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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Anti-Doping Chief: Armstrong Knows Truth, Is Holding On To 'Baseless Soundbites'

United States Anti-Doping Agency Chief Executive Officer Travis Tygart, right, during a subcommittee hearing on drug use in sports in 2008.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 4:47 pm

The head of the United States Anti-Doping Agency says Lance Armstrong knows the truth and he has decided that instead of airing every piece of evidence publicly and in front of an impartial court, the dethroned seven-time Tour de France winner has decided to "hold on to baseless soundbites."

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Shots - Health Blog
11:30 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Failure Of Lilly Drug Is Latest Alzheimer's Setback

A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease.
U.S. National Institute on Aging Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 12:19 pm

An experimental drug that aimed to slow the development of plaques and help clear them from the brains of Alzheimer's patients failed in two late-stage studies conducted by Eli Lilly & Co., the company said today.

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Fri August 24, 2012

U.S. Drone Strike Kills 18 In Pakistan, Security Officials Say

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:24 am

Pakistani security officials say that a United States drone strike has killed 18 suspected militants today in the northwest part of the country. The attack is the fifth of its kind in a week.

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Environment
10:48 am
Fri August 24, 2012

'Carbon Nation' Tackles Climate Change, By Ignoring It

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. How much do you personally worry about global warming? The people at the Gallup Poll have been asking that question every year since 1989, and according to their latest polling figures, there's been a bit of an uptick in the numbers: 55 percent said they worry about climate change - that's up about four points from last year.

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History
10:45 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Mapping The Birthplace Of Modern Languages

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

When you hear somebody speaking Polish, another person speaking Persian, they sound like totally different languages, don't they? But listen more closely and you'll hear similarities, like how one of the Persian words for mother is mada, and in Polish, it's matka. That's because both languages belong to a large family known as the Indo-European languages. A group that contains over 400 languages and dialects: Polish, Persian, English, French, German, Russian, Icelandic. The list goes on.

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Science
10:41 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Tree Rings Tell Tales Of Ancient Fires And Climate

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. Last week, I was in southern Idaho, and it was snowing in August, or at least it looked like it. Actually, it was raining ash, closing down airports, forcing people to remain inside, many miles away from the forest fire flames.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Now They're Even? Romney Gets In 'Birth Certificate' Quip

But seriously, folks: Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney joked about birth certificates today in Commerce, Mich.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

In Commerce, Mich., today, The Associated Press reports, Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney told supporters that he and his wife, Ann, had been born in nearby hospitals. Then, Romney added, "no one's ever asked to see my birth certificate; they know that this is the place where both of us were born and raised."

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Humans
10:39 am
Fri August 24, 2012

David Eagleman Gets Inside Our Heads

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. Up next, discovering the universe inside your skull, and it is a universe. According to my next guest, a single cubic centimeter of brain tissue contains as many nerve connections as there are stars in the Milky Way - billions and billions just in a tiny bit of your brain. Never mind the other three pounds of brain matter. It's a vast world inside our skulls, and much of it operates without us really knowing or thinking much about it or even understanding it.

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Space
10:36 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Curiosity Rover Zaps A Rock, Starts To Roll

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow.

(APPLAUSE)

FLATOW: Yup, they were cheering again this week at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Mars Rover Curiosity made its first moves on the Red Planet. It wiggled its wheels, and it's rolling away from the landing site, toward a spot called Glenelg, actually you can spell it backwards and forwards the same way because it's going to return there.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:15 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Dire Health Conditions In South Sudan Prompt Airdrops

Families wait for hours to register at the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan along the northern border in early July. Within a few weeks, the population of the camp more than doubled, leading to shortages of food, water and medicine.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:32 pm

It's been only a year since South Sudan became an independent nation. But as NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reported last month, the young county is already facing major challenges.

One of these is a growing population of refugees at the northern border, where conditions have become so dire in the past few weeks that aid workers are now calling it a "health catastrophe."

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Movie Reviews
9:48 am
Fri August 24, 2012

How Brazil Lives Now, In 'Neighboring Sounds'

Joao (Gustavo Jahn) and Sofia (Irma Brown) are among the inhabitants of the Recife, Brazil, street where Neighboring Sounds takes place.
Victor Juca Cinema Guild

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:39 pm

Between mass tourism and the Internet, it's never been easier to learn about other cultures. Yet we often stay on the surface. Watching the Olympics opening ceremony a few weeks ago, I was struck by how much of what was presented as quintessential Britishness came from pop culture — James Bond and Mary Poppins and the chorus to "Hey Jude." Although Britain had a global empire not that long ago, the show's director, Danny Boyle, grasped that the world's image of his green and pleasant land now largely derives from movies and songs.

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The Two-Way
9:35 am
Fri August 24, 2012

ACT Says A Quarter Of High Schoolers Are College Ready

The people at ACT, best known for the assesment test taken by many college-bound high schoolers, have finished crunching 2012 numbers and they report that just 25 percent of high schoolers who took the test are college ready.

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Participation Nation
9:33 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Taking Care In Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Community service in Alabama.
Courtesy of UA

One of the first activities of the new school year at the University of Alabama is Hands On Tuscaloosa, a morning of community service. On Sat., Aug. 25, students can choose to refurbish a neighborhood baseball diamond, clean-up a local high school, create a carnival or do something else worthwhile.

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Fri August 24, 2012

At Penn State, New Students Weigh Stigma Of Scandal

Signs on display around town are designed to show support for Penn State's football team as a new season begins.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 4:47 pm

A freshman class is arriving at Penn State this week. But a child sexual abuse scandal that rocked the school last fall is casting a shadow over the school's "Welcome Week."

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U.S.
8:56 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Details Emerge In Shooting By Empire State Building

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 8:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Today's shooting in New York City draws special attention because of the location: at the base of the Empire State Building, perhaps the most famous building in New York, one of the most famous buildings in the world. The gunman opened fire there. Several people were shot and wounded. We're getting conflicting accounts of how many, although news photographs from the scene do show a number of people down on the ground.

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Author Interviews
8:29 am
Fri August 24, 2012

'Incognito': What's Hiding In The Unconscious Mind

Dr. David Eagleman is a neuroscientist and writer. He directs the Laboratory of Perception and Action at Baylor College of Medicine.
Sharon Steinmann Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the University of Texas, Houston Medical School

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 9:48 am

This interview was originally broadcast on May 31, 2011. David Eagleman's Incognito is now out in paperback.

Your brain doesn't like to keep secrets. Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, have shown that writing down secrets in a journal or telling a doctor your secrets actually decreases the level of stress hormones in your body. Keeping a secret, meanwhile, does the opposite.

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Election 2012
8:15 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Who Best Represents American Catholics?

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 9:03 am

Catholics are considered one of the most important swing groups in the country. Now, for the first time in history, both major political parties have Catholic vice presidential candidates. Guest host Viviana Hurtado discusses the Catholic voting bloc with pollster Robert Jones and conservative Catholic blogger Gayle Trotter.

Economy
8:15 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Will Dreamers Help Or Hurt The Economy?

There's a debate going on about whether President Obama's deferred action program for undocumented workers will help boost the economy, or hurt it. Guest host Viviana Hurtado hears two opposing views from Muzaffar Chishti of the Migration Policy Institute, and Vanderbilt University law professor Carol Swain.

The Salt
8:08 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Arty Students, Not Party Students, Are Champs Of Late-Night Food Delivery

Art students rule the campus late-night delivery field. Maybe they're studying the packages.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 7:55 am

Millions of college students are heading back to campus soon, and as any parent footing the bill knows, they're hungry for more than just knowledge — they want food, and lots of it, at all hours.

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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Two Dead After Shooting Near Empire State Building

One of the blocked off streets near the scene of today's shooting outside the Empire State Building.
Jim O'Grady WNYC

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 8:53 am

A shooting near the iconic Empire State Building this morning has left two people dead — one of them the gunman who first opened fire — and has shut down streets around that Manhattan landmark.

Police do not believe there's any link to terrorism. Instead, they suspect the gunman had some sort of work-related grievance.

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