drought

Ezra Davd Romero

FM89's series My Valley, My Story features first person accounts from the lives of people throughout the San Joaquin Valley. In this piece FM89’s Ezra David Romero visits the tiny town of Fairmead near Chowchilla in Madera County and meets an elderly couple grappling with water issues at their rural home. “My name is Joanne De Freitas . Almost two years ago our well started collapsing.” “We had Anderson pump come out and they were able to go down a little bit further, but our pump...

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Tulare County is ground zero for drought. More than 2,000 household wells have gone dry leaving families without water. The county has provided tanks and water to many homeowners, but as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports, officials says their hands are tied when it comes to providing the service to renters. The conversation at The Tulare County Board of Supervisors meeting this week centered on how to prevent around 200 rental homes in the region from being red tagged as uninhabitable. The...

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

The bark beetle has killed so many trees in the Sierra Nevada that officials are worried that people visiting places like the Sierra National Forest are in danger just by being there. Last week Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency when it comes to the dead trees and is asking for federal resources to remove them safely. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports from the Bass Lake area on what the Forest Service is doing to protect visitors. The area around Bass Lake Northeast of Fresno...

New York Times

For over 150 years, California has collectively embraced an identity as a place where people go to reinvent themselves and to remake the world. From the Gold Rush to the Silver Screen; from valleys of wheat and oranges to valleys of microprocessors and software – the Golden State’s story is one of innovation and riches, but also tension over what has been lost in the process of creating the future. With a new piece in the New York Times (My Dark California Dream), writer Daniel Duane suggests...

Valley Public Radio

On this week's Valley Edition: Governor Brown has declared a new state of emergency in California. But it’s not involving a wildfire or a mudslide – it’s actually about the massive die-off trees in the Sierra. We’ll find out what local forestry officials doing scrambling to keep visitors safe. Later in the show we’ll talk about a new opinion piece in the New York Times that suggests California’s best days are behind it. Is the California dream turning dark, or is the state about the reinvent...

NASA Study: California Drought Doubles Idle Farmland Acres

Oct 29, 2015
NASA

Farmers in California's Central Valley have left more than one million acres of agricultural land idle all year long. As Amy Quinton reports from Sacramento, that’s more than double the amount before the drought. NASA and USGS satellite imagery paints a bleak picture of the effect of the drought on farmland in the Central Valley. Fifteen percent of all irrigated farmland was idle all year long. Two million acres were idle during the summer season this year, when high value crops are usually...

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition the program begins with Political Junkie Ken Rudin speaking with VE Host Joe Moore about Kevin McCarthy and how he could become the next House Speaker. Later in the program FM89's Ezra David Romero reports on how storms brought by El Niño could create mountain flooding because of dirt that is scared of water. After the story Kathy Allison joins the show from Sierra National Forest where she is a lookout ranger. Allison talks about the Rough Fire and what it's like...

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Just a few decades ago Fresno used to be the center of the American Fig Industry, with orchards stretching for thousands of acres. Now most of the trees planted by J.C. Forkner almost 100 years ago are gone and are replaced by homes and shopping centers. Likewise California’s fig industry has undergone some big changes, but after years of struggles some growers hope that new food trends might provide a turnaround. That’s if the drought doesn’t cause them more problems. FM89’s Ezra David...

US Forest Service Prevents Its Own Scientists From Talking About Study

Sep 17, 2015
Courtesy of US Forest Service / InciWeb

The US Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station is preventing one of its scientists from talking about a study he authored in the journal “Science.” As Amy Quinton reports from Sacramento, the agency even unsuccessfully requested that Science editors hold the article or remove his name from the study. US Forest Service scientist Malcolm North authored the peer-reviewed article “Reform Forest Fire Management.” It says suppressing every fire in overgrown forests is not only expensive...

William Shewbridge, Creative Commons / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

The Rough Fire burning in California’s Sierra Nevada has consumed over 110,000 acres of forest. The blaze is now threatening a treasured grove of ancient trees. Firefighters in Kings Canyon National Park are clearing the area around the Grant Grove of Giant Sequoia trees as the Rough Fire burns miles away. Fire official Michael Johnson says while Giant Sequoias typically can endure fire, the state’s drought has stressed the forest. JOHNSON: “If you have an area of forest that has an...

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