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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Airlines Offer New Services — For A Fee

Airlines are introducing a new bevy of fees, but this time passengers might actually like them.

Unlike the first generation of charges which dinged fliers for once-free services like checking a bag, these new fees promise a taste of the good life, or at least a more civil flight.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Exhibit Illuminates Three Generations Of Wyeths

Jamie Wyeth, The Headlands of Monhegan Island, Maine, 2007, Oil on canvas, 40 x 60 inches. Wyeth Collection, ©Jamie Wyeth
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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

The Economic Impact Of A Government Shutdown

We’ve been hearing this week about the federal budget crisis in Washington. So far, the focus has been on members of Congress and their political battles.

But if Congress can’t agree on a way to fund government when the new fiscal year begins on Tuesday, then the spotlight could shift over to the economic bystanders.

Those are the innocent workers and business owners who stand to lose from any disruption in government.

NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax joins us to talk about the potential economic impact of a government shutdown.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

Senate OKs Budget Bill, But Fight Not Over

Update 2:08 p.m.: The Democratic-run Senate has approved legislation aimed at preventing a Tuesday federal shutdown.

Friday’s vote was 54-44.

But it remains unclear whether the Senate and the Republican-run House will be able to complete a compromise bill in time to get it to President Barack Obama for his signature before the government has to close.

That is because House GOP leaders are still struggling to figure out how they can win enough votes from conservatives to push a new version of the legislation through their chamber.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

A Look At Parkinson's As Michael J. Fox Returns To TV

Michael J. Fox returns to television tonight with the debut of "The Michael J. Fox Show." (NBC)

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 3:03 pm

It’s been 22 years since Michael J. Fox was first diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease — and 15 years since he famously told Barbara Walters that he would be cured of Parkinson’s before his 50th birthday.

That didn’t happen, but neither did his doctor’s stated expectation that he would have only about 10 more years to work in television.

Fox makes his return to television tonight — no longer trying hide his Parkinson’s symptoms, as he did during his six years on “Spin City.”

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Panera CEO Takes The Food Stamps Challenge

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 3:03 pm

Ron Shaich, the CEO and founder of Panera Bread lived on a food and beverage budget of $4.50 per day for a week.

That figure is about the same amount someone receiving food assistance would get per day.

He joins Here & Now to share what he’s learned from the experience.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Popular Science Disables Online Comments

(ccarlstead/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 3:03 pm

The magazine Popular Science is turning off its user comments, citing a study from the University of Wisconsin that shows readers exposed to rude or insulting comments reported a skewed view of the information they read in the article.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Upswing In China's Economy May Be Temporary

In this May 30, 2013: Volvo car at an assembly line of a Volvo factory in Chengdu, southwestern China's Sichuan province released by Volvo Cars. (AP Photo/Volvo Cars)

Manufacturing in China is at a six-month high, but many economists think this growth could be driven by government policy rather than by real demand.

“Modest growth is what you’re seeing,” NPR’s Shanghai correspondent Frank Langfitt told Here & Now.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Author Karen Russell Awarded MacArthur 'Genius Grant'

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 2:39 pm

Karen Russell’s debut novel “Swamplandia!” got critical raves, as did her follow-up short story collection “Vampires in the Lemon Grove.”

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

Kenyans Mourn, Come To Grips With Mall Attack

Zachary Yach and four others in the popular ArtCaffe survived the attack. (BBC)

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 2:41 pm

Kenya has begun three days of national mourning today, after the siege of a Nairobi shopping mall ended on Tuesday.

Now, the stories of what happened inside the mall are emerging, and people affected by the siege are still coming to terms with what’s happened.

The BBC’s Will Ross is in Nairobi and has been meeting those who were there, and the people trying to help them.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Remembering Nirvana's Final Album 'In Utero'

Cover art for "In Utero," Nirvana's third and final album. The album is being reissued to mark its 20th anniversary. (Nirvana)

To commemorate the 20th anniversary of Nirvana’s third and final record, “In Utero,” Here & Now speaks with pop culture critic Renee Graham, and Here & Now producer and director Alex Ashlock shares these thoughts:

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Ted Cruz Embraces 'Wacko Bird' Label

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 1:42 pm

Freshman U.S. Senator Ted Cruz of Texas began an old-fashioned talking filibuster this afternoon, to try to get the rest of the Senate to go along with his plan to defund Obamacare.

He will probably not be at a loss for words.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

After 21-Year Dry Streak, Pirates Make The Playoffs

Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Andrew McCutchen, left, Starling Marte, center and Marlon Byrd celebrate the Pirates' 2-1 win over the Chicago Cubs after a baseball game Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, in Chicago. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

The Pittsburgh Pirates finally snapped out of their 21-year losing streak and have clinched a spot in the playoffs.

In their game against the Chicago Cubs on Monday, the Pirates won 2-1, allowing them to advance to the playoffs, something the team hasn’t done since 1992.

Lanny Frattare experienced that day all those years ago. Frattare was the play-by-play announcer for the Pirates for 33 years.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Los Campesinos! Exclamation Point Not Optional

Los Campesinos! is a Welsh band. The band's new album is called "No Blues." (facebook.com/loscampesinos)

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 1:53 pm

NPR Music’s writer and editor Stephen Thompson brings Here & Now a new song each week to jazz up our play lists.

This week it’s a song from the upcoming album from Los Campesinos!. The album is called “No Blues” and the song is “What Death Leaves Behind.”

Thompson says the punctuation in the band’s name isn’t just casual.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Michigan Prepares To Battle Invasive Asian Carp

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources uses electric probes to stun fish. (Lindsey Smith/Michigan Radio)

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 1:53 pm

Asian carp, an invasive and destructive fish, have spread through the Mississippi, Ohio, Illinois and Missouri rivers. In total, the fish are affecting more than 20 states from Louisiana to South Dakota.

Under the right conditions, it could take as few as a dozen Asian carp to establish a population in the Great Lakes. That’s according to a report published this month by scientists in Ontario.

If they’re correct, the risk of even just a handful of Asian carp escaping into the Great Lakes could be more significant than officials had planned.

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NPR Story
1:28 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Elections In Germany May Shift Economic Tone In Eurozone

German chancellor Angela Merkel smiles behind German flags at the party headquarters in Berlin, Sunday, Sept. 22, 2013. (Michael Sohn/AP)

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 1:53 pm

Chancellor Angela Merkel has won her third term as Germany’s top leader.

But Merkel’s center-right Christian Democrats party fell five seats short of an absolute majority in the German Bundestag — the national parliament.

This may change some economic policies in the eurozone’s largest economy, including a softening towards bailed-out nations like Greece.

Financial Times reporter Cardiff Garcia joins Here & Now to explain.

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NPR Story
1:21 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Atlanta Wedding Reception Donated To The Homeless

Carol Fowler (in blue dress) and her family donated the reception from a cancelled wedding to 200 of Atlanta's homeless. (Hosea Feed the Hungry)
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NPR Story
1:21 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Verdict In Trial Of Bo Xilai Due This Weekend

In this Aug. 22, 2013 file photo released by the Jinan Intermediate People's Court, former Politburo member and Chongqing city party leader Bo Xilai, center, stands on trial at the court in eastern China's Shandong province. A verdict is expected on Sept. 22. (Jinan Intermediate People's Court via AP)

China’s biggest political scandal in decades reaches a conclusion this weekend.

A verdict is due in the trial of Bo Xilai, one of China’s rising political stars. He’s accused of corruption and covering up the murder of the British businessman Neil Heywood.

Bo’s wife has already been found guilty of poisoning Heywood, with whom she had a business dispute. Bo remains a popular figure.

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NPR Story
1:21 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

13 Injured In Chicago Park Shooting

Chicago Police detectives investigate the scene where a number of people, including a 3-year-old child, were shot in a city park on the south side of Chicago, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013. (Paul Beaty/AP)

Thirteen people were wounded in a shooting in Chicago late Thursday night, including a 3-year-old boy.

The shooting took place in the Back of the Yards neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago.

Police are still interviewing victims to determine a motive for the shooting, but a police spokesman said it appeared to be gang-related.

Chicago had more than 500 homicides in 2012, more than any other city in the United States.

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NPR Story
1:33 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Play Illuminates Rocky Year In Johnson Presidency

Bryan Cranston is pictured in "All the Way." (Evgenia Eliseeva/American Repertory Theater)

Bill Rauch graduated from Harvard University in 1984 and co-founded the Cornerstone Theater Company, which made a point of bringing theater to underserved places.

He’s since moved on to become artistic director of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Now, he returns to Cambridge, Mass. to direct “All the Way” at the American Repertory Theater.

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