Government & Politics
1:17 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

U.S. Supreme Court Won't Delay Release of Thousands of California Inmates

file photo
Credit Flickr user Mark Fischer / Creative Commons License / Flickr.com

The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to delay the release of thousands of inmates from California’s prisons. In a decision announced today the Justices denied a stay requested by Governor Jerry Brown. Brown is fighting a ruling from a federal three-judge-panel that orders California to reduce its prison population by about 10-thousand inmates by the end of the year. Three Justices voted to grant the stay.

Attorney Mike Bien represents inmates involved in the court case. He says the decision is significant because it appears the state was gambling everything on this stay.

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NPR Story
1:13 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

'Whitey' Bulger Won't Testify, But He Didn't Finish Quietly

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 2:19 pm

In Boston Friday, former mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger said he would not take the stand in his criminal trial and that his defense would rest. But before that happened, he railed at the judge and his defense team.

NPR Story
1:13 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

N.C. Abortion Law Sparks Protest; Governor Responds With Cookies

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 2:19 pm

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory sent out a plate of cookies to abortion law protesters who had gathered outside the governor's mansion on Tuesday. Audie Cornish speaks with Mary C. Curtis, who writes for the Washington Posts' blog She the People, about the incident and North Carolina politics.

Music Interviews
1:13 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

The Civil Wars' Joy Williams On The Duo's Fragile Bond

Joy Williams and John Paul White of The Civil Wars. The duo's new, self-titled album arrives on the heels of canceled tour dates and an ongoing hiatus from performing together.
Tec Petaja Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:03 pm

The singing duo The Civil Wars is engaged in a civil war of its own.

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U.S.
1:13 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

The Old Gig: Catching Frogs On Warm Summer Nights

Tommy Peebles shines a light on the pond. With the help of Bick Boyte, the two Tennesseans catch frogs with homemade "gigs" for a frog leg fry they hold every year.
Stephen Jerkins for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 4:05 pm

Bick Boyte plops a 1-pound bullfrog in his aluminum canoe, still half alive. He resumes his kneeling position, perched upfront, on the hunt for a big bellower. Boyte hears the "wom, wom, wom" and knows frogs are within reach.

Boyte and Tommy Peebles have been "gigging" Tennessee ponds together since their daddies first taught them. Boyte now owns a truck dealership. Peebles is a real estate lawyer. But in the warm moonlight, they revert to their boyhoods. Peebles does the paddling.

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Code Switch
12:43 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Research Says: Actually, Where You Go To College Matters

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:08 pm

There are lots of questions for high school grads: Should you go for an associate degree or a bachelor's? A community college or a four-year university? Does it really matter where you go? If we're comparing top-tier schools with open-access ones, then yes. It matters a whole lot, and it has long-lasting effects.

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The Two-Way
12:14 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

House Votes To Quash Obamacare, For The 40th Time

The chamber of the House of Representatives.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 12:20 pm

The House of Representatives voted Friday to suppress President Obama's signature legislative accomplishment for the 40th time since the law was passed in 2010.

The vote to gut the Affordable Care Act — or Obamacare — was a near-party-line 232-185 vote. And like the previous 39 times, this is a symbolic vote, because the Democratic-controlled Senate will not take up the measure.

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Shots - Health News
12:13 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Could Hotter Temperatures From Climate Change Boost Violence?

A police officer guards Cambodia's famed temple of Angkor Wat. The powerful city-state collapsed in 1431 after suffering through two decades of droughts.
Heng Sinith AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:48 pm

Rates of homicide and other violent crimes often spike in cities during heat waves. People get cranky. Tempers flare.

So as the Earth gets hotter because of climate change, will it also become more violent?

Many scientists have thought so. And now a team of economists offers the first quantitative estimates for just how much weather changes might amplify human conflict.

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NPR Story
11:54 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Chef Kathy Gunst Brings Recipes From Alaska

Kathy paddles out onto Tutka Bay in Alaska. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 7:09 am

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NPR Story
11:53 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Fentanyl Overdoses Worry Pennsylvania Officials

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 1:59 pm

So far this year, 50 people have died in Pennsylvania from fentanyl-related overdoses.

Fentanyl is a prescription drug — an opiate more powerful than morphine.

It is often used to treat cancer patients experiencing extreme pain. An illicit, non-prescription version of fentanyl led to hundreds of deaths in Pennsylvania in 2006.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Elana Gordon of WHYY reports that state health and drug enforcement officials are worried it’s on the rise again.

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