Colin Fogarty

Colin Fogarty fell in love with public radio as a 19–year–old student at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. He launched his life in radio as a board operator at WMUB, where he spun records for "Mama Jazz." He was always a news junky, but he got hooked on reporting when he covered a 1992 campaign rally. Colin ran across the quad, stuck a microphone in then-Senator Al Gore's face and asked a question. When Gore actually answered, Colin knew he had found his calling.

Colin spent 13 years as a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting, covering politics and the state legislature. His stories were frequently heard on NPR and won regional and national awards. In September 2008, he landed the best job he could imagine as the editor of a talented team of regional correspondents serving 12 public radio stations in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.

Colin lives in Portland with his wife Stephanie, their three children and three chickens.

Around the Nation
12:43 am
Wed September 25, 2013

Proposed Power Lines Tangle With Native American History

Four humanlike figures were painted in a cave in Washington hundreds or even thousands of years ago.
Colin Fogarty Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 3:25 am

Imagine running power lines through a cathedral. That's how archaeologists describe what the Bonneville Power Administration proposes doing in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington state. The federal electricity provider is trying to string a new transmission line near a cave that contains ancient paintings, a site considered sacred by Native Americans.

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