Joe Moore

Director of Program Content

Joe Moore is the Director of Program Content for Valley Public Radio. He supervises the station's news and music programming, website and radio operations, and is the host of the weekly program "Valley Edition." He is a native of Fresno and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. He has over 15 years of experience in all aspects of radio production, operations and management. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio in 2010 as the Director of Program Content, he spent six years as the station manager of KFSR, and taught audio production at Fresno State. In 2008 he was named one of Fresno's "40 Under 40" by the publication Business Street. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio, he was also active on the boards of several local non-profit organizations. His hobbies include photography, hiking and travel. Joe has a strong interest in local history and architecture, and is an avid baseball fan.

Ways To Connect

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

On this week's  show – why are whitewater rafters the latest group to feel the pain of California’s drought? We talk with Lois Henry of the Bakersfield Californian and find out what it means for Kern County’s tourism industry.

https://www.cirquedusoleil.com/en/shows/varekai/default.aspx

This week Fresno’s Save Mart Center will come alive in a very unique way.

The floor where Fresno State basketball players usually shoot jump shots will transform into an enchanted forest, complete with a volcano and fantastical creatures performing dazzling feats.

http://kernrafting.com/

The Kern River isn’t especially deep or wide  to quote Merle Haggard – but it is one of the wildest rivers in the state. It’s also a mecca for whitewater enthusiasts in search of thrilling adventures down the canyon every spring and summer. 

But with California mired in a historic drought, and snowpack only around 10 percent of normal for this time of year average, this year may be different. Among those feeling the pain are the many companies that specialize in whitewater tours on the Kern River, both below and above Lake Isabella.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

This week on Young Artists Spotlight we hear a performance by Bakersfield pianist Kelsey Jian. Kelsey Kelsey Jian was born in Lawrence Kansas. She moved to California with her family when she was eleven years old. She has two sisters. Her older sister Stephanie, who is currently studying Optometry at Berkeley, is a phenomenal pianist. Her younger sister Anna is also a talented pianist. Kelsey started taking piano lessons at the age of five and was told that she had perfect pitch.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

On today’s show, Atlantic columnist James Fallows joins us to talk about his new American Futures project, which has him reporting on issues in Fresno and the San Joaquin Valley.  We’ll also dig into the roots of the conflict within the Chukchansi

Kern County Public Library

In Kern County, the state’s leader when it comes to oil production, the industry not only drives the local economy, it also helps drive the county’s general fund.

That’s because the county’s assessor puts a value on all of the oil that remains deep underground, and uses that figure when it comes time to collect property taxes. When the price of oil goes up, county revenues soar. But when the price of oil goes down, officials are left scrambling to cover the shortfall.

Antonio Pompa-Baldi

Pianist Antonio Pompa-Baldi is in Fresno this weekend on an unusual mission: performing the complete cycle of Beethoven piano concertos over three concerts with the Fresno Philharmonic. The concerts will take the listener through Beethoven's musical evolution from his early works to the famous Piano Concerto No. 5 "Emperor." 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A local police department is hoping community outreach can help prevent distrust of law enforcement in the wake of violence in Ferguson, Missouri. FM89’s Joe Moore reports.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer says he wants to improve communication and trust between his officers and young people. That’s why he announced a plan Wednesday to create a new youth advisory panel for the department.

Dyer: “We never want to be viewed as an occupying force, we want to be viewed as a department that cares about the people we’re serving.”

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Two senate committees water and the environment held a joint hearing Tuesday in Sacramento focusing on the potential contamination of federally protected aquifers by oil producers. 

The state's Division of Oil Gas and Geothermal Resources had allowed production companies to inject oil field waste water into some aquifers that the EPA says could be used for drinking water. The revelation has resulted in the shutdown of 23 wells, slowing production in Kern County. 

Valley Public Radio / Ezra David Romero

This week on Valley Edition Mark Keppler, the executive director of the Maddy Institute, talks about the state of trails in the region. Also on the program Daniel Swain, with Stanford's Woods Institute for the Environment, talks about a new study examining the link between drought and global warming released last week.

http://davidcampos.co/index.html

Last month the nation and the San Joaquin Valley lost an icon of the world of poetry – Pulitzer Prize winner and US Poet Laureate Philip Levine.

One of his lasting legacies was the rich poetry community which he helped to foster here in Central California. Names like Gary Soto, David St. John, Larry Levis and now, David Campos.

His new collection of poems just won the prestigious 2014 Andres Montoya Poetry Prize, which is dedicated to supporting the work of emerging Latino poets.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

California is now in the fourth year of its on-going drought, and this winter’s meager snowpack has water experts worried, thanks to remarkably warm temperatures. But scientists at Stanford’s Woods Institute for the Environment say that in just a few decades, this severe condition could be the new norm, thanks to climate change.

http://www.traillink.com/trail/fresno-sugar-pine-trail--clovis-old-town-trail.aspx

Among the defining physical features of San Joaquin Valley cities are their irrigation canals. Some are just small ditches, while others are massive channels, but they all carry vital water to cities and farms throughout the region and have helped to make the valley bloom, and our modern economy possible.

Their banks are also un-official recreation spots for many, but a number of people want to change that, making their meandering paths part of a new network of community trails -  linear urban parks for walking, running and cycling. 

Almond Board of California

California’s almond orchards are turning from white to green this week as millions of blossoms fall, marking the end of this year’s bloom. But for one valley almond grower, work with the bees that make it all possible has just begun. FM89’s Joe Moore reports.

You probably know Paramount Farms from their brands like Wonderful Pistachios and POM Wonderful. Now the world’s largest grower of almonds and pistachios is adding a new product to that portfolio – something they call Wonderful Bees.

https://www.facebook.com/124138571000858/photos/a.124146077666774.31490.124138571000858/700246926723350/?type=1&theater

Last week, an ambitious planned development that seemingly died during the recession reemerged in rural Kings County.

The developers behind the proposed community of Quay Valley say this new city of 75,000 people would be located on a barren stretch of Interstate 5 south of Kettleman City.

While things like water, infrastructure and jobs all remain big questions, the developers have announced one other detail – a planned 5 mile test track for entrepreneur Elon Musk’s proposed Hyper Loop.

Ezra David Romero

This week on Valley Edition FM89's Diana Aguilera reports on one Fresno group's vision to tackle homelessness by creating eco-friendly shelters. John Lindt, with Sierra2theSea.net, joins the program for a conversation about the possibility of a new Central California town called Quay Valley that may have a hyper loop. 

Central Valley Friendly Landscaping Website - http://ucanr.edu/sites/cvlandscape/ / University of California, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources

It might become a little easier to replace your lawn with artificial grass if a new bill in Sacramento becomes law. FM89’s Joe Moore reports.

Assemblymember Rudy Salas says he wants to take the model the state has used to subsidize solar power on homes across the state and apply it to another green project – removing lawns.

Salas introduced a bill Tuesday that would provide a tax credit to homeowners who remove their lawns and replace them either with drought-resistant landscaping or synthetic lawns.

Matt Black

Some of the most vivid depictions of California’s drought have come from Exeter-based photographer Matt Black. In 2014 TIME Magazine named him their “Instagram Photographer of the Year” for his stark images of dust storms, dry fields, and parched rivers.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition reporter Jennifer Burger attends the Central Valley opening of the feature film McFarland, USA.  Reporter Ezra David Romero goes on a bus tour with 4o East Asian farmers to the Bay to discover new markets. 

Fresno State News

U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Philip Levine died on Saturday at his home in Fresno. He was age 87. The former Fresno State professor was known as the poet of the working class, and drew inspiration from his time working in the auto industry in his native Detroit and from the San Joaquin Valley, which he called home for nearly 60 years.

Levine took pride in bringing stories of physical labor in America to the world of poetry. Poet Peter Everwine was a close friend and colleague.

Pages