U.S.
12:26 am
Thu September 5, 2013

More Cities Sweeping Homeless Into Less Prominent Areas

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:58 am

In North Carolina, a fight is brewing over the homeless in the capital city of Raleigh. Elected leaders have asked charitable and religious groups to stop their long-standing tradition of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends.

But advocates for the poor say the city is trying to push the homeless out of a neighborhood that business leaders want to spruce up.

'I Will Arrest You'

Almost every day, the Rev. Hugh Hollowell walks through Moore Square, a centuries-old city park in downtown Raleigh.

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Author Interviews
12:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

'Winter's Bone' Author Revisits A Tragedy In His Ozarks Hometown

Daniel Woodrell's novel Winter's Bone -- a dark family saga set in the Ozarks — was adapted into a film in 2010. Woodrell returned to his hometown of West Plains, Mo., about 20 years ago and has been writing there ever since.
Alexander Klein AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:42 pm

The Ozarks mountain town of West Plains, Mo., is the kind of town where a person can stand in his front yard and have a comfortable view of his past.

"My mom was actually born about 150 or 200 feet that way, and my grandfather's house is I guess 200 yards that way," says Daniel Woodrell, author of Winter's Bone, and most recently, The Maid's Version.

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Around the Nation
12:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Forget Twitter. In St. Louis, Bare Your Soul Via Typewriter

Goldkamp also keeps an index card file of choice words to integrate into his poem when he has trouble finding the right words.
Erin Williams STL Public Radio

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:10 pm

Typically, 21st century writers fall into two technical categories: Mac or PC. But poet Henry Goldkamp would much rather use a typewriter. He's the sole owner of a mobile poetry business, and for the past three years, he's spent his weekends traveling St. Louis, banging out short poems, on the spot, for anyone who stops by his table.

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Around the Nation
12:23 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Under Dust And Rust, 'New' Classic Cars Go Up For Auction

Chevrolets are lined up in a field near the Lambrecht Chevrolet dealership in Pierce, Neb. Later this month, bidders will attend a two-day auction that will feature about 500 old cars and trucks, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:11 pm

Inside the Lambrecht Chevrolet Company in tiny Pierce, Neb., under layers of dirt, sit a dozen classic cars. A 1978 Chevrolet Indy Pace Car, black with racing stripes down the side. There's a '66 Bel Air sedan in a color called tropic turquoise, and a 1964 impala.

"If you wipe away the dirt, it's shiny underneath," says auctioneer Yvette VanDerBrink. Even though this car is almost 50 years old, VanDerBrink says, it's still brand new.

Later this month Lambrecht's will auction more than 500 classic cars, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer.

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NPR Story
10:09 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Party Drug 'Molly' Sparks Concerns

(tanjila/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 1:24 pm

This summer at least four young people attending music events in New York, Boston and Seattle died, apparently after taking the party drug “molly.”

Molly, or MDMA, is the chemical in ecstasy, the 1990s club drug.

It’s very popular these days because it is perceived to be purer than ecstasy and it induces a feeling of euphoria and empathy towards others.

But because it’s often sold in powder form, it can be adulterated with other substances and many users aren’t aware of that.

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NPR Story
10:07 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Is The Restaurant Tipping Model Bad For Waitstaff?

(alberth2/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 1:24 pm

Does tipping in restaurants improve service and bring in much-needed revenue for waitstaff?

Or is it, alternatively, an archaic practice that does nothing to improve service, results in overall lower wages for waiters and waitresses and creates a pay disparity with other kitchen staff?

We ask food writer Corby Kummer of The Atlantic and Boston Magazine.

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Education
6:27 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

California Bill Would Immediately Begin New Academic Test Standards

file photo
Credit Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

A bill that would immediately start phasing in California’s new computer based standardized school achievement assessment has passed out of a key senate committee. The bill would allow most districts to opt-out of the old system.

The new Common Core academic standards will be in place this academic year. Assembly member Susan Bonilla authored the bill. She says it gives most districts a chance to evaluate students based on those standards now.

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Government & Politics
6:18 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Prisons Battle Heats Up at California Capitol

Credit Photo used under Creative Commons from Andy Patterson / Modern Relics / http://www.flickr.com/photos/modernrelics/4461010654/

California Senate Democrats have approved their own plan to deal with the federal court order to reduce prison overcrowding.  They pushed their proposal through the Senate Budget Committee today over the objections of Republicans and Governor Jerry Brown.

Corrections Secretary Jeff Beard lobbied strongly for Brown’s plan, known as Senate Bill 105.  It would increase capacity by contracting out beds from county, private and out-of-state facilities.

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The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Racist Remark Leads To Spat Between Anthony Weiner, Voter

Anthony Weiner argues with a voter.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:56 pm

Anthony Weiner, the former congressman and now New York City mayoral candidate, continues to be embroiled in drama: Throughout the day, a video circled the Internet that showed a fierce confrontation between him and a Jewish voter.

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Code Switch
4:37 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

College Enrollment Drops Overall, But Spikes Among Latinos

The number of Latino college students has been on a steady uptick since the mid-2000s.
Michael DeLeon iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 7:30 am

Here's the latest dispatch from our country's changing classrooms: Overall, there were half a million fewer students nationwide enrolled in colleges between 2011 and 2012, but the number of Latinos enrolled in college over the same period jumped by 447,000. The numbers come from a recent U.S. Census Bureau report.

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