News

Fresno Police say they have arrested the leadership of one of the city's most violent street gangs.

A 15-month investigation culminated Thursday morning with a highly coordinated set of raids.

At 7 O'clock, six simultaneous swat raids resulted in the arrest of 28 people including what the police department believes is the leadership of the Dog Pound Gang. 

The gang was allegedly making more than a million dollars a year, primarily in prostitution and racketeering, but is also connected to numerous shootings and murders.

Fresno leaders have officially announced the location and boundaries of a new central policing substation for the central part of town.

Stretching from Golden State Boulevard to First Street and Ashlan to Belmont, the new  Central Policing District will be headquartered at the Manchester Mall and will house 90-to-100 officers.

The district is being re-opened after recession-era budget cuts forced its closure.

Residents have been clamoring for a new substation, saying they have experienced an increase in crime.

http://ucanr.edu/sites/mgfresno/

Gardening is a popular hobby. Many people are in their yards right now working on their flowers and plants. The premiere Master Gardeners of Fresno County are holding a spring tour to show off their green thumbs Saturday April 23.

"This tour is all about learning and that is what we do,"  says Chris Hays who has been with the Master Gardener program for 17 years. "We have six gardens on the tour this year, but we also invite everyone to come to the public garden, The Garden of the Sun.

Holly Carter, Facebook

Holly Carter wants to replace Lee Brand on the Fresno City Council.  

"I never wanted to run for office, I actually still don't want to run for office," Carters says. "It's more of a gravitational pull."

Over the next few weeks KVPR will be talking with all three of the candidates who want to fill the District 6 seat on the council representing North Fresno. In this interview Valley Edition Host Joe Moore chats with Carter, a local businesswoman and cancer survivor, who runs her own marketing firm. 

https://vimeo.com/122365483

David Mas Masumoto starts with a question when talking about the new documentary about his family's farm. He asks, "How many harvests do you have left?"

The Masumoto family is known throughout the country as one of the nations foremost producers of organic peaches. But also known for their literary pursuits and intellectual pursuits which combine in this new documentary "Changing Season: On the Masumoto Family Farm."

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we are joined by the Masumoto family from Del Rey. David, Marcy, Nikiko and Korio Masumoto chat about a documentary, "Changing Season," created about their lives on their peach and grape farm. Later Valley Edition Host Joe Moore interviews Fresno City Council candidate Holly Carter.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A Fresno County Superior Court judge is allowing a lawsuit against the county public defender's office to move forward. 

The ACLU claims the office is underfunded and that violates the rights of defendants to due process and a speedy trial.

The ACLU’s Novella Coleman says budget cuts mean attorneys in the office are struggling with massive workloads. 

Courtesy of Howard Watkins

The Fresno Chapter of the League of Women Voters will celebrate its 75th anniversary next Monday with a special event featuring Fresno’s first woman mayor, Karen Humphrey. From 1989-1993 Humphrey led the city during both a time of rapid growth and a big change in governance.

Ezra David Romero

A new listing of America’s “Most Endangered Rivers” released Tuesday ranks a Central Valley waterway near the top of the list. 

The environmental group American Rivers says the San Joaquin River Basin is the nation’s second most endangered river.  It trails only the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin in Georgia, Alabama and Florida. The group’s John Cain says four years of drought has taken its toll on the San Joaquin.

Many valley residents struggle to access drinking water—some don’t have enough, while others face contamination. Now, a new law allows the state to step in and help those in need. In its first success story, the law didn't just bring water to a community; it helped end a standoff with a neighboring city.

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