research

Just One Breath
3:17 pm
Sun October 7, 2012

Valley fever vaccine effort lacks federal funding

The federal government is the single biggest source for the primary research that leads to new vaccines. 

But, like the pharmaceutical industry, it currently is not supporting a valley fever vaccine. Other diseases that affect far fewer people receive much more federal support. 

Tularemia only affects about 200 people in the country annually, less than 1 percent of the estimated 150,000 people hit by valley fever. Like valley fever, the disease is primarily concentrated in only a portion of the country, mostly in the south-central and western part of the country.

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Just One Breath
2:58 pm
Sun October 7, 2012

Valley fever vaccine stalls after early promise

Dr. Demosthenes Pappagianis, the lab where he and members of his research staff are developing a Valley Fever vaccine, inside Tupper Hall at University of California, Davis.
Photo by Brian Baer/Special To The Sacramento Bee

Just eight years ago, a vaccine to stop valley fever seemed within reach.

Ambitious scientists at five universities had brought in millions of dollars since 1997 from private donations and government funding to develop a way to beat the fungus before it ever had a chance to lodge in a person’s lungs and wreak havoc on his or her organs.

In 2004, they announced they had selected a pathway to pursue a vaccine.

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Just One Breath
2:00 pm
Sun October 7, 2012

Scientists took different routes to find valley fever vaccine

Dr. Demosthenes Pappagianis, the lab where he and members of his research staff are developing a Valley Fever vaccine, inside Tupper Hall at University of California, Davis.
Photo by Brian Baer/Special To The Sacramento Bee

Five scientists were chosen by a committee affiliated with California State University, Bakersfield, in 1997 to pursue vaccine research.

Dr. John Galgiani, 66, professor at the University of Arizona and director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence

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