News

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Thousands of consumers and interested buyers from around the globe gathered at the Fresno Convention Center this week for the Sixth Annual Fresno Food Expo.

The two day event is all about getting Central California products – think tasty cheeses, spreads and charcuterie — into the hands of distributers so people far and wide can taste what comes out of this place we call home.

“It’s so much more than a tradeshow, this is a movement,” says Amy Fuentes, manager of the expo. “This is about bragging about who we are.”

CSPAN

Bakersfield’s Dolores Huerta delivered a speech this afternoon before delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Huerta urged Latinos to vote for Hillary Clinton and other Democrats.

Huerta: “And with Donald Trump on the ballot, we cannot be quiet. He insults Latinos like we were second-class citizens, like we were newcomers to this county. Hey, I have news for Donald Trump because we have been here all along.”

Bureau of Land Management

Wildfires across the country have burned more than two millions acres of forest this year. And as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports fire officials hope a new real-time warning system will keep civilian operated drones out of the fire fight.

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Kerry Klein/KVPR

In the Sierra Nevada, it’s estimated that tens of millions of trees have died as a result of drought, many of which succumbed to infestations from bark beetles. As a result, we’ve been told our risk of wildfire is far higher than normal, but FM89’s Kerry Klein says the science doesn’t necessarily agree.

Taser

The phrase ‘seeing is believing’ takes on a whole new meaning in a world full of cellphone videos and police body cameras. Every officer in the Fresno Police Department now wears a camera that records the majority of their work. However, what footage is or isn’t released to the public is a murky subject.

Police body camera video captured the fatal shooting of 19-year old Dylan Noble in graphic detail. It was eventually released to the public to answer questions about why the unarmed man was shot.

Valley Public Radio

  This week on Valley Edition we take another look at the correlation between body cameras and police involved shootings. We also hear from KVPR's Kerry Klein on bark beetle damage in the Sierra Nevada. Later in the program host Joe Moore leads a conversation about technology in Fresno and Kern Counties. We also hear from FM89's Ezra David Romero on how lawmakers think striped bass are eating up salmon in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Ending the  program we hear from Sarah Troop on  her latest book "Lindsay" looking at the history of the town. 

Sarah Troop

The Tulare County community of Lindsay is known for many things. From olives to citrus, to notable residents and war heroes. But perhaps surprisingly little has been written when it comes to the city’s history.

That glaring problem has been at least partially addressed by a new book “Lindsay” by author Sarah Troop, who also is the curator of the Lindsay Museum and Gallery. Troop is giving at talk at the Lindsay branch of the Tulare County Public Library on Thursday night from 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM.

Bitwise Industries

 The Valley is known for growing things. But lately some of the region’s most notable crops haven’t been grown on a farm, they’ve been grown in front of a laptop, or an iPad – new and growing software companies. Now local technology leaders in both Kern and Fresno Counties are talking about how to strategically grow the local software industry to the next level. So how can tech jobs power the future economy of the valley? We spoke to three local tech experts about where the local industry is going:

Guests:

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

A new report from the Fresno Police Department appears to show a pattern of African-American residents being over-represented in interactions with police. African-Americans were disproportionately more likely to be interviewed than Hispanic or white residents in all areas of the city.

While they only make up about 6% of the city’s population, black residents made up between 20-to-25% of all field interviews according to police logs from the Office of Independent Review.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Publir Radio

The USDA and the National Center for Lesbian Rights are working to meet the needs of rural LGBT residents in the valley. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports over 200 people attended the California LGBT Rural Pride Summit Thursday in Visalia.

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