Kerry Klein/KVPR

With Water, One Era Ends And Another Begins In East Porterville

In 2014, Governor Jerry Brown declared a drought state of emergency as wells across the state began to run dry. This just two years after California became the first state to legally recognize water as a human right. And yet, thousands of residents remain without water, as the state estimates 2,000 wells have run dry. While temporary relief has come to many, permanent relief has still been slow to arrive. Last Friday, a solution finally came to one of Tulare County’s hardest hit communities...
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Courtesy of Alison Sheehey

Thousands Of Feral Lime Green Parakeets Call Bakersfield Home

Bakersfield is known for agriculture, country music and oil. But what if I told you people are flocking to Kern County to birdwatch? Well it’s the truth and as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports they’re looking for a bird nonnative to the region that calls the city’s tall palm trees home. Earlier this summer I was doing some internet sleuthing about how to take better care of my pet parakeets. As I scrolled through search results a line jumped off the screen. There’s a wild population of...
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Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Is It Time For Farmworkers To Receive Overtime Like Other Hourly Workers In California?

At harvest time each year many farmworkers around the state work 16 hours a day and sometimes seven days a week. Long hours with little time to recover mean aching muscles and few hours for family. On Monday the California Senate approved a bill that hopes to change that by extending overtime rules to those who work in the fields. But as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports the bill is also a big source of controversy. Earlier this summer California lawmakers voted down a bill to give farmworkers...
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Kerry Klein/KVPR

Tree Die-Offs Won’t Increase Wildfire Risk, Expert Says

In the Sierra Nevada, it’s estimated that tens of millions of trees have died as a result of drought, many of which succumbed to infestations from bark beetles. As a result, we’ve been told our risk of wildfire is far higher than normal, but FM89’s Kerry Klein says the science doesn’t necessarily agree. Gaze across a hillside at 5,000 feet in the Sierra Nevada, and that landscape, usually a wash of green pines, firs and cedars, is probably smudged with reds and browns. “You're looking at,...
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Community Water Center

White House Honors Tulare County Water Advocate

When we talk about water in the San Joaquin Valley, it’s often to highlight water problems, like dry wells, contaminated drinking water or, more recently, toxic algae in lakes and reservoirs. But the news isn’t all bad: local advocate Susana De Anda recently received an award from the White House for her work bringing clean water to San Joaquin Valley communities. She's the co-director and co-founder of the Community Water Center, a non-profit that lobbies policymakers, pursues grants and...
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Kelly Slater Wave Company

Catching Waves In Lemoore? Pro Surfers Ride The Perfect Wave

Late last year a world famous surfer announced he created the perfect manmade wave. At this point no one knows exactly how he did it and the site where he built it isn’t open to the public. But Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero found that wave site in the most unlikely of places. Eleven time world champion surfer Kelly Slater dropped a bomb last December when he released a video of an 8-foot manmade wave in what looks like an old ski pond nowhere near an ocean. “This is our little...
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On Valley Edition

Bakersfield Blaze Facebook

Interview: It's A Sad Week For Bakersfield Baseball

Minor League Baseball has been a tradition in Bakersfield for over 75 years. But it looks like it’s a tradition that will soon come to an end. The California League announced Monday that the Bakersfield Blaze will be contracted – eliminated from the league at the end of the season. The move caps three decades of speculation and rumors about the fate of the team and its beleaguered home Sam Lynn Ballpark. But is minor league baseball gone for good? Zach Ewing, sportswriter with the Bakersfield...
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Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

Is A New Medical School The Answer To The Valley's Doctor Shortage?

Have you ever called your doctor or hospital seeking an appointment and been told the wait will be weeks or maybe months? You have been affected by the Central Valley’s doctor shortage. Now more than one group is pushing a potential solution, locally sourced doctors from a new medical school. Being in a waiting room at the doctor’s office isn’t the most pleasant place to be. But waiting to get into that waiting room can be even worse. That is what health care experts call a ‘doctor shortage’...
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Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Valley Public Radio Moves Into New Home

After many seasons of planning and fundraising, a year of design work and another year of construction Valley Public Radio moved into its new home in Clovis on May 19th. The 10,500 foot state-of-the-art broadcast center is located at the corner of Temperance and Alluvial Avenues in the Portal Sierra Research and Technology Park. The project includes new broadcast studios for the station, more than doubling the studio space when compared with the station's old home. While station operations...
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Inside FM89

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Technology Makes FM89's New Home More Flexible, Efficient

Valley Public Radio’s new home isn’t just an impressive piece of architecture, it’s also opening up new doors for the station’s programming thanks to state-of-the-art broadcasting technology. Unlike the station’s old home, the new building is designed from the ground up for digital broadcasting and data storage and delivery. Fiber optic lines allow for the station to receive programming from NPR and other producers over the internet, in addition to satellite delivery of programming. Over five...
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New Season Of Invisibilia Comes To FM89 June 17

Invisibilia is Latin for "invisible things." The program explores the unseen forces that shape human behavior -- things like ideas, beliefs, assumptions and emotions -- interweaving narrative storytelling with scientific research that will ultimately make you see your own life differently. The show is co-hosted by a trio of NPR's award-winning journalists, Alix Spiegel, Lulu Miller and Hanna Rosin, who have roots at This American Life, Radiolab and The Atlantic. In the first season,...
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This week on Valley Edition: Austin Quarry; Bakersfield Baseball; Dulce UpFront; East Porterville

Life In the Valley

Kerry Klein/KVPR

My Valley, My Story: Local Painter Uses Art to Explore Her “Bracero” Heritage

Right now, Clovis Community College is hosting an exhibit from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. It’s all about the Bracero program, a controversial government campaign in the mid-20th century that brought Mexican men into the U.S. seasonally to work the fields. Alongside the Smithsonian exhibit are paintings by Eliana Soto, a local artist whose grandfather was a Bracero. She tells Kerry Klein about exploring her family’s history through art as part of our first-person...
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