Fresno

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Host Joe Moore speaks with The Guardian's Jon Swaine about the paper's series "The County" looking at police violence in Kern County. Also on the program KVPR's Diana Aguilera reports on the history of housing in Fresno County and how some people groups weren't allowed to buy in certain areas of Fresno. 

The Fulton Mall has been a source of controversy since before it was built decades ago. Last week, the Fresno City Council took what could be the final vote deciding its fate. But opponents says the fight is not over yet. In fact, there are still challenges facing the project.

At their most recent meeting, the Fresno City Council approved a $22,400,000 contract with American Paving to rip out the Fulton Mall and replace it with a street drawing cheers and applause from crowd of supporters.

City of Fresno

Construction on California’s high-speed rail project is set to give local drivers some headaches. Starting next month work will begin on the demolition of the Tuolumne Street bridge in downtown Fresno.

The bridge, which links Highway 99 with the central business district will eventually be replaced by a new higher bridge that will span both the union pacific and high speed rail tracks, and will accommodate 2-way traffic.

The Fresno City Council has voted 6-1 to accept a construction bid to turn the Fulton Mall back into a street. The vote is a significant, and nearly final step, in the long fight over what to do with the pedestrian walking mall in the middle of downtown Fresno.

The city hall was packed for the vote with many people wearing orange ‘I believe in Downtown Fresno’ tee-shirts appearing to greatly outnumber opponents of the project. Most of the supporters called on the council to remove the mall, which they consider a moribund drag on downtown development.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

In the wake of the ongoing crisis over code violations and gas leaks at the Summerset Village apartments, the Fresno City Council is set to debate a proposal Thursday/today that would make it easier to intervene with unresponsive landlords.

The bill would authorize the city to use a process known as receivership when dealing with properties with the most severe code violations and owners who are unresponsive. City planning director Jennifer Clark says the provision is a followup to last year’s effort to toughen laws about vacant blighted buildings.

Zoyer Zyndel

FM89's series My Valley, My Story features first person accounts from the lives of people throughout the San Joaquin Valley. This week reporter Diana Aguilera brings us the story of transgender activist Zoyer Zyndel. He talks about the struggles he's faced and his hopes for the valley's LGBTQ community. 

"I was assigned female at birth but I live my life as male. and so my sex did not correspond with my gender. Gender is a function of the brain and I've always saw myself in my brain as a male."

The Guardian

A new report from the British newspaper The Guardian says Kern County leads the nation when it comes to use of deadly force by law enforcement.

According to numbers published by the paper, 13 people have died this year in connection with the use of force by law enforcement in the county. That’s higher than the total for New York City, which has ten times the population.

Diana Aguilera / Valley Public Radio

It’s been more than two weeks since residents at a Fresno apartment complex have been living without heat. FM89’s Diana Aguilera visits the site and learns how residents are coping with the cold temperatures.

Ever since November 13 Amelia Padre and her 22-year-old daughter have been living in a nightmare. No hot water, no heat, and no natural gas to cook with.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we take an in depth look at the issues of life without heat for the residents of one Fresno based apartment complex. KVPR Reporter Diana Aguilera visits the complex and finds families in need. Fresno City Director of Communications and Public Affairs Mark Standriff joins the conversation as well as Faith in Communities Andy Levine

Diana Aguilera / Valley Public Radio

Up to 1800 residents living in an apartment complex in Fresno have been without heat or hot water after several gas leaks were discovered. FM89’s Diana Aguilera reports how long these residents could be without basic necessities.

Tenants at the Summerset Village Apartments have been without natural gas for 12 days. They can’t cook, they don’t have hot water, and the heaters don’t work. The majority are Southeast Asian refugees with many elderly and young residents.

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