Valley Public Radio - Live Audio

Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero has worked with Valley Public Radio for just under three years. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air.  In January he was awarded a Golden Mike Award from the Radio & Television News Association for Southern California for this series. He beat out some of the largest radio stations in the state.

In 2015 he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways to Connect

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

This is the third installment in our series Contaminated, in which we explore the 300 California communities that lack access to clean drinking water. When we began the series, we introduced you to the community of Lanare, which has arsenic-tainted water while a treatment plant in the center of town sits idle. 

Today, we return to Lanare to learn why infrastructure projects aren’t always enough, and how Sacramento is trying to ensure Lanare never happens again.

Valley Public Radio

On this week's show our reporters return to the Fresno County community of Lanare for our series "Contaminated." We also hear Reporter Jeffrey Hess interview Fresno Mayor Lee Brand on an Amazon distribution center coming to Fresno. Later we hear from Tuolumne Winter Rangers Rob and Laura Pilewski talk about the extreme weather conditions this year and what it's like to spend the winter in isolation. Scripps National Spelling Bee Winner Ananya Vinay also joins the program. And ending the show we learn all about the CSU Summer Arts program coming to Fresno State this summer.

theovationtheatre.com

Bakersfield has a new stage for actors to perform on. And its first show, "Jesus Christ Superstar," opens June 2.

The new space in the downtown Bakersfield arts district is called The Ovation Repertory Theatre. Its owned by Adam Cline, Hal Friedman and Bien Resolme. Friedman joined Valley edition Tuesday May 30 to tell us more about the opening and upcoming shows. To listen to the interview click play above.  

Courtesy Electronic Frontier Foundation

The Kern High School District launched nine internal investigations in 2016 for inappropriate use of the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System.

Valley Public Radio

In this week's Valley Edition our team reports stories on ambulance abusers, bees and California missions. We also hear from Bakersfield Californian Report Harold Pierce on happenings in Kern County. Later KVPR Reporter Kerry Klein tells us more about the Be Public Live event she'll be hosting Thursday June 1 all about the doctors shortage in the region. Ending the program we hear from Hal Friedman about a new show in Kern County at the Ovation Repertory Theatre. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Spring is here and it’s the perfect time to get outdoors. There are, of course, lots of fun things to do outside this time of year, but one sport is attracting locals specifically to rock faces everywhere.

Ezra David Romero
Valley Public Radio

Understanding the information on a voting ballot can be tough even for English speakers. For many second language learners the voting process can be so intimidating that they don’t vote, in part because of the lack of materials in their own language.

Now a group of Punjabi people in Fresno want to change that experience.

Almost every afternoon older Indian-American men from the province of Punjab gather under the shade and play cards in Victoria West Community Park in West Fresno. Deep Singh says it’s a chance to get out of the house.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports stories on child care, chronic diseases and the Punjabi language. We also hear from Laura Rosenthal with CALmatters on President Donald Trump's relationship with Rep. Kevin McCarthy. Ending the program you'll hear our latest episode of Outdoorsy. This time we talk all about rock climbing.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports on what's at stake in Giant Sequoia National Monument under the Department of Interior's review. We also hear about how Huron school's want to split from the Coalinga-Huron Unified School District. Later we learn more about why political newcomer Andrew Janz hopes to challenge Devin Nunes. We also hear from Bakersfield College President Sonya Christian about changes coming to the campus. Ending the program we hear from Michele Ellis Pracy about new exhibits coming to the Fresno Art Museum. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Last month President Donald Trump signed an executive order putting 20 plus national monuments across the country under review including Giant Sequoia National Monument in the mountains of Tulare, Fresno and Kern counties. Now 17 years after the monument's creation, its existence is in question.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

In late April, we launched a series called “Contaminated” where our team explores communities in the region affected by water unsafe to drink. In our first story, we visited a Fresno County community that can’t afford to maintain the arsenic treatment plant the federal government funded 10 years ago. 

We continue today with a look at a Madera County mountain community where residents have been exposed to a different hazardous material in water for decades—but they could have clean water by the end of the year.

Valley PBS

Earlier this month Valley PBS launched a documentary miniseries called "Tapped Out: The History and Battle over Water in California’s San Joaquin Valley." 

The four-part series examines the history of water in California. Each episode delves into a different part of the history and future of water in the region and includes the voices of farmers, water leaders and environmentalists.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports on water contamination issues in the Oakhurst area as well a piece about changes to the American Health Care Act. Later, we're joined by the Bakersfield Californian's Lois Henry to talk about her latest column on police corruption. FM89's Jeffrey Hess also interviews Congressman David Valadao about his recent trip to the Korean Peninsula. Ending the program we hear about a new documentary series by Valley PBS and Filmmaker Jeff Aiello called "Tapped Out."

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

In 2012, California made history when it became the first U.S. state to declare that clean drinking water is a human right. But five years later, nearly 300 communities still can’t drink their water, according to new state data—many of which are in the San Joaquin Valley.

Today we debut a series about drinking water, in which we explore where these communities are and why it’s so difficult to get clean water. We begin in rural Fresno County north of Lemoore.

Pace Press

Fresno’s Linden Publishing has been around for decades, producing books in the non-fiction world under the Quill Driver Books label. Now the company is making a big splash with two new novels by local authors on a new imprint dedicated to fiction works. We talk with Jaguar Bennett and Heather Parrish of Pace Press, as well as retired judge James Ardaiz, author of the upcoming novel Fractured Justice, which will be released later this year.

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