Fresno

The FBI says that the student who carried out a knife attack on the UC Merced campus in November was, in fact, a ‘self-radicalized’ Muslim. 

According to the FBI, 18-year old Faisal Mohammad had visited websites associated with the self-described Islamic State and viewed other extremist propaganda in the weeks leading up to the attack.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin is flatly rejecting the concept of city-sanctioned homeless encampments. 

The mayor is responding to that suggestion from a candidate seeking to replace her.

Earlier this week on Valley Public Radio, Fresno County Supervisor and mayoral candidate Henry Perea suggested that if elected, he would be open to the concept of city-sanctioned homeless encampments.

Yellowfeather Noriega / http://survivingfresno.blogspot.com/

Fresno mayoral candidate and current Fresno County Supervisor Henry R. Perea supports the idea of city sanctioned encampments for Fresno’s homeless population. 

Speaking on Valley Public Radio’s Valley Edition, Perea says city and county officials have been making progress in getting many homeless people into housing. But he adds the problem of people living on the streets has become more visible since the city closed down several illegal downtown encampments in 2013. Perea says legalized encampments should be an option. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Most valley residents didn’t know the name Bill Patnaude. But it’s likely that many if not most, have experienced his work. From the shimmering stainless steel of Fresno’s City Hall to the massive concrete forms of the Fresno State Madden Library and the university's student union, his works stand out as iconic buildings on the valley landscape. His legacy is in the minds of many who knew him, as he passed away last Friday at the age of 78.

The Dolores Huerta Foundation

Immigration advocates are starting a new outreach effort in Kern County to enroll undocumented children in Medi-Cal. This is the first year undocumented kids can enroll in the government-sponsored insurance program.

City of Fresno

Most people in Fresno known Lee Brand as the city council's resident policy guru. The rental property developer and manager has authored or co-authored over a dozen pieces of legislation during his seven year tenure at city hall, covering everything from negotiations with labor unions to city financial safeguards. 

Now Brand hopes to shift gears, from legislator to chief executive of California's fifth largest city. Brand says he's up for the challenge, both on both the policy and leadership sides of the job. 

https://twitter.com/NWSHanford

This past weekend’s El Nino caused storms brought needed rain to the region and as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports enough fell in the Valley to mark a milestone in California's drought. 

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

It’s the end of an era in downtown Fresno.

After years of hard fought battles over the fate of the Fulton Mall, demolition is underway. Dozens turned out for an official ground breaking on a project to pull out the six-block pedestrian walking mall in downtown Fresno and turn it back into a street.

Music blared and Fresno Fuego fans banged drums to celebrate what many see as a new chapter in the history of downtown Fresno. The vision of supporters is to revive the downtown corridor by opening up the corridor to vehicle traffic.

Leaders of the City of Fresno have officially broken ground on one of the biggest public utilities projects in city history.

Although trucks are already working on the 58-acre site in southeast Fresno, city leaders celebrated the start of the nearly $200 million project Wednesday by signing a section of the 6-foot diameter pipe that will carry water from the Kings River to the plant.

Once the surface water treatment plant is fully operational it is expected to deliver as much as 80-million gallons of drinking water a day to the city.

H. Spees campaign

The race to become Fresno's next mayor is starting to heat up. One of the three candidates vying for the seat is a relative political outsider, Fresno pastor and community activist H. Spees. After years of work with local non-profit groups, Spees says he now wants to lead California's fifth largest city. In this interview on Valley Public Radio's Valley Edition, Spees says he hopes to reduce crime and homelessness, while ensuring that the city re-invests in older parts of town. Join us in future weeks for similar conversations with fellow candidates Henry R.

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