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Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we start the show with a report from Ezra David Romero about how warming temperatures are making it hard for trees to get enough sleep. We also hear from KVPR's Jeffrey Hess about suicide prevention in the region. Bakersfield Californian Reporter Lois Henry also chimes in on the topic. Later in the program we are joined by Fresno Bee Reporter Mackenzie Mays for a conversation about Fresno Unified. We end the program with our latest installment of our podcast Outdoorsy. This time we go go underground. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

The valley’s fruit and nut trees need cold temperatures in the winter in order to go to sleep and wake up healthy in the spring. New research suggests that in as little as 30 years, it may be too warm in the valley to grow these trees due to climate change. Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero reports that the agriculture industry is taking the issue very seriously.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

A report released this week argues the consequences of the drought have been more pronounced in some communities than others.

The analysis from the Pacific Institute and the Environmental Justice Coalition for Water says water shortages, hikes in water rates and fishery declines have been concentrated in low-income and disadvantaged communities. Additionally, Laura Feinstein with the Pacific Institute says those effects extend beyond the central valley, even to typically wet areas on the North Coast and Central Coast.

Governor Brown’s latest budget proposal has some new language related to clean drinking water.

 

The proposal acknowledges that many of California’s disadvantaged communities rely on contaminated groundwater and lack the resources to operate and maintain safe drinking water systems, but it stops short of any additional funding to fix the problem.

Jonathan Nelson with the advocacy group Community Water Center says this acknowledgement may seem modest now, but it could lead to bigger things.

California High-Speed Rail Authority

It’s a new year, and that means a new chapter in the ongoing saga that is California’s high-speed rail project. While construction in the Fresno area is becoming more and more visible with every month, efforts to stop the project are also picking up steam in the courtroom. The center of the fight against the rail line is in Kings County, where a number of landowners and county supervisors have challenged the rail project in court, saying it violates the voter-approved Proposition 1A.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

As the generation that pioneered organic farming begins to retire, they’re searching for different ways to continue their agricultural legacy. Some growers are passing on their farms to their kids, but as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports not all organic growers are as lucky to have a second generation that wants to take over the family farm.

National Weather Service, Hanford.

California has been hit hard by storms over the last week. There's been flooding, rain at high elevations and national park closures. To tell us more about what to expect in the coming days we were joined by National Weather Service Meteorologist Scott Rowe on our program Valley Edition. To listen to the interview click play above. 

Fresno State MFA Department

The Fresno State Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing has set a new record. Eight alumni authors from the program published their first books in 2016. Four more are set to publish books this year. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess brings us a story about flooding that took place in the Bass Lake area from the most recent storm to come through the region. To tell us more about what to expect from future weather patterns we're joined by National Weather Service Meteorologist Scott Rowe based in Hanford. Later in the program we hear about how organic farming is changing in California. We also chat about high speed rail with Hanford Sentinel Reporter Seth Nidever.

Kerry Klein / KVPR

Lost Lake Park just below Friant Dam in Fresno County was closed to the public on Monday due to flooding. But federal scientists say the flooding was controlled and not historical—and it provided an opportunity for scientific study.

Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey on Monday visited Lost Lake Park, where water has risen seven feet since last week. They’re here to measure the water’s flow rate, which will help calibrate the automatic sensors and gauges that monitor the river here 24 hours a day. 

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