Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

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Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Oliver Baines has a unique perspective on the issue of Black Lives Matter and law enforcement. Currently the only African-American on the Fresno City Council, Baines also served around 12 years as an officer with the Fresno Police Department.  Speaking on Valley Public Radio’s Valley Edition Tuesday, Baines recalled his own experiences with racially biased policing, while pleading for calm and understanding in the wake of recent shootings and protests.  Baines said the often heated rhetoric from people on both sides of the issue serves to distract from the goal of racial reconciliation.

Kerry Klein / Valley Public Radio

It’s not every day that a musician from Fresno is honored by the National Endowment For the Arts with a prestigious national fellowship. But Bounxeung Synanonh one of the leading performers of the traditional Lao instrument the khaen recently received national recognition for his artistry from the group.

MAGGIE STARBARD / NPR

Dan Charles reports on agriculture for NPR. Over the past year he reported a series on farmworkers across the country. Recently he wrote a  post on NPR's food blog The Salt titled "Inside The Lives Of Farmworkers: Top 5 Lessons I Learned On The Ground." In this interview Valley Edition Host Joe Moore interviews Charles about this list and his reporting. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess explores why certain police shootings - like the shooting death of Dylan Noble - receive more attention than others. We also hear from Fresno City Councilmember Oliver Baines about his time as a police officer, his response to police involved shootings and more. Later FM89 Reporter Kerry Klein reports on the success of Fresno's needle exchange program. We also hear from NPR's Dan Charles about his latest article focusing on the five things he's learned while reporting on farmworkers.

Michael J Semas

Michael J. Semas has an interesting perspective into valley history thanks to his collection of thousands of rare postcards, many more than 100 years old. Real photo postcards captured everyday life in Central California, and in many cases, they may be the only images remaining of certain communities, people or buildings. 

Alicia Griffin/Kris Robinson / Flickr

Farmers markets are full of bright colored produce at this time of year. Think sweet stone fruit, tart berries and tomatoes of every color. People love tasty heirloom tomatoes but they can be hard to grow and they’re expensive. That’s why researchers want to create a stronger plant. They’re doing this using a new twist on an old technique.

Scott Stoddard is an expert when it comes to tomatoes. He plants rows and rows of the fresh-market crop on farms across Merced and Madera counties for the UC Cooperative Extension. 

Henry R. Perea - Facebook

Northeast Fresno's water problem - corroded residential pipes that have resulted in rusty water that in some cases contains lead - isn't just an issue for the residents involved, it's now the latest issue in the 2016 mayor's race. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess explores whether building a medical school in the Valley is the answer to the region's doctor shortage. We also hear from Fresno County Supervisor Henry Perea about water problems in North Fresno and more. FM89's Ezra David Romero reports a story about how simple science could help the tomato industry. Later we hear from the organizer of the Black Lives Matter protest in Fresno earlier this month.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Air quality is a tremendous problem in the San Joaquin Valley. Our air is consistently ranked the worst in the nation, alongside the Los Angeles area, and it’s been linked in Valley residents to immune problems, emergency room visits and even premature death. It’s an old problem, but local officials have put forth a bold new solution.

If it were winter, you could turn to the east from almost anywhere in the San Joaquin Valley and admire the snowy peaks of the Sierra Nevada mountains.

flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/legalcode

Fresno has many hidden gems. One of them is tucked away on Winery Avenue not far from the Fresno Airport. It's called The Discovery Center. It's here on Friday nights during June, July and August  that a local professor leads what he calls Star Parties

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