Valley Public Radio - Live Audio

High Speed Rail

California High-Speed Rail Authority

The California High Speed Rail Authority has officially released an updated plan that makes big changes to first section of the bullet train.

The plan confirms that the Authority wants to change the first functional section of track to run from Bakersfield to San Jose. The original plan was for the first working segment of track to run from the Central Valley to Burbank outside LA.

The report leaked on Wednesday, but Thursday evening the Rail Authority released an official version of the document confirming the route change.

Change Of Destination Expected For High Speed Rail

Feb 18, 2016
California High Speed Rail Authority

A big change appears to be in the works for California’s high speed rail project. Valley Public Radio’s Jeffrey Hess has more.

The original plan was to connect cities in the Central Valley to Burbank in Southern California with the first functional stretch of track. Now according to multiple media reports, the High-Speed Rail Authority appears ready to run the first trains from Bakersfield to San Jose.

The rail authority is expected to release a report tomorrow detailing the need for the change.

Legal Challenge Could Freeze Billions In Funds For California's Bullet Train

Feb 11, 2016
California High-Speed Rail Authority

The future of California's high speed rail project may now rest with a Sacramento judge. Oral Arguments wrapped up Thursday in a case that says the project has strayed from what voters approved in 2008.

Stuart Flashman is the attorney representing Central Valley landowners who oppose the project. He wants the judge to stop high-speed rail in its tracks.

Work is officially underway tearing down bridges and moving roads to clear the way for High Speed Rail. Leaders with the city of Fresno and the High Speed Rail Authority met in downtown Wednesday to officially celebrate the beginning of construction.

Workers are beginning the careful process of removing the bridge while keeping the existing rail line running.

The bridge needs to be torn down to make way for a new taller span.

It is the first major urban construction project connected to the bullet train in the Fresno area.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess takes a look at how construction from California High Speed Rail will change Fresno. Later, VE Host Joe Moore interviews Rep. Jim Costa about the urgency to get Calif. water legislation passed. Ending the program, Moore talks about the top news stories of 2015 in Central California.

High-Speed Rail Authority

Ready or not here it comes. Wrecking balls will start swinging early next year on projects connected to High Speed rail, and it could impact how you get around.

Even if you never set foot on a high speed train its power could ripple into your life.

Visible construction is set to begin in downtown Fresno at the start of next year.

City of Fresno

Construction on California’s high-speed rail project is set to give local drivers some headaches. Starting next month work will begin on the demolition of the Tuolumne Street bridge in downtown Fresno.

The bridge, which links Highway 99 with the central business district will eventually be replaced by a new higher bridge that will span both the union pacific and high speed rail tracks, and will accommodate 2-way traffic.

POLITIFACT: Have Costs Dropped 'Several Hundred Million Dollars' For California’s Bullet Train?

Nov 24, 2015
California High-Speed Rail Authority

Questions about high costs have dogged California’s high-speed rail project for years.

Now, leaders of the controversial bullet train network say some expenses are, in fact, trending downward. That led Capital Public Radio’s PolitiFact reporter Chris Nichols to check out the facts.

In recent weeks, the California High-Speed Rail Authority has faced criticism that it concealed higher cost estimates. Those estimates, if correct, could add $8 billion to the project’s $68 billion price tag.

POLITIFACT: Is The Private Sector ‘Unwilling’ To Fund California’s Bullet Train?

Nov 23, 2015
Califonia High-Seed Rail Authority

California’s bullet train project has faced new criticism in recent weeks. Its leaders have been accused of hiding higher cost estimates and failing to win funding from the private sector.

One recent attack by a Central Valley state lawmaker caught the attention of Capital Public Radio’s PolitiFact reporter Chris Nichols.

Plans to build a high-speed rail network from LA to San Francisco rely heavily on private funding.

CAHSR

With the current controversy over how much it will cost to actually build high speed rail, there’s been relatively little discussion about what Californians are actually getting with the planned bullet train. And when it comes to how the train system will function in the lives of passengers, the role of high speed rail stations becomes even more important.

https://twitter.com/EvanOnstot

KSEE 24’s Evan Onstot joined us on Valley Edition to talk about local politics, the row over bonuses paid out to top City of Fresno employees and high speed rail.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Ezra David Romero explores why Tulare County is considering red tagging drought stricken rental homes. Later we speak with Eric Eidlin on how German high speed rail compares to plans for California High Speed Rail. Eidlin is a regional policy fellow of the German Marshall Fund and works for the Federal Transit Administration.

High Speed Rail Authority

Will California’s high-speed rail system be German enough?

That question is not a joke, as I learned last month while riding Germany’s popular high-speed rail. In fact, it’s a more important question than the ones Californians have been myopically asking for years about the costs, funding, and construction deadlines of the state’s controversial project.

State Insists High-Speed Rail Remains On Track

Nov 6, 2015
Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

After appearing to pick up steam this year, California's ambitious high-speed rail project hit a snag this week. Opponents are accusing the High-Speed Rail Authority of hiding higher cost estimates. The state insists that costs remain on track, although the trains may not be ready to run on time. Ben Bradford reports from Sacramento.

In January, after years of delays and legal battles, Governor Jerry Brown finally celebrated the groundbreaking for California’s High Speed Rail line.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

The CEO of California’s High Speed Rail Authority is defending the project after Assembly Republicans issued calls for an investigation into project management, following an explosive LA Times report.

The article alleges that the rail authority actively concealed information that ran counter to their projections about the project’s cost and engineering challenges.

Assembly member Jim Patterson says rail CEO Jeff Morales has not been up front about the project and should testify under oath before an Assembly committee.

Pages