valley fever

Valley Edition
12:02 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

On Valley Edition: Restorative Justice; Valley Fever; Taxes; Nurses; Bakersfield Jazz Festival

Credit http://smoothjazzbuzz.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/27th-bakersfield-jazz-festival/

This week on Valley Edition we explore the region through reports and interviews on valley fever, restorative justice in schools, health care, taxes and a Jazz festival in the area.

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Health
9:39 am
Tue May 7, 2013

State Raises Questions About Moving Inmates At Risk of Valley Fever

Under the plan proposed by the federal receiver in charge of health care in California's prisons, an estimated 50 percent of inmates at Avenal and Pleasant Valley state prisons would be moved because they are at high risk of contracting valley fever.
Credit CA Dept of Corrections

In a motion filed in U.S. District Court yesterday, the state Attorney General raised questions about the federal order to exclude inmates especially vulnerable to valley fever from two Central Valley prisons.

“The receiver is calling for the transferring, he described it last week as ‘effective immediately,’ of over 3,000 inmates from those two prisons,” says Jeffrey Callison, spokesman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. “That’s a huge, complex undertaking. Could it happen? Of course it could happen, but it would take a long time to implement.”

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Health
6:44 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Prison Health Advocates Call For More Steps to Stop Valley Fever Outbreak

On Monday afternoon, the federal receiver in charge of health care in California’s prisons ordered the state prison to remove inmates from two Central Valley prisons who are especially at risk of contracting valley fever.  A day later, the state and experts are digesting that directive. Valley Public Radio's Rebecca Plevin reports, as part of the Reporting on Health Collaborative’s investigation into the disease.

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Health
9:59 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Inmates At Risk of Valley Fever To Be Moved From Two Valley Prisons

About 40 percent of the inmates at Avenal and Pleasant Valley state prisons will be relocated, due to their risk of acquiring valley fever.
Credit Casey Christie / The Californian

The federal receiver in charge of health care in California’s prisons is ordering the state to remove inmates from two Central Valley prisons who are especially at risk of contracting the fungal disease known as valley fever. The move affects about 40 percent of the inmate population at Avenal and Pleasant Valley State Prisons. 

Those affected include African Americans, Filipinos, inmates who are HIV positive, have compromised immune systems, or are pregnant or elderly.

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Valley Edition
12:35 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

On Valley Edition: Medical Interpreters; Clinics; Makers Faire; High-Speed Rail

Credit Credit California High Speed Rail Authority / File Photo

This week on Valley Edition we take a look across the region at health issues, innovation, the future of high-speed rail in California and more.

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Health
9:30 am
Tue April 23, 2013

CDC To Hold Valley Fever Symposium in Bakersfield, McCarthy Says

Congressman Kevin McCarthy has enlisted the help of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to raise awareness of valley fever, and to encourage the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to waive a fee needed to put a valley fever skin test on the market.
Credit Shelby Mack / The Bakersfield Californian

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will visit the San Joaquin Valley later this year to train public health professionals and the public in recognizing and defending against valley fever, Congressman Kevin McCarthy said Monday after an in-depth meeting with the agency and its director.

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Just One Breath
12:48 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

CDC Study: Valley Fever Cases Increasing Dramatically

Dust storms can carry millions of spores from the fungus that causes valley fever.
Credit Craig Kohlruss / The Fresno Bee

Cases of valley fever are climbing at stunning rates nationwide, and especially in California and Arizona, according to a new study released today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency launched its analysis following the publication of the Reporting on Health Collaborative’s ‘Just One Breath’ series on valley fever. Valley Public Radio is a member of the partnership.

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Valley Edition
11:40 am
Tue March 19, 2013

On Valley Edition: Fresno, Bakersfield Animal Control; Valley Fever & Advocacy; 40 Under 40

State Senator Cathleen Galgiani, D-Stockton, has requested to become the chairperson of the Senate Select Committee on Valley Fever.
Credit Marty Bicek / ZUMAPRESS.com

On this week’s Valley Edition we discuss the future of animal control across California's Central Valley. Host Juanita Stevenson takes the listener into Fresno County where the city and county no longer work together when it comes to Animal Control since the SPCA six months back announced it would no longer provide services to either agency.   

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Just One Breath
10:29 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Valley Fever Advocates See Hope For New Funding, New Laws

Assemblymember Rudy Salas, D-Bakersfield, is interested in supporting valley fever research at UC Merced.
Sean Work The Californian

For Central California families impacted by valley fever, it seemed like the long-ignored disease was finally gaining attention.

"Good afternoon everyone," said former State Senator Michael Rubio, as he welcomed people to a town hall meeting on valley fever, held last fall in Bakersfield. "I want to thank you for participating and joining us."

"My goal is to listen today and then capture a handful of action items, so that we can go back to Sacramento and introduce some legislation to move the ball forward on this very important subject."

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Just One Breath
11:45 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Valley Fever Stories: Bernadette Madrid

Bernadette Madrid
Credit Photo courtesy of Bernadette Madrid

Bernadette Madrid, Bakersfield, 29

I’ve been diabetic since I was 10. I got really sick with valley fever in 2006. It’s been a long seven years.

I thought I had a flu that wouldn’t go away and I had severe pain in my ribs. I also noticed that my vision was becoming blurry, and I thought maybe I needed glasses.

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Just One Breath
11:34 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Valley Fever Stories: Jerry Walker

Jerry Walker of Bakersfield
Credit Casey Christie / The Californian

Jerry Walker, Bakersfield, 59

My name is Jerry Walker and I am a valley fever survivor.

I was not born and raised here. In late 1991, I was working as a petroleum engineer for one of the largest oilfield service companies in the world. Around the second week of November, I was working on the west side of the valley and experienced a very windy day with blowing sand.

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Just One Breath
11:20 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Valley Fever Stories: David Losa

David Losa of Bakersfield
Credit Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

David Losa, Bakersfield, 68

After living in Bakersfield for 17 years and not catching valley fever, I thought I might be immune. Being aware that the disease was endemic in my hometown, I read everything about it that I could get my hands on.

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Just One Breath
11:18 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Valley Fever Stories: Karen Werts

Karen Werts of Bakersfield
Credit Casey Christie / The Californian

Karen Werts, 53, Bakersfield

My journey with valley fever began in August 2010. While at work at a local medical center, I felt heaviness in my chest and my right arm ached. My boss sent me to urgent care to make sure I was not having a heart attack. The EKG was normal, but a chest X-ray showed a slight shadow in my right lung. The physician said I probably had the start of bronchitis, and prescribed antibiotics. The heavy feeling in my chest never went away and my legs began to swell.

One month later, I awoke in the middle of the night with chills. Later that night, I woke up again, soaking wet. I figured I was coming down with the flu, so I stayed home from work that day.

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Just One Breath
6:21 am
Sat December 22, 2012

Suffering, Misdiagnosis and Pain: Community Members Share Their Valley Fever Stories

Kathleen W. Zuckerman of Bakersfield is one of many valley fever patients who were misdiagnosed with another disease.

The Reporting on Health Collaborative asked readers to share their experiences with valley fever. Here are their stories, in their own words, as told to the Collaborative's Community Engagement Editor, Kellie Schmitt. 

Their accounts capture the pain and anguish suffered by local families as doctors struggled to find the right treatment and jobs and lives were lost to the disease. Misdiagnosis was a frequent problem, allowing time for the disease to "tunnel" its way into lungs and other organs, as one survivor put it. 

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Just One Breath
6:11 am
Sat December 22, 2012

Five Ways to Move the Fight Against Valley Fever Forward

Bakersfield resident Diana Frizzelle was diagnosed with valley fever last year and is still on medication to treat the disease.
Alex Horvath/The Bakersfield Californian

Valley fever is a humbling disease.

It can rob sufferers of their health, their life plans and their financial well-being.

Uncertainty adds to the trauma. There is no cure around the corner, no vaccine in the works and no well-organized patient group lobbying effectively for more policy attention.

The result: those who become ill often suffer in silence and feel alone.

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Just One Breath
6:00 am
Sat December 8, 2012

Valley fever treatments can do harm as they heal

Dr. Arash Heidari prepares medicine that will be injected into an omaya injection reservoir on valley fever patient Mel Ramirez's head. Amphotericin, the antifungal medication, has stopped the progression of valley fever in Ramirez's brain and spinal cord

Thousands of California and Arizona adults and children annually contract valley fever and find themselves battling the disease for months or years — missing work and school, spending weeks in the hospital — with frequent recurrences.

If they had a bacterial infection — food poisoning, strep throat or a boil on the skin — their doctor could reach for multiple, cost-effective antibiotics that usually are able to kill the bacteria, even though resistance to antibiotics is on the rise.

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Just One Breath
10:55 am
Mon November 26, 2012

For Some California Prisoners, Valley Fever Becomes A Life Sentence

Kevin Walker acquired disseminated cocci while serving time at the federal prison in Taft.
Kevin Walker

Kevin Walker arrived at Taft Correctional Institution, a federal prison in western Kern County, in December 1999 to serve a 14-year sentence for attempted possession of cocaine.

But another kind of sentence awaited him, one far more painful than confinement alone.

In July 2001, fluid-leaking boils broke out across Walker’s face and body. Once he was diagnosed with valley fever, doctors put him on an antifungal drug — amphotericin B — but the drug was so powerful that it caused his kidneys and liver to begin failing.

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Just One Breath
6:33 am
Mon November 19, 2012

Valley fever takes an animal toll, and pets rely on the same treatments as people

Debra Stone holds her dog Nemo, who appears to be doing very well after recently being diagnosed with valley fever.
Henry A. Barrios The Bakersfield Californian

The first valley fever victim that Dr. Demosthenes Pappagianis remembers was Mbongo — a gorilla at the San Diego Zoo

“I was a kid in San Diego at the time and saw the article in the newspaper,” recalled the veteran researcher on the animal’s 1942 death from the disease, also known as coccidiomycosis. “I didn’t know what cocci were at that time, but I knew that a gorilla at the zoo had died.”

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Just One Breath
6:00 am
Mon November 19, 2012

Valley Fever Research For Pets May Yield Benefits For Humans

Bobbi Duke holds Crash, her three-legged cat that is recovering from valley fever. Another family pet, Lucas, a dog, has also been diagnosed with valley fever and she has concern that Sheeba, another family dog, may also have valley fever.
Henry A. Barrios The Bakersfield Californian

Dogs, not people, may hold the key to improved treatments, even a possible cure, for valley fever.

One way researchers have lured private money is by proposing research projects involving pets, the theory being that companies and donors would see more of a market potential in dogs and cats suffering and dying from the disease.

Dogs and humans get hit with valley fever in a very similar way. They inhale spores from a fungus common in the soil in the Southwest. The spores take root in the lungs and can spread to other organs and parts of the body.

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Just One Breath
5:38 pm
Wed October 17, 2012

More People Dying from Valley Fever, Especially Those With Chronic Disease

Dr. Navin Amin examines Archie Scott, a patient with valley fever, at his office in Bakersfield. Dr. Amin is the chair of the family practice department at Kern Medical Center and a valley fever expert.
Henry A. Barrios / The Bakersfield Californian

More people are dying from valley fever than previously thought, and illnesses including diabetes, lung disease, arthritis and certain cancers may increase a person’s chances of dying from the disease, according to a new study.

This past year, researchers have puzzled over the rise of valley fever cases. Diagnosed cases have grown from 1,200 in 1995 to more than 20,000 in 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Now researchers have new evidence to consider: a study to be published in the November issue of the CDC’s Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.

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