Kristina Herrick

Classical Music Host

Kristina Herrick was an on-air host for FM89's Clearly Classical and the Traffic and Music Manager for the station. She retired in 2015. An expert in early music of the pre-Barqoue era, Kristina was also the host of the award winning program In the Mode. She is a talented musician who plays the gamba and is a member of the board of directors of the Philip Lorenz Memorial Keyboard Concert Series. 

Kristina traces In the Mode’s roots to her early days of studying voice, when she discovered that her own was best suited to this type of music. “I wanted to expose listeners to the new recordings of early music that are available,” she said. It’s not necessarily for those schooled in music, she noted. “There has been a lot of research done, using literature and paintings, to figure out what the pieces would have sounded like in their own time. It’s a lot of fun—and a lot of listening—putting the music into a coherent show with a focus.” It’s obvious that she enjoys it, and the accolades from listeners prove that they love it too.

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Music by French composer Marin Marais next time on In the Mode.  We’ll hear gambist Jordi Savall and his fabulous group of musicians play music from Marais’ Suitte d’un Gout Etranger Suite in a foreign style--a unique collection of some odd pieces.  By “foreign” Marais does not necessarily mean from outside of France, but foreign to the usual way of playing the viola da gamba. 

CD title: MARIN MARAIS Suitte d’un Goût Etranger, PIÈCES DE VIOLE du IV Livre, 1717

We’ll go to the very edge of the Renaissance with instrumental music by Dietrich Buxtehude next time on In The Mode.  He is really considered to be a Baroque composer who is most famous for his organ music, arguably the most important composer in Germany before Bach. We’ll hear some of his lovely trio sonatas, performed The Boston Museum Trio and Trio Sonnerie.

ITLE                                                PERFORMER                                   CD

Dietrich Buxtehude, Trio Sonatas      The Boston Museum Trio                  CENTAUR 2391

Next time on In the Mode we will again go to Tudor England with music from a Royal Songbook and songs by Henry VIII. The luxuriously illustrated Royal Songbook was given to Henry and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, in 1518 possibly by Petrus Alamire, and the group we will hear sing was named after him, according to Tudor music specialist, David Skinner, who conducts.  

 CD title: Henry’s Music, Motets from a Royal Choirbook, Songs by Henry Performer: AlamireCD label: OBSIDIAN  705  

CD title: Thomas Tomkins, Consort Music for Viols and Voices, Keyboard MusicPerformer: Rose Consort of Viols and Red ByrdCD label: NAXOS 550602 Thomas Tomkins was born in 1572 died in his 80s and saw many musical changes as did the other English composers of his generation including Gibbons and Weelkes. Many of them, including Tomkins, were pupils of William Byrd. Tomkins is sometimes called the last of the Elizabethans. Next time on In the Mode we’ll hear the Rose Consort of Viols and the vocal ensemble Red Byrd perform some of his music. 

The Red Book, Llibre Vermell, is a codex of pilgrim and liturgical music for the monastery of Montserrat, which sits on a mountain peak near Barcelona,  a pilgrim destination that  brought travelers from far away. The music was written specifically for this place, so unusual, we’ll also here some Trouvere songs and Cantigas de Santa Maria.

CD title: The Black Madonna, Pilgrim Songs from the Monastery of Montserrat (1400-1420)

Performer: Ensemble UnicornCD label: NAXOS 554256 

Most surviving music up to about the 12 century is church music, they had scribes writing it down, but of course people were singing outside church then as always. There is not much information about their music, but we do know a bit about the wandering Goliards, then minstrels or jongleurs, then the troubadors and trouveres. 

CD TITLE                                          PERFORMER                                   CD NUMBER

In the Mode will include the chant for Easter next time, “Ubi Caritas et Amor” sung by the Monks of Santo Domingo de Silos in Spain, and then  music by 20th century French composer Maurice Duruflé based on that chant, sung by the vocal ensemble Audite Nova. Also, a collaboration by three English composers, Sheppard, Byrd and Mundy in the last year before the final extinction of the Latin rite in England in 1558.  We’ll hear The Cardinall’s music perform In Exitu Israel.

Franco-Flemish composer John Richafort wrote his stunning Requiem for 6 voices to commemorate the death of his teacher, the great Josquin Desprez in 1521. He quotes some text and melodies of Josquin in the Missa pro Defunctis, that we will hear performed by the VOX early music ensemble, on In the Mode. 


CD TITLE: Josquin and the Lost Generation

PERFORMER: VOX Early Music Ensemble

CD label: Ancient Voice 001

Dancing was an everyday ritual at Renaissance courts, after supper, often lasting until the first morning light. Dance played a very important part in portraying civilized behavior and to persuade onlookers that the dancer is vigorous and healthy, it is a lot more than moving your feet, you can convey your emotions with a look or a touch. Next time on In the Mode, we’ll hear dances from Terpsichore by Praetorius, and songs too performed by Doulce Memoire.  CD title: Grand Bal a la cour d’Henri IVPerformer: Doulce MemoireCD label: harmonia mundi K617186 

It wasn’t always easy to find music to play when friends got together in early times, --couldn’t run to the copy machine, but there were part books for singers and often instrumentalists would use these—the words were still important.  We’ll hear the Sex Chordae Consort of viols play Monteverdi madrigals, Sunday at 12:06 on In the Mode.

CD title: Monteverdi: Terzo Libro

Performer: La Venexiana

CD label: Glossia 920910

CD title:  Claudio Monteverdi: Third Book of Madrigals for viol consort

Performer: Sex Chordae Consort of Viols