Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Both Armen Bacon and Nancy Miller have shared the pain of losing a child to addiction. On this edition of Valley Writers Read, we hear them read their story, Griefland- An Intimate Portrait of Love, Loss and Unlikely Friendship.  They share the tragedy of their loss and how their grief helped build their friendship.

On this edition of Valley Writers Read, Christine Autrand Mitchell reads her story A Remarkable Tragedy, which tells how a family's life is changed by the sudden death of a father and son. Also this week, Howell Hurst reads Long Walk To the Showers, the story of a homeless man trying to rebuild his life.

On this edition of Valley Writers Read, Larry Warkentin reads his story, Are We There Yet?, a fictionalized tale about a group of Mennonites and their journey across the Atlantic to the New World.

This week on Valley Writers Read, we hear a story by Flora Beach Burlingame, called "A Teacher of the Freedmen." The story is a biography of the author's grandfather, John Stevenson, who volunteered to educate freed slaves after the Civil War.

On this edition of Valley Writers Read, we hear Jerry Fisher tell his story "Auf Wiedersehen, My Love" of a fictional World War II pilot who bails out over Germany, where he befriends a German woman and then is interned in a POW camp.

On this edition of Valley Writers Read, Margaret Garrett Irwin we hear Margaret Garret Irwin's story  "Margaret's War - Lots of Moving and Air Raids." You'll hear her recollections as a young girl growing up in London during World War II. Margaret recalls frightening air raids, the incendiary bomb and V2 rockets.

This week on Valley Writers Read, we will hear a story by local author Ed Miller, called "Lost Roads Going Nowhere." You'll hear the story of Slater, whose life is a downward spiral, with affairs, a divorce, addiction, prison and more.

On this edition of Valley Writers Read, author Hope Nisly recalls her childhood. Growing up with six cousins in a small Iowa town, Hope remembers the assassination of President Kennedy and the night on the couch following the shooting of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Twenty years ago this month, the hills of Kern County became the focus of the international art community, with the temporary installation of over a thousand giant yellow umbrellas along The Grapevine. Now, two decades later, while the umbrellas are long gone, the event remains fresh in the minds of many. FM89’s Joe Moore has this report. 

On this edition of Valley Writers Read, James Varner recalls the career of his uncle, Bakersfield's Claude Varner, the ex-Featherweight Boxing Champion of the world.

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