history

Books
7:13 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

New Biography Paints Complex Picture Of Cesar Chavez

Miriam Pawel's new book "The Crusades of Cesar Chavez"

Charismatic,  controversial, courageous and complicated. Those are just a few words that could sum up the life of the late civil rights leader and farm labor activist Cesar Chavez. Now over 20 years after his death, a new biography seeks to provide fresh insight into a man who is an inspiration for millions. The book is called “The Crusades of Cesar Chavez” by Miriam Pawel, who joined us on Valley Edition to talk about Chavez the man and Chavez the myth. 

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Government & Politics
9:40 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Here And Gone: Fight Over Fresno's Cesar Chavez Boulevard Remains Fresh, 20 Years Later

Cesar Chavez
Credit Cesar Chavez Foundation

In October of 1993, the Fresno City Council voted to rename three city streets - Kings Canyon, Ventura and California - in honor of the late farm labor activist Cesar Chavez. The move was part of a campaign by local Latino groups who sought to honor the UFW founder, who had died earlier that year. 

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History
11:43 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Memories Of Bakersfield's Underground "Tunnels" Remain Vivid

Tegler Hotel building in downtown Bakersfield is one of the sites old-timers recall as being part of a network of connected basements or "tunnels"
Credit Joe Moore / Va

Deep beneath the oldest part of Bakersfield lies a hidden world, unknown to most, and forgotten by many. Yet some still have vivid memories of these underground passages or "tunnels" as some people describe them. 

These connected basements, and the activities that took place "underground" - gambling, brothels, blue movies, are not just the stuff of legend, they're still very real in the minds of many older Kern County residents.

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Community
8:52 am
Tue October 29, 2013

High Speed Rail Archaeologists Search For Fresno's 'Underground' Chinatown

Kathy Omachi leads a tour of Fresno's underground Chinatown in 2007. She claims this door is an entrance to a tunnel.
Joe Moore Valley Public Radio

Generations of Fresno residents have heard stories about the mysterious underground world of Fresno's 19th century Chinatown. Was it a world of illicit activity, with a network of subterranean tunnels? Archeologists with the state's high speed rail authority are hoping to shed some new light on this dark and forgotten part of Fresno's history. 

Last week archeologists gathered in Fresno’s historic Chinatown to sift through soil with a hope of unearthing century-old artifacts just yards from the future bullet train.

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Community
3:09 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Historic Fresno Arch May Move For High Speed Rail

The historic Fresno arch was contructed over Van Ness Avenue at Highway 99
Joe Moore Valley Public Radio

Up and down the valley, many cities have historic signs or archways which welcome visitors to town. Modesto's arch promotes a city filled with "Water Wealth Contentment and Health." Clovis proudly proclaims itself as the "Gateway to the Sierras," and Bakersfield makes a bold statement with its arch off of Buck Owens Boulevard. Fresno has its own historic archway, but as FM89's Joe Moore reports, it may soon need a new home.

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Valley History
2:12 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

How Jackie Robinson Almost Became A Fresno State Bulldog

Baseball great Jackie Robinson was recruited by Fresno State in 1939.
Credit http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/robinson/ / Library of Congress - public domain

Before he broke baseball's color barrier in 1947 for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Jackie Robinson nearly wound up as multi-sport star for the Fresno State Bulldogs.

In a move that would likely run afoul of today's NCAA recruiting regulations, the school offered the star a number of incentives in an attempt to lure Robinson to the campus, including a new set of tires for his aging 1931 Plymouth.

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Community
9:07 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Coalinga 'Deportee' Plane Crash Sparks Search, 65 Years Later

Carlos Rascon, director of cemeteries for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno walks past the grave of the 28 'deportees'
Rebecca Plevin Valley Public Radio

Author Tim Z. Hernandez was digging through old newspapers at the Fresno County library when a dramatic headline from the late 1940s captured his attention.

“I stumbled upon this headline that said, ‘100 people see a ship plunge to the earth’ or something like that. It was just really a captivating headline. I instantly realized after reading it that it had to be tied into Woody Guthrie’s song, says Hernandez. 

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Quality of Life
6:28 pm
Tue May 17, 2011

On Quality of Life: Diabetes; Local History

Segment 1: Diabetes - Californians spend $24 billion each year on diabetes care, and the Valley's diabetes rates are some of the highest in the state, around 10 percent. For people struggling with the disease, the financial and emotional burdens of diabetes make for a difficult combination. When the costs of diabetes testing supplies add up, some bypass the pharmacy and turn to the street to get what they need. On this edition of Quality of Life, correspondent Shellie Branco reports on how some Valley residents are dealing with their disease. And later, Dr.

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