Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

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Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

This week on Valley Edition KVPR's Ezra David Romero reports from Kings County where a Southern California developer would like to build a high-tech city. FM89's Kerry Klein takes a look at Measure C and how the proposed bond may affect community colleges. Later in the program we hear from Alex Ott who would like to be Fresno County's newest addition to the Board of Supervisors. Ending the program VE Host Joe Moore leads a conversation about transportation and commuters.

Kerry Klein/KVPR

Residents of Bakersfield breathe some of the most polluted air in the nation, thanks to a confluence of vehicle exhaust, industrial operations, and stagnant valley air. In an effort to combat pollution, air quality advocates are now targeting a potential source of emissions that, at the moment, is not even operating.

Ride your bike along the Kern River just west of downtown Bakersfield, and you pass joggers and people walking dogs. To one side of the trail, families play Frisbee golf in the grass. To the other side, a symbol of Kern County’s economy looms silently.

Courtesty of https://www.facebook.com/magsigforsupervisor

City of Clovis Ex-Mayor Nathan Magsig has put his name in the hat to become a member of the Fresno County Board of Supervisors. On this week's Valley Edition Magsig joins Valley Edition Host Joe Moore for a discussion on why thinks he should be the newest Fresno County Supervisor. 

To listen to the interview click play above. 

http://www.artifactla.com/#/operationpopcorn/

It's estimated that around 30,000 Hmong people died helping the U.S. during the Vietnam War when the C.I.A. recruited Laotian Hmong to fight the communists. The first wave of Hmong refugees who emigrated to the U.S. grappled with survivors’ guilt and, for decades, agonized over human rights violations committed against those left behind, including attacks on unarmed civilians, rape, and torture.

Kerry Klein/KVPR

Right now, Clovis Community College is hosting an exhibit from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. It’s all about the Bracero program, a controversial government campaign in the mid-20th century that brought Mexican men into the U.S. seasonally to work the fields. Alongside the Smithsonian exhibit are paintings by Eliana Soto, a local artist whose grandfather was a Bracero. She tells Kerry Klein about exploring her family’s history through art as part of our first-person series My Valley, My Story.

This week on Valley Edition FM89's Jeffrey Hess reports on a new tax that could bring a boost to Kern County Libraries. We are also joined by Fresno Bee Journalists Barbara AndersonBoNhia Lee and Andrea Castillo to talk about their reporting on blight in Fresno.

Kyle Carter For Mayor

Twenty-five different people all want to become Bakersfield's next mayor. One of those hopefuls is Kyle Carter. 

Carter is former developer from Bakersfield. He's run multiple companies and serves as a trustee of the Kern Community College District. He has also played a pivotal role in creating The Bakersfield Music Hall of Fame. And now today he is trying his hand at mayor. He hopes to replace Mayor Harvey Hall. 

To listen to the interview click play above. 

  

Courtesy of The Fresno Bee

Black mold, collapsing ceilings, and units without heat in the middle of the winter – those are just some of the horrible conditions at the dilapidated Summerset Village Apartments last year.

Kerry Klein/KVPR

The state estimates that over a million Californians lack access to safe drinking water. After 15 years with arsenic contamination, one small Kern County community took the struggle for clean water into its own hands--in a campaign that could serve as a role model for others.

It’s recess at El Camino Real Elementary School in Arvin and the courtyard is packed. Kids play tag and tetherball, and laughter echoes throughout the yard.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition FM89's Kerry Klein reports on water challenges in the town of Arvin. We also hear from KVPR's Jeffrey Hess about a vote that could determine the future of Kaweah Delta Hospital in Visalia.

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