News

CDC Technology Advances Promise Better Valley Fever Detection

Nov 21, 2016
THE CENTER FOR HEALTH JOURNALISM COLLABORATIVE

New technology could reveal the microscopic, sometimes deadly spores that cause valley fever that currently float in the air undetected. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is developing a sensor that can detect levels of the cocci fungus in the air and soil, said Christopher Braden, deputy director of the CDC’s National Center for Emerging Zoonotic Infectious Diseases branch. The agency has been working on the technology for three years, and Braden is hopeful the...

Kerry Klein/KVPR

We continue our reporting this week on the fungal disease known as valley fever with a story about a potential route to prevention. One of the first lines of defense against any disease is determining who’s at risk. It’s possible to develop immunity to valley fever, and a new skin test could be used to screen for that immunity—but that’s only if the test overcomes some major hurdles. Faith Herrod wants to be a veterinarian when she grows up. The 11-year-old lives in the small Central...

Proterra

Communities like Kerman, Firebaugh, Selma and Kingsburg will soon have an eco friendly transit option. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports. With a goal of improving air quality in the Valley the Ca lifornia Air Resources Board is providing funding for 15 zero-emission electric buses from a company called Proterra . Kent Leacock runs government relations for the group. He says the project will eliminate 15 tons of greenhouse gases in the region. “They’re also saving money for their respected...

VINOTHCHANDAR VIA FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Health organizations in Fresno County today announced a new initiative to reduce premature births. Right now, 11.1 percent of births in the county occur earlier than 37 weeks—that‘s far more than the state average of 8.3 percent. The new initiative, a collaboration between Fresno State, UC San Francisco, Fresno County and other groups and agencies, endeavors to reduce that to only 7 percent by the year 2025. Sandra Flores of Fresno State is the director of the initiative. "We know that babies...

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

We talk politics in a special post-election Valley Edition this week. Should the media and political establishment put so much emphasis on predictive polling? What does a Trump administration mean for the Central Valley, and for local GOP leaders like Kevin McCarthy and Devin Nunes? And what do local races and voter turnout tell us about future campaigns? We talked with our panel of political experts: Fresno State political science professor Lisa Bryant , KSEE-24's Evan Onstot and the Fresno...

Courtesy KABC Los Angeles / Center For Health Journalism Collaborative

Valley fever has long been a major health concern for people who live in the San Joaquin Valley. A fungus that grows in the soil can become airborne. If inhaled it can cause serious health issues, even death in some cases, though most people who contract the disease have a mild case, and they don’t even know they’ve had it. Now cases of the disease are up significantly in Kern County and some say it is connected to California's weather patterns. It's one theory explored in the first report of...

http://www.alatestyleoffire.com/home.html

Fresno is known for poetry. Perhaps it's because of unique hardships encountered here, but it's also thanks to poets like Pulitzer-Prize winning poet Philip Levine and others like current U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera. The Fresno State Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing is celebrating another noteworthy poet and alumnus of Fresno State with a screening of the new documentary “A Late Style of Fire: Larry Levis, American Poet ." Larry Levis graduated from Fresno State in...

Valley Public Radio

On this week's special two hour Valley Edition our reporting team takes a look at the issues of valley fever, folic acid in corn masa and LGBT healthcare in rural California. We also are joined by the Fresno Bee's John Ellis, Fresno State's Lisa Bryant and KSEE 24's Evan Onstot for an election recap with VE host Joe Moore. Later in the show we'll hear about Lori Clune's book " Executing the Rosenbergs: Death and Diplomacy in a Cold War World ." We'll also hear about a new documentary called "...

Oxford University Press

It was one of the biggest scandals the country had ever seen - the theft of U.S. government secrets about the atomic bomb that wound up in the hands of the Soviet Union. The federal government eventually tried and executed Julius and Ethel Rosenberg for conspiracy, sparking an international outcry. Now the story of the Rosenbergs is back in the news, as there is an effort underway to seek a presidential pardon in their case. There’s also a new book about their trial by Fresno State professor...

Asleep at the Wheel

Ray Benson is one of the greatest living practitioners of western swing - a mix of country, jazz and boogie-woogie that has delighted audience worldwide since the days of Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys. This weekend Benson brings his band to the Crystal Palace in Bakersfield, a town that was home to two of his other musical heroes - Merle Haggard and Buck Owens. Benson talked with us on Valley Edition about the legacy of Bob Wills and the lasting appeal of western swing.

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