Government & Politics

News about government and politics

Lee Brand / Valley Public Radio

For the first time in eight years, Central California’s largest city is about to get a new leader. Last week Fresno Mayor-elect Lee Brand announced his transition team, plus the hire of two top aides to senior positions in his administration. Brand's former campaign manager Tim Orman will become the mayor's chief of staff, and former campaign rival H. Spees will become Brand's director of strategic initiatives, both with six-figures salaries. 

As the polls close, a supporter holds a sign for Donald Trump in Reno, Nev., Nov. 8, 2016.

NY Times

California Voters Reject Prop 53, Pass Prop 66

Nov 22, 2016
Voters cast their November 2016 presidential election ballots at a polling place in Sacramento's Pocket neighborhood.
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

Voters cast their November 2016 presidential election ballots at a polling place in Sacramento's Pocket neighborhood.

Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

Two weeks after Election Day, the Associated Press has called the final two unresolved California ballot measures.

Bill and Shirley Thomas outside their home in Long Beach. Their Trump signs were stolen three times before the election, they say, but this latest sign has lasted about five weeks.
Mary Plummer/KPCC

Bill and Shirley Thomas outside their home in Long Beach. Their Trump signs were stolen three times before the election, they say, but this latest sign has lasted about five weeks. Mary Plummer/KPCC

For the past few months, Gala Caprice Cruz has been running the volunteer operation for Donald Trump in northern Los Angeles County.

Cruz sent emails, organized events, and used Facebook to get Trump's message out in a state that is one of the bluest in the nation.

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

On the campaign trail, Donald Trump promised hard-line immigration reform, including the deportation of millions of undocumented residents across America upon taking office.

Pollsters Mark Baldassare with the Public Policy Institute of California and Mark DiCamillo with Field Research Corporation address the Sacramento Press Club on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016.
Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

Pollsters Mark Baldassare with the Public Policy Institute of California and Mark DiCamillo with Field Research Corporation address the Sacramento Press Club on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016.

Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

It’s often said that “as California goes, so goes the nation.” But that’s rarely been less true than in last week’s election.

Two of California’s most highly respected pollsters say the results underscore just how different the Golden State is.

AP Photo / Rich Pedroncelli

California voters added to what are considered the nation’s strongest gun control laws on Election Day by approving Proposition 63.

The measure imposes background checks on ammunition sales; bans possession of large-capacity ammunition magazines; and forces owners to give up their weapons as soon as they can no longer legally possess them.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

We talk politics in a special post-election Valley Edition this week. Should the media and political establishment put so much emphasis on predictive polling? What does a Trump administration mean for the Central Valley, and for local GOP leaders like Kevin McCarthy and Devin Nunes? And what do local races and voter turnout tell us about future campaigns?

Oxford University Press

It was one of the biggest scandals the country had ever seen - the theft of U.S. government secrets about the atomic bomb that wound up in the hands of the Soviet Union. The federal government eventually tried and executed Julius and Ethel Rosenberg for conspiracy, sparking an international outcry. Now the story of the Rosenbergs is back in the news, as there is an effort underway to seek a presidential pardon in their case.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

The impact of a Donald Trump presidency on the Central Valley is still a great mystery. However, modern American presidents have broad powers that they can put into effect quickly. There are more than a few very specific actions Trump could take that would directly affect Central California.

Some of the bigger promises made by president-elect Trump will require the cooperation of the Republican-controlled Congress. Promises like a border wall, mass deportations, and repealing Obamacare will take some time.

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