Valley Public Radio News

Hear local reports on the economy, government, education, health and the environment on Valley Public Radio during All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Valley Edition. 

Trump Campaign Resonates in Rural Sierra County

May 13, 2016

Voter turnout has been falling in California for years, but that’s not the case in the conservative northeastern part of the state. In rural Sierra County more than 85 percent of eligible voters are registered. And they cast their ballots, too — usually for Republicans.

Six community clinics in the region will be offering care to more people after receiving a new round of federal grants totaling more than $5.6 million.

The six clinics are located in San Diego, Riverside and Imperial counties. Collectively, the clinics treated more than 349,000 people in 2014.

They're members of the nonprofit Health Center Partners, a consortium of 17 community clinics in Southern California.

Kerry Klein/KVPR

Right now, Clovis Community College is hosting an exhibit from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. It’s all about the Bracero program, a controversial government campaign in the mid-20th century that brought Mexican men into the U.S. seasonally to work the fields. Alongside the Smithsonian exhibit are paintings by Eliana Soto, a local artist whose grandfather was a Bracero. She tells Kerry Klein about exploring her family’s history through art as part of our first-person series My Valley, My Story.

California Teachers Association President Eric Heins launches the campaign for a voter initiative that would extend the income tax increases on the rich at a news conference on Wednesday May 11, 2016, at California Middle School in Sacramento.
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

California Teachers Association President Eric Heins launches the campaign for a voter initiative that would extend the income tax increases on the rich at a news conference on Wednesday May 11, 2016, at California Middle School in Sacramento.

Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

Californians will likely decide this fall whether to extend the Proposition 30 income tax increases on the rich that voters approved in 2012.

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire. Learn more about PolitiFact California.

U.S. Rep. Loretta Sanchez, D-Calif., was asked to explain her 2005 vote to offer gun manufacturers liability protections during a debate in the U.S.Senate race.

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire. Learn more about PolitiFact California.

From left to right: Duf Sundheim, Kamala Harris, Loretta Sanchez, Ron Unz, Tom Del Beccaro at a debate at KPBS in San Diego, May 10, 2016.
Milan Kovacevic / KPBS

From left to right: Duf Sundheim, Kamala Harris, Loretta Sanchez, Ron Unz, Tom Del Beccaro at a debate at KPBS in San Diego, May 10, 2016.

Milan Kovacevic / KPBS

Claire Trageser | KPBS

The Fresno County Board of Supervisors is not accepting a study about possible development in a 5-thousand acre area along the San Joaquin River north of Fresno. Opponents saw the study as a first step toward commercial development along the river bottom.

The so-called ‘Friant Corridor Feasibility Study’ was intended to be a first look at potential places for development from the north edge of Fresno to the Community of Friant.

Kerncountylibrary.org

Public libraries are often seen as important pillars of knowledge and sources of civic pride. But in Kern County, they are struggling to keep their doors open. Now, voters have a chance to establish a dedicated funding stream for their libraries for the first time.

A June 7th vote on Measure F could be a test of community support for their library system.

At the Beale Memorial Library in Bakersfield, Seven-year-old Emmy Sperber practices her reading as her father Jason looks on.

Republicans in the California Legislature are sizing up their own campaigns now that businessman Donald Trump will be their party’s presidential nominee. And they’re hoping the old election cliché holds true that “all politics is local."

Neither Senate Minority Leader Jean Fuller (R-Bakersfield) nor Assembly Minority Leader Chad Mayes (R-Yucca Valley) have endorsed Trump yet.

Mayes, who previously endorsed Ohio Gov. John Kasich, even tweeted that he agreed with House Speaker Paul Ryan’s non-endorsement.

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