Valley Public Radio - Live Audio

Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero worked with Valley Public Radio from 2012-2017. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air.  In January he was awarded a Golden Mike Award from the Radio & Television News Association for Southern California for this series. He beat out some of the largest radio stations in the state.

In 2015 he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways to Connect

Stephanie Barraza

The world for the retiree is evolving. For some retirement means a chance to globe-trot or travel across the country in an RV, but for many 65 is just another milestone, a reminder of poor financial decisions earlier in life or a chance to explore a second career.

This week on Valley Edition we look into an airplane disaster that took place in the hills near Coalinga 65 years ago. The accident grabbed national headlines and even inspired a song by Woody Guthrie titled 'Deportee.' Valley Public Radio reporter Rebecca Plevin explores the tragedy with the help of local author Tim Z. Hernandez and his quest to ensure that those who died in the crash are not forgotten. Hernandez, along with the Fresno Diocese and Holy Cross Cemetery are working together to erect a memorial headstone with the full names of all 28 passengers. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we venture into the topic of the future of downtown Fresno. Valley Edition host Juanita Stevenson explores the differing opinions on how Fresno should invest time, effort and funds into downtown, whether the Fulton Mall should be renovated and the vibe that could be cultivated in the region of the city. Joining Stevenson are Director of Downtown Community Revitalization for the City of Fresno Craig Scharton, Chair of the Downtown Fresno Coalition Kate McKnight and Fresno Brewing Company owner Ephiram Bosse.

Ezra Romero / Valley Public Radio

The food truck, once known for dreaded boring prepackaged sandwiches or carne asada tacos, has taken a turn for the better. The trucks have gone gourmet.

They no longer do boring. In fact, many food trucks across the nation have created infusions of local produce with a unique and somewhat international flare.

The evolution of the roach coach hit Fresno in 2012 in the form of what locals call CartHop. The traveling band of six local gourmet food vendors meet in three locations for lunch across Fresno and plan to open the door even wider to foodies in 2013.

Valley Public Radio

In this week's Valley Edition, 89.3's Rebecca Plevin shares the story of Pablo Reyes-Morales, a West Hills College Student, Lemoore. Morales counts himself among the ranks of the 'Dream Army' – or, young, undocumented people who would qualify for the federal DREAM ACT, if it were passed - and are currently barred from serving in the U.S.

Ezra Romero / Valley Public Radio

For Rene and Veronica Ramirez careers in medicine were always a dream. But with childhoods spent in rural California – Dinuba and Kerman – the couple’s desire to bring aid back to their communities seemed only to be just wishful thinking.

"I always thought I would like to be a doctor, but I didn’t know if I actually could do it," she said.

That’s Veronica Ramirez. She says her family helped her develop an interest in medicine early on.

“I’ve had medical problems in my family, my mom has epilepsy, and I have experienced that since I was very young," she said. 

C. Taylor Crothers

This week on Valley Edition, Rebecca Plevin reports on the California Air Resources Board's approval of a plan intended to bring the Valley's particulate pollution into compliance with federal standards. But residents and health advocates expressed concern that the plan doesn't act quickly enough to protect public health.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

The way Fresno high school football coaches run offseason training this spring and summer will be different than in any training season prior. The reason: offseason tackling has become a major no, no.

In an attempt to decrease the number of football related injuries among Valley youngsters, mainly concussions, the Fresno Unified School District enacted a new policy last week to ban full contact during the offseason.

So what does this mean for Valley football players?

Ezra Romero / Valley Public Radio

The waiting game has just begun for both sides in the battle over the outsourcing of Fresno’s residential trash service.

For the past month opponents of Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin’s plan to outsource the city’s home trash service have hustled to collect signatures in order to meet a January 18 deadline to put the decision in the hands of voters.

More than 50 people escorted around 35,000 signatures in seven sealed white boxes into the City Clerk’s Office on Friday.