Inside FM89

Information about Valley Public Radio, station programs, events and personalities.

Valley Public Radio Moves Into New Home

Jun 16, 2016
Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

After many seasons of planning and fundraising, a year of design work and another year of construction Valley Public Radio moved into its new home in Clovis on May 19th. The 10,500 foot state-of-the-art broadcast center is located at the corner of Temperance and Alluvial Avenues in the Portal Sierra Research and Technology Park. The project includes new broadcast studios for the station, more than doubling the studio space when compared with the station's old home.

Invisibilia is Latin for "invisible things." The program explores the unseen forces that shape human behavior -- things like ideas, beliefs, assumptions and emotions -- interweaving narrative storytelling with scientific research that will ultimately make you see your own life differently. The show is co-hosted by a trio of NPR's award-winning journalists, Alix Spiegel, Lulu Miller and Hanna Rosin, who have roots at This American Life, Radiolab and The Atlantic.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Valley Public Radio’s new home isn’t just an impressive piece of architecture, it’s also opening up new doors for the station’s programming thanks to state-of-the-art broadcasting technology.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

With the station's move-in date about a month away, workers are busy installing things like carpet, furnishings and acoustic treatments. On Wednesday March 16 crews began installing carpet in portions of the building, while the station's IT and radio engineering teams worked on outfitting the technology center with equipment racks and other gear. Sound rated doors have been installed in the studio spaces, and in the lobby, lighting and furniture have been installed. Check back soon for more updates as work on the building is progressing quickly at this point. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A sleek monopole tower now rises 70 feet above Valley Public Radio's new broadcast center in Clovis. The tower holds an antenna that relays the station signal to the KVPR 89.3 transmitter in the mountains above Auberry. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

The smell of fresh paint and the sound of workers installing glass are filling FM89's new broadcast center these days, as the project is nearing completion. After breaking ground back in May of 2015, the construction process is nearing an end. Workers with Zumwalt Construction estimate that the building will be substantially complete in early March, allowing us to begin our move in April. 

Look up when you visit Valley Public Radio's new Barmann-Chaney performance studio and you'll see beams. While they aren't structural, they're there for an important reason - acoustics.

A big part of the process of building a radio station is involved with the issue of sound and acoustic design. An ideal studio environment is both isolated from noise of the outside world or adjacent studios, and also has a good sound of its own, not too "live" and not too "dead" - acoustically speaking. 

RTNA

The Radio & Television News Association of Southern California has honored Valley Public Radio with two prestigious "Golden Mike" awards. The station received the honors in Los Angeles Saturday night at the organization’s 66th annual gala at the Universal City Hilton. 

Workers Start Applying Stucco To KVPR's New Home

Jan 14, 2016
Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

On Thursday workers started applying stucco to the exterior of the building. This is a big milestone for the project as it signals that completion is getting much closer. It also is important for another reason - the weather. The recent break in the El Nino-driven rains that have hit the valley gave the building just enough time to dry out for workers to start applying the stucco.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

It may be the holidays, but workers are still busy out at the jobsite this week. Tyvek is being applied to the plywood skin of the building, as workers get ready to prep the walls for stucco. Also window frames are being installed on the exterior, which marks a big visual change for the building. 

Pages