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Crime In The City
12:55 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Rotenberg's Toronto Thrillers Mix Canadian Courtesy With Murder

From the Toronto Islands — one of many real-life Toronto locales in Robert Rotenberg's legal thrillers — visitors have a clear view of the city's skyline.
Sean Dawsean Flickr

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 12:02 am

Robert Rotenberg has written four legal thrillers set in Toronto, that old industrial city on the shores of Lake Ontario. He's a criminal lawyer — all his books are centered on trials — and he loves his city so much that he makes multicultural Toronto a character in his books. His first release, Old City Hall, is even named after a Toronto landmark: a beautiful stone building that is now used as a courthouse.

Real Courtrooms, Real Courtesy

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Shots - Health News
12:04 am
Mon July 1, 2013

You Ask, We Answer: Demystifying The Affordable Care Act

Families soon will be able to sign up for new health insurance options through the Affordable Care Act. In Washington, D.C., Dr. Cheryl Focht of Mary's Center performs a checkup of Jayson Gonzalez, 16, while his mother, Elizabeth Lopez, looks on.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:25 am

The biggest changes in health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act are set to begin less than three months from now. Oct. 1 is when people can start signing up for coverage in new state health exchanges. The policies would kick in on Jan. 1, 2014.

It can all be a little confusing, we agree. So two weeks ago, we asked what you wanted to know about the health law.

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Europe
12:01 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Thar He Blows: Trump Tussles With Scots Over Wind Turbines

Donald Trump plays a stroke as he officially opens his new Trump International Golf Links course in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, last July. Now, he is aggressively fighting Scottish plans to build 11 wind turbines off the coast overlooked by his golf course and other proposed projects.
Andy Buchanan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:52 am

A fierce legal battle is under way in Scotland, involving U.S. tycoon Donald Trump.

At the heart of the wrangle: wind.

Europe is leading the way in generating energy using wind. Huge turbines whir away on the hills and in the seas throughout the continent.

The roots of Trump's hatred for these turbines can be found, at least in part, in what was once a stretch of rolling dunes and grassland in northeastern Scotland, overlooking the North Sea.

He is spending hundreds of millions creating a resort there.

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It's All Politics
12:00 am
Mon July 1, 2013

In Houston, America's Diverse Future Has Already Arrived

Glenda Joe, a seventh-generation Chinese-Houstonian.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:16 am

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

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The Two-Way
11:45 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

Arizona Officials: 19 Firefighters Killed Battling Blaze

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 3:47 am

Forestry officials in Arizona say 19 firefighters have died while fighting a massive fire that has ripped through half of the town of Yarnell Hill, reports The Arizona Republic.

The newspaper reports:

" 'It's a dark day,' said Mike Reichling, Arizona State Forestry Division spokesman.

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Economy
11:28 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

Alabama County Files Plan To Exit Bankruptcy

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 7:57 am

Alabama's bankrupt Jefferson County has filed a 101-page plan that would force creditors to lose up to 70 cents on the dollar.

In 2011, the county underwent what's been called the largest government bankruptcy in U.S. history. It's in debt by about $4.2 billion.

Because of combination of corruption and poor management, the municipality was unable to repay money it borrowed to upgrade its sewage system.

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Sports
10:51 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

Park Wins U.S. Women's Open For 3rd Straight Major

Inbee Park holds up the U.S. Women's Open trophy after her four-stroke victory in front of I.K. Kim of South Korea (center) and low amateur Casie Cathrea (right) at Sebonack Golf Club on Sunday in Southampton, New York. Park has won three consecutive major titles.
Gregory Shamus Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 2:16 am

Inbee Park set many golfing goals. Etching her name alongside Babe Zaharias was never one of them.

Yet now they're the only two players to win the first three majors of the year. Park became the first to accomplish the feat in the modern era Sunday with her second U.S. Women's Open title.

"Trying to put my name next to hers means just so much," Park said. "I would think I would never get there; it's somewhere that I've never dreamed of. But all of a sudden, I'm there."

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Movies
3:58 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

Casting Call: Hollywood Needs More Women

Actress Geena Davis addresses the audience at the "Driving Financial Success: Women + Movies = Bigger Box Office" luncheon at CinemaCon 2013.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Sun June 30, 2013 4:35 pm

Summer is the perfect time for a night out at the cinema, but maybe you've noticed something missing at the movies: women.

Women make up a minority of movie creators: 7 percent of directors, 13 percent of writers and 20 percent of producers; that's nearly five men for every woman working behind the scenes.

Out of last year's biggest movies, 28 percent of speaking characters were female. That's down from a third just five years ago, according to the Annenberg School at the University of Southern California.

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It's All Politics
3:58 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

Big Growth Could Shake Up Texas' Old Political Equation

A bilingual sign stands outside a polling center at a public library ahead of local elections on April 28 in Austin, Texas.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:36 am

It's no secret: Texas is big. And it's getting bigger.

The Lone Star State has added about 5 million people since the turn of the century, and its population is expected to swell by another 5 million by 2020.

This week, NPR examines the dramatic demographic shifts underway in the Lone Star State in our series Texas 2020. We'll look ahead to how the second-biggest state could change in the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of America.

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Around the Nation
2:30 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

New Rules Puts Brakes On Truck Drivers' Schedules

Between 3,000 and 4,000 people die each year in large truck and bus crashes. New rules that go into effect Monday aim to reduce those numbers.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun June 30, 2013 4:35 pm

Between 3,000 and 4,000 people die in large truck and bus crashes every year in America, according to the Department of Transportation, which also says 13 percent of those deaths were caused by fatigued drivers.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration wants to see those numbers go down, so the enforcement of a new set of rules starts Monday.

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Pop Culture
2:22 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

Sixty Years Of The Corvette

Originally published on Sun June 30, 2013 4:35 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

We'll stay out on the open road for this next historical note. 60 years ago today, the first Corvette rolled off the production line. Ever since, they've earned about as many admiring stares as they have speeding tickets, and they're a constant inspiration for screen and song.

(SOUNDBITE OF ADVERTISEMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Yep, there she is: A real dream buggy. The Corvette: Speed, class, looks.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SHUT DOWN")

THE BEACH BOYS: (Singing) Yeah, my fuel injected Stingray and a 413.

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Author Interviews
1:05 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

How One Woman Nearly Deciphered A Mysterious Script

An ancient tablet contains records written in Linear B — a script that was discovered in the 19th century and remained undeciphered for decades.
Sharon Mollerus Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 9:17 am

Critics have called Margalit Fox's new book, The Riddle of the Labyrinth, a paleographic detective procedural. It follows the story of the laborious quest to crack a mysterious script, unearthed in Crete in 1900, known by the sterile-sounding name Linear B.

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The Two-Way
1:02 pm
Sun June 30, 2013

LOOKING BACK: RFK's 'Ripple Of Hope' Speech In South Africa

A Meeting Of Great Minds: During his 1966 visit to South Africa, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy met with anti-apartheid activist Chief Luthuli and later spoke publicly about their meeting. Because of a government ban on media coverage of Luthuli, it was the first news many had of their leader in more than five years.
Shoreline Productions

At South Africa's University of Cape Town on Sunday, President Obama noted that he was speaking at the same place where, in 1966, then-Sen. Robert Kennedy, D-N.Y., delivered what some historians believe was the best speech of his life.

Obama was discussing about how, as a young man, he had come to believe that "I could be part of something bigger than myself; that my own salvation was bound up with those of others."

Then the president brought up the late senator:

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The Two-Way
11:35 am
Sun June 30, 2013

Snowden Is 'A Hero,' WikiLeaks' Assange Says

From one secrets leaker to another:

Edward Snowden "is a hero," WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said Sunday on ABC-TV's This Week with George Stephanopoulos. "He has told the people of the world and the United States that there is mass unlawful interception of their communications, far beyond anything that happened under Nixon."

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Parallels
10:59 am
Sun June 30, 2013

Russians Look Online To Celebrate Gay Pride

Riot police guard gay rights activists who were beaten by anti-gay protesters during an authorized gay rights rally in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Saturday. While a march there was allowed to go ahead, gay rights activists in Moscow turned to the Web on Sunday to celebrate gay pride.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 7:37 am

San Francisco, New York and other cities across the country and the globe are hosting gay pride festivals this weekend, capping off a week of legal decisions cheered by advocates for gay rights.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Sun June 30, 2013

Justice Kennedy Denies Request To Halt Same-Sex Marriages

Lining up to be married: Adam Chandler, 33, left, and Ivan Chandler, 38, both of Citrus Heights, were among those waiting in line Saturday to get married at San Francisco City Hall.
Doug Duran/Bay Area News Group MCT/Landov

Originally published on Sun June 30, 2013 3:36 pm

(Most recent update: 4:30 p.m. ET.)

Supporters of California's Proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriages lost another argument Sunday when Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy turned down their request to at least temporarily bar such marriages in the state.

The Associated Press and Reuters report that Kennedy denied the petition "with no additional comment."

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The Two-Way
9:52 am
Sun June 30, 2013

Jennifer Lopez Sorry She Sang For Turkmenistan's Dictator

Jennifer Lopez on stage Saturday in Avaza, Turkmenistan.
Igor Sasin AFP/Getty Images

Here's how the State Department's latest human rights report about the Central Asian nation of Turkmenistan begins:

"Although the constitution declares Turkmenistan to be a secular democracy and a presidential republic, the country has an authoritarian government controlled by the president, Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedov."

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The Two-Way
8:58 am
Sun June 30, 2013

Kerry Sees 'Real Progress' After Latest Mideast Trip

Secretary of State John Kerry on Sunday in the West Bank city of Ramallah.
Issam Rimawi APA/Landov

(NPR's Emily Harris files this report from Jerusalem.)

Peace between Palestinians and Israelis? No? Progress? After four days of shuttle diplomacy, Secretary of State John Kerry says the two sides are getting closer to peace negotiations.

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Europe
8:48 am
Sun June 30, 2013

Prime Minister's 'Loose Cannon' Style Divides Greece

Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras speaks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel during an EU summit in Brussels last week. Samaras began his term by refusing to negotiate with with EU leaders, but now calls Merkel an ally.
Yves Logghe AP

Originally published on Sun June 30, 2013 9:58 am

Antonis Samaras became prime minister of Greece a year ago, when the world assumed his country, battered by debt and austerity, would exit the eurozone.

European leaders were openly relieved that Samaras' conservative, pro-bailout New Democracy Party eked out a victory in elections last June over the leftist, anti-bailout Syriza Party.

"Today, the Greek people express their will to stay anchored with the euro, remain an integral part of the eurozone, honor the country's commitments and foster growth," Samaras said that night. "This is a victory for all Europe."

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Sun June 30, 2013

'Furious' EU Demands Answers After New Report Of NSA Spying

European Union flags fly in front of the organization's headquarters in Brussels.
Wu Wei Xinhua/Landov

"Senior European Union officials are outraged by revelations that the U.S. spied on EU representations in Washington and New York," Germany's Der Spiegel writes. "Some have called for a suspension of talks on the trans-Atlantic free trade agreement."

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