With the current controversy over how much it will cost to actually build high speed rail, there’s been relatively little discussion about what Californians are actually getting with the planned bullet train. And when it comes to how the train system will function in the lives of passengers, the role of high speed rail stations becomes even more important.

KSEE 24’s Evan Onstot joined us on Valley Edition to talk about local politics, the row over bonuses paid out to top City of Fresno employees and high speed rail.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Ezra David Romero explores why Tulare County is considering red tagging drought stricken rental homes. Later we speak with Eric Eidlin on how German high speed rail compares to plans for California High Speed Rail. Eidlin is a regional policy fellow of the German Marshall Fund and works for the Federal Transit Administration.

High Speed Rail Authority

Will California’s high-speed rail system be German enough?

That question is not a joke, as I learned last month while riding Germany’s popular high-speed rail. In fact, it’s a more important question than the ones Californians have been myopically asking for years about the costs, funding, and construction deadlines of the state’s controversial project.

State Insists High-Speed Rail Remains On Track

Nov 6, 2015
Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

After appearing to pick up steam this year, California's ambitious high-speed rail project hit a snag this week. Opponents are accusing the High-Speed Rail Authority of hiding higher cost estimates. The state insists that costs remain on track, although the trains may not be ready to run on time. Ben Bradford reports from Sacramento.

In January, after years of delays and legal battles, Governor Jerry Brown finally celebrated the groundbreaking for California’s High Speed Rail line.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A group of station supporters celebrated in Clovis on Thursday as workers lifted the last major piece of the exterior structure into place on Valley Public Radio's new home. The "topping off" ceremony is the latest milestone in construction of the new facility. Before the last beam was installed by workers with Fresno-based Zumwalt Construction, attendees were invited to sign the steel girder. 

Police: UC Merced Stabbings Not Terrorism

Nov 5, 2015

UPDATE: 6:22 PM - Authorities say they now know what prompted UC Merced student Faisal Mohammad to go on a stabbing rampage Wednesday, leaving four others injured. 

According to Merced County Sheriff Vern Warnke, a manifesto found on Mohammad's body during the autopsy indicates he was upset at fellow students after being kicked out of a campus study group. The manifesto contained the names of intended victims and a detailed, minute-by-minute account of his planned attack. 

Diana Aguilera / Valley Public Radio

Authorities are continuing their investigation this morning into yesterday’s stabbing of four people at UC Merced. While law enforcement agencies including the FBI are trying to piece together exactly what happened, FM89’s Diana Aguilera reports the event has rocked the campus.

Ever since UC Merced opened its doors in 2005 it’s been known as a quiet, tight knit campus community. But that all changed early Wednesday.

Freshman Norma Ambriz was in her morning chemistry class when the chaos started.

Diana Aguilera / Valley Public Radio

UPDATED: 5:56 PM - FM89's Diana Aguilera reports on what law enforcement officials know about the suspect.

Go Inside Valley Public Radio's New Home

Nov 3, 2015

Construction on Valley Public Radio's new home is moving inside, as work on the exterior framing is now nearly complete. Workers are already installing the fire sprinkler system and HVAC ducts, as well as rough electrical work. There's still some interior framing left to do, but the overall interior spaces are now becoming very clear.