Morning Edition

Weekday mornings 3:00 a.m. till 9:00 a.m.

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. These hosts often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel around the world to report on the news firsthand.

It's family vacation time, and I've taken the kids back to where I grew up — a small plot of land off a dirt road in Kansas.

For my city kids, this is supposed to be heaven. There are freshly laid chicken eggs to gather, new kittens to play with and miles of pasture to explore.

But we're not outside.

I'm sitting in my childhood bedroom watching my 7-year-old son and his 11-year-old-cousin stare at a screen. The older kid is teaching the younger the secrets of one of the most popular games on Earth: Minecraft.

Federal regulators are looking to place tighter controls on the export of cyberweapons following the megabreaches against the Office of Personnel Management and countless retailers.

The Commerce Department wants to ensure that software that can attack a network — the kind that can break in, bypass encryption and steal data — can't be shipped overseas without permission. But the cybersecurity industry is up in arms.

How Should Republicans Deal With Donald Trump?

Jul 20, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

David. Hey, David.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yeah?

MONTAGNE: What am I - what am I thinking?

GREENE: (Laughter) I have no idea. I'm not a mind reader.

You could see being upset if you came to a concert to hear a band — and they suddenly stopped playing.

That happened Saturday night at Wonder Bar on the Jersey shore.

Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers were just 20 minutes into their set when ... Bruce Springsteen crashed the show. He played for nearly two hours.

The Houserockers had no hard feelings.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Plantigrade Pastry Purloiner Persnickety

Jul 17, 2015

A Colorado bear recently had itself a heck of a breakfast: 24 pies.

The owners of the Colorado Cherry Company bakery between Lyons and Estes Park say they've experienced bear break-ins before, but this one was a little choosy.

Apparently during his early morning ransack, the bear went for apple and cherry pies — but left the strawberry rhubarb pies untouched.

When you have visitors you can't get rid, sometimes you just have to embrace them. That's the idea behind a festival on this week in the remote Siberian town of Berezniki, which is celebrating mosquitoes.

Revelers dress in mosquito costumes, vie to catch the most mosquitoes — and, perhaps oddest of all, hold a "most delicious girl" competition.

A panel of judges inspect contestants for who can get the most bites. The winner two years back had over 100.

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

For the past quarter-century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been gathering data from more than 400 scientists around the world on climate trends.

The report on 2014 from these international researchers? On average, it was the hottest year ever — in the ocean, as well as on land.

Copyright 2015 Capital Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.capradio.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

As you know, here at The Salt we've been a little obsessed with yogurt lately.

But there's a flip side to the story of the yogurt boom. What about that other product made from fermented milk that had its boom from 1950 to 1975, and has been sliding into obscurity ever since?

Cottage cheese took off as a diet and health food in the 1950s.

Syria's civil war has created the worst refugee crisis in the world, with more than 4 million people fleeing the country. Millions more have been displaced inside Syria, though we rarely hear from them.

Over the past year, NPR's Morning Edition has spoken three times with Saeed al-Batal, a photographer and filmmaker who doesn't use his real name for security reasons.

Seagulls don't get a lot of respect; they seem to be all screeching and scavenging for food. But at least one sea gull showed the guts of a hero recently.

Photographer David Canales caught what he called this "epic aerial battle" while kayaking in Alaska: A bald eagle, one seagull trapped in its talons, under ferocious assault from another gull.

Unfortunately, for all its fellow seagull's daring, the eagle's snack did not appear to escape.

It's happy hour in Illinois. Well, not right this instant, but many are happy that happy hour is back.

Alcoholic drink specials were banned in the state more than 25 years ago, but Gov. Bruce Rauner overturned that yesterday.

There are still some restrictions: So-called volume specials — like two-for-one, or all-you-can-drink — are not allowed.

Happy hour also has to end by 10 p.m. That's fine with your hard-working, overnight-hours Morning Edition staff, so long as happy hour can start at noon.

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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