Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero has worked with Valley Public Radio for just under three years. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air. 

In June he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways to Connect

Bitwise Industries

 The Valley is known for growing things. But lately some of the region’s most notable crops haven’t been grown on a farm, they’ve been grown in front of a laptop, or an iPad – new and growing software companies. Now local technology leaders in both Kern and Fresno Counties are talking about how to strategically grow the local software industry to the next level. So how can tech jobs power the future economy of the valley? We spoke to three local tech experts about where the local industry is going:

Guests:

Ezra David Romero / Valley Publir Radio

The USDA and the National Center for Lesbian Rights are working to meet the needs of rural LGBT residents in the valley. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports over 200 people attended the California LGBT Rural Pride Summit Thursday in Visalia.

The effort to preserve a healthy population of salmon in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a huge challenge. Those little salmon have a lot of factors working against them. Now a bill in the House of Representatives is trying to take on one of them, the striped bass.

The “Save Our Salmon Act” by Republican Jeff Denham of Turlock would update a 1992 environmental law that manages fish in the Delta. That law sought to increase the number of salmon, but it also set out to double the number of striped bass.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Oliver Baines has a unique perspective on the issue of Black Lives Matter and law enforcement. Currently the only African-American on the Fresno City Council, Baines also served around 12 years as an officer with the Fresno Police Department.  Speaking on Valley Public Radio’s Valley Edition Tuesday, Baines recalled his own experiences with racially biased policing, while pleading for calm and understanding in the wake of recent shootings and protests.  Baines said the often heated rhetoric from people on both sides of the issue serves to distract from the goal of racial reconciliation.

Kerry Klein / Valley Public Radio

It’s not every day that a musician from Fresno is honored by the National Endowment For the Arts with a prestigious national fellowship. But Bounxeung Synanonh one of the leading performers of the traditional Lao instrument the khaen recently received national recognition for his artistry from the group.

MAGGIE STARBARD / NPR

Dan Charles reports on agriculture for NPR. Over the past year he reported a series on farmworkers across the country. Recently he wrote a  post on NPR's food blog The Salt titled "Inside The Lives Of Farmworkers: Top 5 Lessons I Learned On The Ground." In this interview Valley Edition Host Joe Moore interviews Charles about this list and his reporting. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess explores why certain police shootings - like the shooting death of Dylan Noble - receive more attention than others. We also hear from Fresno City Councilmember Oliver Baines about his time as a police officer, his response to police involved shootings and more. Later FM89 Reporter Kerry Klein reports on the success of Fresno's needle exchange program. We also hear from NPR's Dan Charles about his latest article focusing on the five things he's learned while reporting on farmworkers.

Corporation for Better Housing

Farmworkers in Kern County could soon have another option for housing. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports on the USDA’s effort to give the people who pick the nation's produce better homes.

 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Fresno Police have released body camera footage  from the shooting death of the unarmed teen Dylan Noble from late June. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

 

One of the two videos starts off with the officers pulling over 19-year-old Dylan Noble at a traffic stop. After the teen gets out of his truck he ignores the officer's demands to remove his hands from behind his back.

Alicia Griffin/Kris Robinson / Flickr

Farmers markets are full of bright colored produce at this time of year. Think sweet stone fruit, tart berries and tomatoes of every color. People love tasty heirloom tomatoes but they can be hard to grow and they’re expensive. That’s why researchers want to create a stronger plant. They’re doing this using a new twist on an old technique.

Scott Stoddard is an expert when it comes to tomatoes. He plants rows and rows of the fresh-market crop on farms across Merced and Madera counties for the UC Cooperative Extension. 

Pages