News

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio / White Ash Broadcasting

The World Ag Expo began its three day run in Tulare Today/Tuesday. FM89's Ezra David Romero reports this year’s show is as much about software as it is farm equipment.

There are plenty of new tractors this year at the World Ag Expo. But it's not companies like John Deere and Caterpillar stealing the limelight. It’s rather groups that make products that fit in the palm of a hand. Marisa Carpenter is a spokesman for the expo.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

California farmers sold crops worth a record $54 billion, according to new numbers released from the California Department of Food and Agriculture. The annual crop report is for the 2014 year. The numbers show a 5 percent increase in crop value versus the previous year, despite the drought. 

The Pacific Institute

California’s four year drought has cost residents more than $2-billion dollars in increased electricity costs. That's the findings of an updated report from the Pacific Institute.

As reservoirs dried up over the drought, the amount of electricity produced by hydroelectric power plants has declined.

That means that in order to power the state, California had to produce electricity by more costly means like natural gas.

Half Dome, Yosemite National Park
Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Last month National Park Service officials made headlines when they announced their plan to remove the historic names from many of Yosemite National Park's treasured amenities, like the Ahwahnee Hotel and Curry Village, it sparked a public outcry.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition FM89's Ezra David Romero takes a look into the world of cotton counterfeiting. We also hear from Author Robert Binneweis about his time working as the Superintendent of Yosemite National Park and his views on the renaming of some of it's iconic sites. We also hear from KVPR's Jeffrey Hess about Fresno's Real Time Crime Center. We also hear from Russell Judd, CEO of the Kern Medical Center, about the health center's name change.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Americans come into contact with cotton every day. It’s a staple we use for clothing, food products and even cosmetics. But not all cotton is of equal quality. In fact many times higher grade cotton products have been laced with inferior fiber. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports on how the cotton industry is fighting back.

American Pima cotton is claimed as some of the finest cotton in the world. Debbie Fletcher only buys cotton products made out of the plant.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

The Fresno County Sheriff's Office is making progress filling a backlog of vacant correctional officer positions at the county jail.

The office is expected to give a mid-year update to the Board of Supervisors Tuesday including their need to fill 39 open jobs. That's down from 66 openings just three months ago.

But Sheriff's spokesman Tony Botti says that number is only going to grow over time.

How much privacy would you be willing to hand over to a police department in exchange for a promise of increased safety? Some say the Fresno Police Department is testing the very limits of that question with their Real Time Crime Center. Technology can help, but does it also have its limits?

There is a scene in the popular Batman movie The Dark Knight where Batman turns every cell phone in Gotham into one super surveillance network to help him hunt the Joker. His right-hand man Lucius explains the system this way:

Study Links Oil And Gas Activity in San Joaquin Valley To Earthquakes

Feb 4, 2016
Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Scientists have linked wastewater disposal from oil and gas activity to earthquakes in California for the first time. As Amy Quinton reports from Sacramento, the new study looked at earthquake activity in the southern Central Valley.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

The water is safe to drink.

That’s the message from the City of Fresno after residents in the northeast part of town reported discolored water. The issue came to the city’s attention with social media.

Public Works Director Tommy Esqueda said Thursday the city extensively tested the water in the lines and at five of the homes and found that the problem is not in the public water delivery system.

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