Valley Public Radio - Live Audio

News

Two new reporting projects launched this year by Valley Public Radio's news team are helping to highlight pressing issues facing residents across the San Joaquin Valley, including water pollution and the regional shortage of doctors. 

"We think it's important to take the time to do real in-depth reporting on some of these issues. And while a lot of our coverage is focused on illustrating problems where they exist, we're also looking to focus on possible solutions too," says Valley Public Radio's Director of Program Content Joe Moore. 

The Tejon Tribe is the only federally recognized Native American tribe in Kern County. Home to some 900 members, the tribe only regained its federal status in 2012 and is looking to raise its profile in the community, as well as preserve its language. This weekend, the tribe is welcoming the community at-large to learn more about the the tribe at a pow wow to be held at CSUB September 23rd and 24th. Gloria Morgan joined us on Valley Edition to talk about the tribe and the event this weekend. 

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

For about the past year, two San Joaquin valley school districts have allowed some parents and staff members to carry a concealed firearm on campus if they have a concealed carry weapons permit and seek the permission of the district superintendent.

However, under a new bill on Governor Jerry Brown’s desk, that authority could soon be revoked.

The California Legislature has approved Assembly Bill 424, which would strip that authority from superintendents in all but a few narrow circumstances.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

When people think of homelessness, they often think of big cities like Fresno or Bakersfield. But in the mountains of Madera County it's a lingering problem. And as the short-term rental market grows, some fear the housing shortage in the communities just outside Yosemite will only get worse. 

Serenity Village is a seven-unit affordable apartment complex in Oakhurst targeted at helping homeless people get back on their feet.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports on homelessness in the Oakhurst area and about concealed weapons in Kingsburg. We are also joined by NPR's Felix Contreras in an interview with Dolores Huerta. Later we hear all about the City of Clovis' plan to build tiny alley cottages. We also learn all about the Tejon Indian Powow in the south valley and hear about a new book focused on the history Highway 99. 

The highway plays an important part in the mystique of the American West. From the so-called "Mother Road" of Route 66 that wound from Chicago to LA, to the picturesque beauty of the California coast along Highway 1, our highways are more than just transportation infrastructure, they are a part of our culture. That’s certainly the case here in the middle of the state, where a ribbon of concrete and asphalt has stitched together towns big and small for decades – Highway 99.

Todd Rosenberg / Courtesy The Fresno Philharmonic

Valley Public Radio is pleased to announce that the station will broadcast recorded performances of the Fresno Philharmonic's 2017-2018 Masterworks Concert Series. This season is the first under new Music Director Rei Hotoda, and includes performances from soloists including Awadagin Pratt, Orion Weiss and Stephanie Sant'Ambrogio. The concerts will air on FM89 on the second Tuesday at 8:00 PM following the concert performance. This broadcast schedule is subject to change.

New Hosts Join Philosophy Talk Team

Sep 13, 2017

Philosophy Talk has added two new voices to its broadcast team, with co-hosts Debra Satz and Joshua Landy. Both Stanford professors, Satz and Landy will join host Ken Taylor on alternating weeks. John Taylor will become host emeritus. 

The program producers write:

Ryan Jacobsen / Fresno County Farm Bureau

Monday’s heavy rain and gusty winds in the valley hurt two of the region’s largest money-making crops.

 

Fresno County is the top grower of raisins in the country, but Monday’s storm came at the worst moment for farmers growing the crop. At this time of year grapes are laid on paper trays to sun dry. Fresno County Farm Bureau CEO Ryan Jacobsen says the full damage to the crop won’t be known for months.

 

Visitors to Yosemite leave behind 2,200 tons of garbage per year. That is equal to 3,919 dumpsters full of trash.
Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park has a trash problem. The more than 4 million people who visit every year and those that live in Yosemite leave 2,200 tons of garbage there annually. The park service is working to decrease the amount of that trash that ends up in the Mariposa County Landfill.

To find out more about the park’s Zero Landfill Initiative, FM89’s Ezra David Romero  interviewed Yosemite National Park Ranger Jodi Bailey and Wildlife Biologist Caitlin Lee-Roney. Listen to that interview by clicking play above. 

Kerry Klein / KVPR

As the San Joaquin Valley struggles with a shortage of primary care physicians, one group in particular is stepping in to fill in the gaps: doctors born or trained in foreign countries. And while the planned repeal of the DACA program is President Trump’s most recent immigration policy change, he’s hinted at others that could influence the flow of foreign physicians into the Valley. This installment of our series Struggling For Care explores the valley’s complicated relationship with international doctors.

FPU

Fresno Pacific University has a new leader, Dr. Joseph Jones. The private, non-profit Christian university has been a fixture in southeast Fresno for over 60 years, also operates campuses in Merced, Visalia and Bakersfield. An ordained minister with a Ph.D in criminology, Jones brings a uniquely community-focused vision to the Mennonite Brethren affiliated campus. He joined us on Valley Edition to talk about his vision for the university, and issues ranging from campus diversity to peacemaking and racial reconciliation in the community and nationally. 

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

A major scandal rocked the auto industry two years ago when it was discovered that the car company Volkswagen had been systematically cheating on diesel emissions tests. That scandal might soon turn into a big boon for electric cars in the Central Valley.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

Police officers across the country and in the Central Valley have been under increasing scrutiny and pressure for how they deal with civilians in the field. At the same time, some departments are acknowledging that their role is morphing into one that is just as concerned with identifying and helping people who might be suffering from a mental illness as it is enforcing the law. Fresno’s Police Chief Jerry Dyer says he is making changes within his force in an attempt to separate committed criminals from people who need a softer form of help.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports stories on the doctor shortage and what a recall from Volkswagen means for the region. We also hear from Fresno Pacific University's new leader, President Joseph Jones. Later KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess interviews Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer about homelessness and other issues in the city. Ending the program FM89 Reporter Ezra David Romero interviews  Yosemite National Park Ranger Jodi Bailey and Wildlife Biologist Caitlin Lee-Roney about the park's trash problem.

Pages