Sierra Nevada

Flickr user WBUR, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Right now in California’s Sierra Nevada, an estimated 66 million trees have died, due to a deadly combination of drought and bark beetles, which take advantage of dry, thirsty trees. But could we prevent beetles from ever attacking trees in the first place? Researchers have been asking this question for decades, and a new tool fends off bark beetles using the very thing that makes them so deadly.

http://www.dirtlabbushcraft.com/

Due to drought bark beetles have ravaged lots of pine trees in the Sierra Nevada forcing homeowners to fall dead trees around their houses. Now one organization is offering a class to teach people what they can do with all these dead trees.

-        

Instead of hauling dead pine trees killed by bark beetles to sawmills across Central California, Jonathon Tepperman with the group Dirtlab Bushcraft wants to offer another option to homeowners.

 

Courtesy of Dr. Sallie Phillips

The Goose Fire burning in the foothills of Fresno County near Prather has burned more than 1,800 acres. It’s threatening 400 structures and has forced hundreds of people to evacuate. The blaze is 15 percent contained. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports that people aren’t the only evacuees. 

The Fresno County Sheriff’s Office is reporting that 600 animals have been evacuated off mountain ranches and homes because of the Goose Fire.   

foothills
Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

California needs as much rain and snow as it can get. So far this year El Nino caused storms have watered the hills of the Sierra Nevada so much this winter that as a result they’re bursting with color earlier in the year than usual.

“If you actually go up and look at those grasses you’ll see that they’re already starting to flower,” says Sequoia National Forest Supervisor Kevin Elliott. “So it means that they’re coming at the end of their lifecycle.”

Elliott says even before spring rain ends grass and flowers could turn brown.   

Courtesty of Bob Wick

A hard to reach grove of giant sequoias in Tulare County is going to get a lot easier to get to later this year. The trees sit on top of a mountain seven miles southeast of Three Rivers that's part of Craig Ranch. The ranch was given to the Bureau of Land Management through a deal between the Visalia Sequoia Riverlands Trust and the San Francisco based Save the Redwoods League. Jessica Neff is with the league.

Ezra David Romero
Valley Public Radio

Last summer the Rough Fire grew so large that fire crews from around the world came to the Sierra Nevada east of Fresno to fight the blaze. Today the area is still feeling the effects of the 150,000 acre burn. And as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports El Nino is bringing a whole new set of problems to the area

Pine Flat Lake is rising about a half a foot a day.  Recent rain and snow are slowly filling it up.  

California State Parks Facebook

Winter might be a cold and wet time of the year here in Central California, but it's also a good time to get outside and enjoy nature. And with the High Sierra covered in snow hikes turn to the foothills. On this week's Valley Edition we chat about activities to do in the hills near Fresno and Madera.

Biomass Power Could Help California's Dying Forests

Jan 5, 2016
Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

Millions of dead trees in California create a huge risk of wildfire. It’s led Governor Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency that will require utilities, power plants and state agencies to work together. Biomass power plants can create energy from those dead trees. But as Amy Quinton reports from Sacramento, biomass plants alone won’t solve the crisis.

Scott Lange and Nick Foster / http://www.darkskyphotography.com/

Imagine for a moment hiking the majestic John Muir trail in the High Sierra from Yosemite to Mount Whitney. Now imagine doing it in the middle of the night, with a load of sophisticated cameras, tripods and telescopes. That’s just what Scott Lange and Nick Foster did last summer, all in an effort to produce breathtaking long-exposure nighttime images of heavens and the landscape. 

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/legalcode

At one time there were over 10,000 grizzly bears in California, but people’s fear of the enormous animal drove the bears to extinction. The last California grizzly bear was shot in Tulare County in 1924. One group would like to see the bears thrive again. But as Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero reports not everyone thinks the idea is a good one..

Pages