Joe Moore

Director of Program Content

Joe Moore is the Director of Program Content for Valley Public Radio. He supervises the station's news and music programming, website and radio operations, and is the host of the weekly program "Valley Edition." He is a native of Fresno and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. He has over 15 years of experience in all aspects of radio production, operations and management. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio in 2010 as the Director of Program Content, he spent six years as the station manager of KFSR, and taught audio production at Fresno State. In 2008 he was named one of Fresno's "40 Under 40" by the publication Business Street. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio, he was also active on the boards of several local non-profit organizations. His hobbies include photography, hiking and travel. Joe has a strong interest in local history and architecture, and is an avid baseball fan.

Ways to Connect

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

The Valley Air District is asking the federal government to do more to help clean up the air in Central California. 

The district has submitted a petition to the U.S. EPA asking the agency to adopt more stringent national standards for cleaner trucks and trains.

The district’s executive director Seyed Sadredin says despite on-going local efforts to reduce ozone and particulate pollution, meeting the newest federal health standards would require reducing fossil fuel emissions by another 90 percent. And that he says isn’t something the district can’t do alone.

Valley Public Radio

  This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess recounts the First Family's trip to Yosemite National Park. We also hear reporting from KVPR'S Ezra David Romero on how a sheep farmer is growing feed indoors to save water. Later in the program Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports on groundwater issues in Paso Robles. FM89's Jeffrey Hess also reports on Laura's Law, the California state law that allows for court-ordered assisted outpatient treatment. Ending the program we hear from Agustín Lira And Patricia Wells about their new album 'Songs Of Hope And Struggle."

Courtesy of artist

It’s not every day that two Fresno musicians release a new CD on the prestigious Smithsonian Folkways record label. But Agustin Lira and Patricia Wells aren’t your typical Fresno musicians.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

New salary numbers are out today for top City of Fresno administrators. Last year the city’s highest paid employee was retiring pension fund manager Stanley McDivitt, who was paid  $345,000, including a $150,000 leave payout, nearly equal to his entire annual salary. Former Chief Information Officer Carolyn Hogg earned $279,000, including a $100,000 severance package.

The disclosures were released this week by city officials as required by Fresno's Transparency Act.

California High-Speed Rail Authority

Work is progressing on the high-speed rail project’s most visible landmark in downtown Fresno, the new Tuolumne Street Bridge. Workers today began lifting the first of 42 massive steel and concrete girders into place.

The beams are 149 feet long and each weighs 83 tons. They will one day carry vehicle traffic from both Highway 99 and downtown Fresno over the Union Pacific and high speed rail tracks. Officials with the California High-Speed Rail Authority say that construction on the bridge is ahead of schedule.

Plenary Properties Merced / UC Merced

The community is getting its first look today at the newly unveiled plans for a $1.1 billion expansion of UC Merced. The campus has selected the partnership of Plenary Properties Merced to design, build and operate the facility, which will allow the campus to expand to 10,000 students by the year 2020.

The proposal includes a private investment of $386 million, which is in addition to $600 million in revenue bonds already approved by UC Regents.

CMAC

Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin delivered a message about long term changes in the city's direction Wednesday in what will be her last State of the City speech.

It was something of a victory lap for Swearengin who is nearing the end of her second and final term in office. Before a crowd at the Convention Center, she touted improvements over the last seven-and-a-half years in a number of areas, from the city’s financial health to Fresno’s shrinking homeless population. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

For the first time in nearly a decade, Fresno is not one of the top ten cities in the nation for auto theft. 

The study released this month from the National Insurance Crime Bureau shows that at least when compared with other cities, Fresno is faring better when it comes to vehicle theft. As recently as 2011, Fresno led the nation in stolen cars. Last year it dropped to number nine, and this year all the way to 13.

justgrimes/Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

This week on Valley Edition Host Joe Moore leads a conversation about the 2016 primaries. He is joined by Fresno State Political Science Professor Jeffrey Cummins, Republican Political Analyst Jim Verros and The Bakersfield Californian's Christine Bedell. The group chat about a few surprises that came out of the primaries and  the races they are looking forward to in November. 

http://www.fresnosheriff.org/admin/sheriff.html

As details continue to emerge about the shooter who killed at least 49 people Sunday at a LGBTQ nightclub in Orlando, many are asking if this could happen here. Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims joined us on Valley Edition to talk about this mass shooting means for the debate over firearms, and the way law enforcement agencies share information about suspected terrorists, or those who sympathize with the self-described Islamic State.

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