Joe Moore

Director of Program Content

Joe Moore is the Director of Program Content for Valley Public Radio. He supervises the station's news and music programming, website and radio operations, and is the host of the weekly program "Valley Edition." He is a native of Fresno and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. He has over 15 years of experience in all aspects of radio production, operations and management. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio in 2010 as the Director of Program Content, he spent six years as the station manager of KFSR, and taught audio production at Fresno State. In 2008 he was named one of Fresno's "40 Under 40" by the publication Business Street. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio, he was also active on the boards of several local non-profit organizations. His hobbies include photography, hiking and travel. Joe has a strong interest in local history and architecture, and is an avid baseball fan.

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Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our staff reports on how the drought is harming bees in California, lawmaking around HIV, the future of Fresno's Blackstone Avenue and how the bark beetle is decimating conifers in the Sierra Nevada. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

California’s drought is having a devastating effect on its forests. Aerial surveys around the state show more than 20 million dead trees so far. And the drought has a partner in crime – the pine beetle. As Amy Quinton reports from Sacramento, if this deadly combination continues it could drastically change California’s forested landscape.

Courtesy US Forest Service / InciWeb

August 25

The lightning ignited Rough Fire is still only 17 percent contained, even though the burn area has grown to 51,794 acres. There are 1,984 firefighters using 138 engines and 10 helicopters to fight the blaze.  

In an interview Tuesday morning Valley Public Radio's Joe Moore spoke with Rough Fire Spokesman Mike Pruitt about the blaze. Reporter Ezra David Romero also shares about his experience at the fire and shares the story of 25 backpackers who had to hike out of the backcountry. Listen to the interview and story above. 

US Forest Service Facebook

The community of Hume Lake is under a mandatory evacuation order today after the southern flank of the Rough Fire crossed the Kings River. So far, the lightning sparked blaze has consumed over 23,600 acres. Tony Botti with the Fresno County Sheriff's Department says the biggest concern is the safety of area residents. His department ordered the evacuation late Tuesday afternoon.

Lance Johnson / Licensed under Creative Commons from Flickr user LanceJohnson http://www.flickr.com/photos/lancejohnson/5703722259/

When UC Merced first opened its doors in 2005, campus enrollment was just 875 students. Now a decade later, over 6,000 students attend the newest University of California campus, and thousands more are being turned away. As the only UC campus in the San Joaquin Valley, campus leaders hope to expand the number of available slots to over 10,000 by the year 2020 to meet growing demand.  

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition FM89's Ezra David Romero reports on how officials in the Fresno area prepping for possible flooding from a looming El Niño. Meteorologist and Fresno State Lecturer Sean Boyd explains what's conjuring up what could be an answer to California's drought.  

Clovis Unified

Floyd Buchanan, the man who built the Clovis Unified School District into an educational powerhouse has died at age 91. FM89's Joe Moore reports his work not only helped shape thousands of young lives, but also both the cities of Fresno and Clovis.

Known by many as "Doc" - Floyd Buchanan was a charismatic and visionary leader. The first superintendent of Clovis Unified, he saw the district grow dramatically during his tenure from 1960 to 1991. 

Buchanan emphasized both academics and athletics, but regardless of the venue his personality set a tone for the district. 

Eric Paul Zamora / The Fresno Bee

There’s a controversy brewing in Fresno that has school districts up and down the state watching very closely. It all has to do with how districts spend taxpayer money when they build a new school. Traditionally districts would build up reserves or bond money for a new school, and then put the project out to bid for design and construction. The lowest bidder typically would get the job.

Courtesy of Steve Skibbie

Creative Fresno is on the hunt for murals. 

Murals outside of bars. Murals on random petroleum station walls. Murals in parks. 

Murals. Murals. Murals. 

The group recently began collecting data on murals throughout Fresno County in a project called the Digital Mural Map funded by the Fresno Regional Foundation. The project will feature photos of the murals and information about the artists on a mobile friendly website and later select murals will be featured in a photo book. The mural hunt will end in December and the website should be up and running in May, 2016.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition KVPR's Jeffrey Hess reports on animal control in Fresno County. Later, Host Joe Moore is joined by Bill McEwen of The Fresno Bee to talk about schools and politics in Fresno. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

The first concrete pour is in and more are soon to follow as the construction site begins to hum with activity. The initial pour was for the foundation of the building, along all of the load bearing walls of the structure. Next week workers will return to the site with more concrete to pour the floor slab for the office portion of the building. Days later they will return and make a third pour, for the studio spaces.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we learn why scientists fear some Giant Sequoias are at risk thanks to the drought. We also learn about plans for development in Fresno County in the area along Friant Road and the San Joaquin River, as well as new rules designed to save the lives of farm workers in California's hot summer months. In interviews this week, we talk to John Cox of the Bakersfield Californian about an effort by Kern County to make drilling a new oil well as easy as getting a building permit.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Toro Nagashi is an ancient Buddhist ceremony which dates to the 7th century and is traditionally associated with the Obon season in Japan. In Fresno, the community will celebrate the event with a special event in Woodward Park near the Shinzen Japanese Garden on Saturday August 8th. At dusk hundreds of lighted paper lanterns will be released onto the lake, representing the spirits of loved ones.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Spurred on by a request by local oil industry leaders, Kern County is currently exploring a plan that would dramatically revamp the way the county permits oil and gas wells. Under an environmental study that's currently in the works, getting a new well permit could become as easy as getting a county building permit.

For Fresno natives of a certain age, Al Radka, the Fulton Mall, Lesterburger and parties in "the figs" all are cultural touchstones that bring back memories of a simpler time. They're also the subject of a new book by journalist Steven H. Provost titled "Fresno Growing Up: A City Comes of Age: 1945-1985." From historic photos of long lost Fresno landmarks to stories about life in the 50's and 60's, the new book seeks to capture the essence of an era when so many baby boomers grew up.

US Forest Service

In the last 24 hours the Willow Fire has grown by around 1,000 acres, fueled by dense brush, hot conditions and wind. As of Friday morning the fire has consumed around 4,300 acres and is 30 percent contained.  The blaze began Saturday near Bass Lake and is now 30 percent contained. 

Officials say the southern flank of the fire is now burning in the footprint of the 2001 North Fork fire, an area filled with dense brush, tree snags and dead woody material. On the north crews are making progress battling the fire around a large granite outcropping known as the 7 Rock. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess reports on how ex-felons are finding a clean slate under Prop 47. He also interviews Barbara Scrivner who was granted clemency by President Obama in December after being incarcerated for 20 years for conspiracy to sell crystal meth. We also hear from Reporter Amy Quinton on how bats could help walnut growers control pests

A new report from Fresno State's Central Valley Health Policy Institute highlights the high incidence of infant mortality in the African-American Community. According to study data, African-American babies in Fresno are three times more likely to die when compared with white infants. Recently on Valley Edition we spoke with Lauren N. Lessard, PhD MPH, a research scientist at the Central Valley Health Policy Institute about the study, and why the numbers have grown in recent years. 

Office of Alex Padilla

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla wants to increase the number of voters in the Golden State. That's why he is backing several new measures that would overhaul the state's election system. They include a new bill that would expand the state's "motor voter" provisions and another that would expand vote-by-mail and early voting opportunities. Padilla joined us to talk about those efforts and an overhaul of the state's voter database after he spoke at an naturalization ceremony in Fresno on Tuesday morning. 

Office of Rep. David Valadao

Last week the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Western Water and American Food Security Act, which promises to bring more water to valley farmers. Written by Hanford Republican David Valadao, and co-sponsored by Fresno Democratic Rep. Jim Costa, the bill would change the way the government manages water in the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta and threatened species. It would also make major changes to the plan to restore the San Joaquin River. 

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