Sports
3:05 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

NASCAR Nastiness Results In Sport's Biggest Fine Ever

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Finally this hour, NASCAR nastiness. This past Saturday, one team appeared to pull out all the stops to rig a big race. One driver spun out his car, and another took an unnecessary pit stop. Both moves helped advance their teammate to the playoffs. NASCAR fined their team - Michael Waltrip Racing - $300,000, and suspended their general manager indefinitely.

Now, this is the biggest fine in NASCAR history, according to Nate Ryan. He's a senior motorsports reporter for USA Today Sports. He joins us from Charlotte, N.C. Hey there, Nate.

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Environment
3:05 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Dust Bowl Worries Swirl Up As Shelterbelt Buckles

A Dust Bowl farmer digs out a fence post to keep it from being buried under drifting sand in Cimarron County, Okla., in 1936.
Arthur Rothstein Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:39 pm

In the 1930s, the Dust Bowl ravaged crops and helped plunge the U.S. into an environmental and economic depression. Farmland in parts of Texas, Kansas, Nebraska and the Dakotas disappeared.

After the howling winds passed and the dust settled, federal foresters planted 100 million trees across the Great Plains, forming a giant windbreak — known as a shelterbelt — that stretched from Texas to Canada.

Now, those trees are dying from drought, leaving some to worry whether another Dust Bowl might swirl up again.

An Experiment That Worked

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Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New HIV Cases Spotlight Adult Film Industry's Testing System

Michael Weinstein of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation (left) at a press conference in February to introduce AB 332, a statewide bill to require condom use by adult film performers.
Bret Hartman AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:49 pm

Adult film production in California is now suspended after a number of performers tested positive for HIV. Four cases have been reported in the past few months, including one on Monday.

If ever there was an "I told you so moment" for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, it's now. The organization has been campaigning for condoms to be mandatory during porn shoots. Last year, it sponsored a measure in Los Angeles County to that effect, which voters approved.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Study Says America's Income Gap Widest Since Great Depression

John Moore Getty Images

The gap between the 1 percent and the 99 percent is growing, according to an analysis of IRS figures by an international group of university economists, and it hasn't been so wide since 1928.

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Code Switch
3:00 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Harlem On Their Minds: Life In America's Black Capital

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 6:38 pm

The poet Langston Hughes liked to wryly describe the Harlem Renaissance — the years from just after World War I until the Depression when black literature and art flourished, fed by an awakening racial pride — as "the period when the Negro was in vogue." Note the past tense. Two new books published Tuesday explore the blossoming of black cultural life in two different decades.

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The Salt
2:44 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Small Plates To Join Olive Garden's Never-Ending Bowls

Olive Garden's chicken scampi dish is on the regular carb-heavy menu.
AnneCN Flickr

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:39 am

Should you want to super-size your meal (and boost your social status in the process), plenty of American restaurant chains would be more than happy to have you dine with them. Olive Garden, for one, is currently in the middle of a "Never Ending Pasta Bowl" promotion. According to the chain's Twitter feed, it has served more than 5.3 million bowls of "unlimited" pasta with soup and salad for $9.99 since Aug. 5.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:17 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New York City's 'People's Opera' May Face Its Final Curtain

Pamela Armstrong (left) as Alice Ford and Heather Johnson as Meg Page in New York City Opera's production of Falstaff. The so called people's opera may have to cancel its upcoming season if fundraising falls short.
Carol Rosegg New York City Opera

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:15 pm

There are a lot of operas that end with heroines on their deathbeds, singing one glorious aria before they die. That's what happens at the end of Anna Nicole, the controversial new work that New York City Opera is presenting at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in September. But the company's artistic director and general manager, George Steel, says it could also be City Opera's last gasp.

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

In A Pickle With Chef Kathy Gunst

(Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:07 pm

Want to use up some leftover produce? Well, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst has been noticing that fermented is in!

Not only the common bread and butter pickle, but also pickled peppers, green beans and pickled fruits like cherries and peaches. She says that making a simple refrigerator pickle is a great way to use produce because it’s so easy.

“Pickling is to cooking what maybe like a really easy paint-by-number is to making art,” Gunst said.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Research Shows Microbes Are Crucial To Our Health

There are trillions of microbes living in and on our bodies. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms. And a growing body of evidence indicates that these bugs aren’t bad for us. In fact, it looks like they’re vital for our health.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Grandparents Raising Kids Hit Roadblocks In School Enrollment

Across the country, it’s becoming increasingly common for grandparents to raise their grandchildren.

That can be troublesome when these same grandparents try to enroll the children in school.

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