition
11:37 am
Tue June 25, 2013

On Valley Edition: Valley Fever in Prisons; Valley Politics; Shakespeare In The Park; Karen Marguth

Karen Marguth and her impromptu band perform Thursday nights at The Landmark in Fresno's Tower District.
Credit Ezra Romero / Valley Public Radio

On this weeks show, Valley Public Radio's Rebecca Plevin reports that within 90 days all inmates at risk of catching valley fever in Central California prisons must be relocated. Also on Valley Edition, host Joe Moore chats with Fresno Bee Editorial Page Editor Bill McEwen about local and state politics.

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Health
7:56 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Federal Judge: Move Inmates At Risk Of Valley Fever

Of all the state's prisons, Pleasant Valley in Coalinga has the highest rate of valley fever.
Rebecca Plevin Valley Public Radio

All inmates at risk of developing a serious form of valley fever must be removed from two Central California state prisons within the next 90 days. That’s what a U.S. District Court judge ruled Monday, upholding a directive from the federal official in charge of prison health care. The ruling comes over the objections of the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, which balked at the complexity of the policy. Valley Public Radio’s Rebecca Plevin takes us behind the prison gates to explain how the state and inmates are coping with the problem. 

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