Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

Subscribe to our Valley Edition podcast...

Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we hear about the community of East Porterville being connected to The City of Porterville's water supply. We also hear from FM89's Jeffrey Hess about the ongoing galvanized pipe situation in Fresno.

Sierra Star Reporter Mark Evan Smith chats on the program about the disputed Austin Mine in Madera County. Later KVPR's Ezra David Romero reports a story on how Fresno County is at the center of Zika research and another story about a bill on agricultural overtime.

Bakersfield Blaze Facebook

Minor League Baseball has been a tradition in Bakersfield for over 75 years. But it looks like it’s a tradition that will soon come to an end.

The California League announced Monday that the Bakersfield Blaze will be contracted – eliminated from the league at the end of the season. The move caps three decades of speculation and rumors about the fate of the team and its beleaguered home Sam Lynn Ballpark. But is minor league baseball gone for good?

Zach Ewing, sportswriter with the Bakersfield Californian, joined Valley Edition to tell us more on the topic. 

Kerry Klein/KVPR

In 2014, Governor Jerry Brown declared a drought state of emergency as wells across the state began to run dry. This just two years after California became the first state to legally recognize water as a human right. And yet, thousands of residents remain without water, as the state estimates 2,000 wells have run dry. While temporary relief has come to many, permanent relief has still been slow to arrive. Last Friday, a solution finally came to one of Tulare County’s hardest hit communities—but it wasn’t easy, and it’s not the end.

http://www.noaustinquarry.org/map/

Drive north from Fresno along Highway 41 and you’ll see thousands of acres of rolling farmland. One day, those ranches, vineyards and orchards will become thousands of new homes.

It’s all part of an ambitious plan by developers and Madera County leaders to grow a major new city in the area. But building a city the size of Modesto takes a lot of materials, including things like gravel and concrete and asphalt.

Linguistics professors and students at Fresno State are hard at work on a mammoth task - saving the language of the Chukchansi tribe of Mono Indians. One thing makes their task especially difficult - there are only 12 speakers of the Chukchansi language left. We talked with professors Brian Agbayani and Niken Adisasmito-Smith about their work, and the challenges of not only documenting the language for posterity but also keeping alive and in active use. 

Kern High School District

It’s back to school season, and that means there’s a lot of news right now about local school districts. None more so than the Kern High School District, which serves more than 35,000 students in Kern County. Harold Pierce of the Bakersfield Californian joined us on Valley Edition to give us a recap of the latest news around KHSD.

Flickr user WBUR, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Right now in California’s Sierra Nevada, an estimated 66 million trees have died, due to a deadly combination of drought and bark beetles, which take advantage of dry, thirsty trees. But could we prevent beetles from ever attacking trees in the first place? Researchers have been asking this question for decades, and a new tool fends off bark beetles using the very thing that makes them so deadly.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

At harvest time each year many farmworkers around the state work 16 hours a day and sometimes seven days a week. Long hours with little time to recover mean aching muscles and few hours for family. On Monday the California Senate approved a bill that hopes to change that by extending overtime rules to those who work in the fields. But as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports the bill is also a big source of controversy.

Valley Public Radio

This week on the program KVPR's Jeffrey Hess reports how Valley communities are trying find the right balance on public safety taxes. We also hear from KVPR's Kerry Klein on a goo that prevents bark beetle from killing trees. Later we chat about Fresno County's new program Cradle to College with Linda Gleason and Eric Cederquist the superintendent for Fowler schools.

Courtesy of Alison Sheehey

Bakersfield is known for agriculture, country music and oil. But what if I told you people are flocking to Kern County to birdwatch? Well it’s the truth and as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports they’re looking for a bird nonnative to the region that calls the city’s tall palm trees home.

Earlier this summer I was doing some internet sleuthing about how to take better care of my pet parakeets. As I scrolled through search results a line jumped off the screen. There’s a wild population of parakeets living Bakersfield.

Pages