The Protojournalist
8:13 am
Sat February 22, 2014

A Life Story In 6 Songs — Part 1

Amy Bailey

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 2:41 pm

Tons of people responded — thoughtfully, wittily, smartly, poignantly — to NPR's recent request: Tell us the six songs of your life.

Sifting through the more than 1,000 annotated playlists, we came up with a few that seem exemplary of the original idea: People telling the stories of their lives — up to this point — through a half-dozen songs.

We were knocked out by the variety of the selections.

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The Edge
7:17 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Getting Technical: Questions And Answers About The Winter Olympics

American Bode Miller inspired a question about terminal velocity, resistance, and friction with his skiing in Sochi. It's one of many technical questions that came up during the Winter Olympics.
Olivier Morin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 7:41 pm

Events in the Winter Olympics can be highly technical, with arcane rules and specialized equipment that can defy easy explanation. On the question-and-answer site Quora, several interesting topics have come up in recent days, from why athletes use tape on their sleds to how a human can surpass 80 mph on skis.

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The Edge
7:16 am
Sat February 22, 2014

U.S. Olympic Officials: It Wasn't Suits That Hurt Speedskaters

Speedskaters from the U.S., Brian Hansen (from left), Jonathan Kuck and Joey Mantia, compete in the team pursuit speedskating race for seventh place at the Adler Arena Skating Center on Saturday.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 4:55 am

America's performance in the 2014 Winter Games has been solid, if not spectacular. Team USA has managed to stay at or near the top of the medal heap in Sochi for most of the games.

But big names like snowboarder Shaun White, speed skater Shani Davis, skier Bode Miller and both U.S. hockey teams have disappointed when they were expected by many experts to dominate. (With hockey, however, it might have been more hope than actual expectation of gold.)

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Simon Says
6:58 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Ukrainian Olympic Skier's Stand Is A Sacrifice For Her Country

Ukrainian skier Bogdana Matsotska decided not to compete in Friday's slalom race, in a show of solidarity with protesters in Kiev.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:06 am

Sports are supposed to be separate from politics, but athletes and games can't always be kept separate from life and death.

Scores of people were killed in Ukraine this week, as the security forces of President Viktor Yanukovich opened fire on anti-government protesters in Kiev's Maidan, now called Independence Square.

While some 800 miles away, more than 40 Ukrainian athletes have been skiing, skating, working hard to win medals at the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.

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Summer Reading: Kids
5:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

The Last Undefeated College Basketball Team Plays For Title

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:06 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Wichita State's basketball team is the last undefeated men's team in America - 28 wins. That got them on one of the regional covers of Sports Illustrated, and that adds a little pressure. If the Shockers win tonight, they'll clinch the Missouri Valley Conference title. From member station KMUW in Wichita, Carla Eckels reports on the team's winning season.

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Sports
5:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Olympics Serve Up A Surfeit Of Strife On Ice

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:06 am

While the 2014 Winter Olympics are coming to an end, there are still opportunities to take home the gold. Reporter Tom Goldman joins NPR's Scott Simon to talk about ice hockey and the speed skating.

Books News & Features
5:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

'The Natural' Of 1952 Holds Lessons For Today's MLB

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:06 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There's an old baseball legend about the kid out of nowhere who boards a train for a tryout in Chicago with nothing but his toothbrush and a bat he calls Wonderboy. The kid strikes out the Whammer, the best hitter in the game, but gets to his hotel and opens his door to a pretty girl. Wham, bam, she shoots him in the stomach and he doesn't make a comeback for 15 years.

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Politics
5:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Should The U.S. Choose Sides In Syria? A Democrat Says 'Yes'

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:06 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The dying and suffering in Syria gets worse every week, even as turmoil in other areas demands coverage, too. Last September 10th, President Obama seemed to make the case for U.S. involvement following Bashar al-Assad's use of chemical weapons against civilians. This is not a world we should accept, said the president. It is in the national security interests of the United States to respond to the Assad regime's use of chemical weapons through a targeted military strike.

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Politics
5:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

A Republican View: U.S. Military Should Play No Role In Syria

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 11:08 am

Some in Congress believe sending aid to Syria's opposition forces will drag the U.S. into a war it can't win. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., about his adamant stance.

Religion
5:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Meet The New Pope, Mostly The Same As The Old Popes

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:06 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

So, we just heard a number of people believe Pope Francis is changing to change the tone at the Vatican. There are others who don't agree. George Weigel is a theologian at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. He wrote a biography of Pope John Paul II called "Witness to Hope." And he believes that Pope Francis is remarkably similar to his predecessors, Pope John Paul and Pope Benedict.

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