Valley Public Radio - Live Audio

Juanita Stevenson

Juanita Stevenson has lived and worked in Fresno for the past 24 years. She is perhaps best known to Valley residents as a longtime reporter and news anchor with local television station ABC30, and has also worked at stations KJWL, KYNO and ValleyPBS. She is the recipient of the 2001 Associated Press Award for Best Reporting, and the 1997 Radio & Television News Directors Association Regional Edward R. Murrow award for Best Reporting.

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Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition, we learn about how the state's new electoral reforms worked in real life following this month's election. Did the "top two" primary make the general election candidates more moderate and contests more competitive? Or did little actually change? Valley Public Radio's Joe Moore brings us a special report. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition, we continue our series of special reports on the fungal disease known as valley fever. Journalist Rebecca Plevin from the Reporting on Health Collaborative brings us the story of a young girl from Delano who contracted the disease last year, changing her life forever. Host Juanita Stevenson also talks with Yesenia Amaro, a health reporter for the Merced Sun-Star and member of the collaborative,  about the effort to bring more attention to this disease, and Dr. Dee Lacy, an infectious disease specialist with Kaiser Permanente Fresno. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition, we talk about how today's election may change not only the nation and California, but might also have a big impact on the political fortunes of California Governor Jerry Brown. Will Brown become a "lame duck" if Proposition 30 fails? We talk with Fresno State Political Science Professor Thomas Holyoke. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition, we hear a report about a group that plans to launch the nation's first social impact bond in the health care sector, targeting asthma prevention in Fresno. We'll also close our series of reports on the propositions before voters on the November ballot. We talk with criminal defense attorney Garrick Byers about Propositions 34 and 36.  Fresno County Supervisor Debbie Poochigian joins us to talk about Measure O, a measure that would make it easier for the Board of Supervisors to outsource certain jobs, including the public defender's office.

Valley Public Radio

On this Valley Edition, we hear Governor Jerry Brown talk about his ballot measure Proposition 30 in an interview with Ben Adler. We also examine Propositions 36, 37 and 38 with a series of special reports, and talk with retired Justice James Ardaiz and get his thoughts on efforts to make changes to California's "Three Strikes" law and to abolish the death penalty. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Arvin "Bucket Brigade"
The small Kern County community of Arvin has some of the worst air in the nation, thanks to geography and numerous pollution sources. But now some citizens are taking matters into their own hands, with a "bucket brigade" that aims to clean up the air by monitoring pollution themselves. On Sunday they gathered outside a local composting plant to protest what they call a major community polluter.  But their “do it yourself” efforts at monitoring pollution are not without controversy. Valley Public Radio's Joe Moore has this report:

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Segment 1: Police & Sheriff Consolidation in Fresno
Should the Fresno Police Department and Fresno County Sheriff's Department consider consolidating or merging their operations? That's the question a new study commissioned by the Fresno City Council seeks to answer.

Valley Public Radio

Animal Control and Shelter Services in Fresno: What's Next?

Today on Valley Edition we look at the competing tax measures on the November ballot, Propositions 30 and 38. Both promise to protect funding for schools but critics have questioned both, and some political observers have said that the presence of both on the ballot could mean neither will pass. We also talk with a Fresno couple who donated $1 million to fund scholarships for students at Fresno's Tehipite Middle School. And we also learn more about plans for a walk and series of events to raise awareness about asthma in the Central Valley. 

Heyday Books

Local photographer Joel Pickford's new book "Soul Calling: A Photographic Journey Through The Hmong Diaspora" is an intimate look into the world of the Hmong people.

Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Historical Ecology Study / San Francisco Estuary Institute-Aquatic Science Center / California Department of Fish and Game

Chocolate Milk Gets a Big Makeover
Chocolate milk is getting a big remix at schools in Fresno and beyond, as part of a effort to fight childhood obesity. A new formula developed by Producers Dairy for Fresno Unified is getting good reviews from both kids and nutrition experts, thanks to low fat and lower amounts of sugar than before. Nutritionist Sara Bosse also joins us to talk about efforts to improve school breakfast and lunch nutrition, and why 16 percent of kids in Fresno Unified says they've never even tasted traditional milk. 

Licensed using Creative Commons from Maria Pontikis / http://www.flickr.com/photos/anthimeria/3813431974/

The saying goes “milk does a body good.” But despite that, too few of us really drink the white stuff, and that includes adults and kids.

In an effort to get more kids to benefit from the nutrients milk offers many school districts including Fresno Unified served up flavored milk, both chocolate and strawberry.  So along with their daily intake of vitamin A, calcium and potassium, students were also getting sugar a lot of sugar, about four additional teaspoons in an 8 ounce serving of chocolate milk.

Valley Public Radio

On this Valley Edition, host Juanita Stevenson examines the recent surge in the number of cases of valley fever in the Central Valley, talks about solutions to the problem of inner city unemployment, and looks ahead to the upcoming events of the Sierra Art Trails program in the foothills of central California. 

On Sunday, 18 year old Fresno State freshman Philip Dhanens of Bakersfield died after spending a night drinking at an off-campus fraternity house. The university has since suspended the Theta Chi fraternity, and the Fresno Police Department is investigating the death. In 2006, Fresno State suspended the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity for five years after the death of 19 year old former student Danny Daniels. Binge drinking on campus is nothing new, but what steps can a university, parents, friends and student organizations take to prevent such tragedies from happening in the future?

This week on Valley Edition, we revisit the issue of the state's efforts to replace the former Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) program with the new Community Based Adult Services (CBAS) program. Advocates for those with severe disabilities say the new program is turning away many who should qualify, but the state disagrees. Lauren Whaley brings us a special report from Sacramento.

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