Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

This year Yosemite National Park is on pace to have four and a half million visitors. That would be an all-time record. All those people mean a lot of traffic in a place known for its serenity.  And as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports the Park Service is in the process of making changes so visitors won’t have to often wait in what feels like rush hour traffic in the middle of the forest.

Hope Hall - Presidential Videographer / White House YouTube

The year 2016 was supposed to be one of celebration at Yosemite National Park, one of the crown jewels of the now century-old National Park Service. But while President Obama did visit the park to celebrate the NPR Centennial this past summer, a new scandal has rocked the park and those who work there. Allegations of a hostile work environment, gender discrimination and sexual harassment led longtime park superintendent Don Neubacher to unexpectedly resign last week.

Valley Public Radio

  This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess recounts the First Family's trip to Yosemite National Park. We also hear reporting from KVPR'S Ezra David Romero on how a sheep farmer is growing feed indoors to save water. Later in the program Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports on groundwater issues in Paso Robles. FM89's Jeffrey Hess also reports on Laura's Law, the California state law that allows for court-ordered assisted outpatient treatment. Ending the program we hear from Agustín Lira And Patricia Wells about their new album 'Songs Of Hope And Struggle."

President Barack Obama and the first family visited Yosemite national park over the weekend to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.

The Obamas took in the sights of the popular park as part of a two-day stay, including hiking to Glacier Point.

Obama himself gave a short speech in front of the Yosemite Falls saying preserving the national parks for future generations is a huge task.


Half Dome, Yosemite National Park
Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Last month National Park Service officials made headlines when they announced their plan to remove the historic names from many of Yosemite National Park's treasured amenities, like the Ahwahnee Hotel and Curry Village, it sparked a public outcry.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Some popular Yosemite landmarks including the Ahwahnee Hotel and Curry Village will soon be getting new names thank to a lawsuit over intellectual property associate with the park.

Longtime concessionaire Deleware North contends that it owns the trademark to the names, and wants $50 million from the new concessionaire Aramark, which takes over March 1st. The National Park Service disputes the trademark claims. Scott Gediman is the Yosemite spokesperson.

Rockfall Closes Highway 140 In Yosemite

Jan 7, 2016
National Park Service

A rockfall early this morning below the Arch Rock entrance to Yosemite National Park has closed Highway 140. Massive boulders are currently blocking the roadway, which is near the site of the 2014 Dog Rock Fire. The road is currently closed from the park entrance to the junction of Highways 120 and 140. 

It's unknown when the roadway will re-open. Services in El Portal are still open. The rockfall happened at about 5:45 A.M. Thursday morning, following several wet El Nino storms. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we talk about El Niño related storms that have begun to hit the region. Daniel Swain joins the conversation. He runs the website Weather West, which has provided a unique California weather and climate discussion since 2006. He is a PhD candidate in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University.

Scott Lange and Nick Foster / http://www.darkskyphotography.com/

Imagine for a moment hiking the majestic John Muir trail in the High Sierra from Yosemite to Mount Whitney. Now imagine doing it in the middle of the night, with a load of sophisticated cameras, tripods and telescopes. That’s just what Scott Lange and Nick Foster did last summer, all in an effort to produce breathtaking long-exposure nighttime images of heavens and the landscape. 


Alex Honnold is a real life Spiderman. He’s climbed heights like El Capitan and Half Dome in Yosemite National Park. But what sets him apart from other climbers is that he leaves ropes and carabiners behind. In this interview FM89’s Ezra David Romero speaks with Honnold about his new book Alone on the Wall detailing 20 years of climbing history.