Courtesy Kaweah Delta Health Care District.

Today is the deadline for residents in Visalia to have their ballots postmarked in a big vote that could determine the future of the Kaweah Delta Hospital. The hospital is asking the community to tax itself to support a new acute care wing. But the push has generated opposition in the community and from the head of a neighboring hospital.

First, a bit of background, state law requires that every hospital be hardened against earthquakes by 2030.

Courtesy Friends of Kaweah Delta

Residents of Visalia have just a few more days to decide if they will approve a bond known as Measure H for Kaweah Delta Hospital to build a new earthquake resistant acute care wing.

State law requires that every hospital to be hardened against earthquakes by 2030. As a result, the hospital is asking for more than $300 million in public bond to help pay for the hospital.

Kaweah is putting up over $200 million for the project, its statutory cap. The bond will be paid back in the form of a property tax increase.

Karana Hattersley-Drayton

The first week in May is Historic Preservation Week in Fresno, with a host of activities that celebrate the city’s architectural heritage.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

All across the country an iconic American symbol of success is finding it harder and harder to survive. Dozens of once crowded bustling shopping malls, are for lack of a better term, dying. Industry research predicts that 15% or more of malls could die in the next ten years. But one company thinks there is a path back to success for a Fresno Mall that is on life support.

Fresno Police say they have arrested the leadership of one of the city's most violent street gangs.

A 15-month investigation culminated Thursday morning with a highly coordinated set of raids.

At 7 O'clock, six simultaneous swat raids resulted in the arrest of 28 people including what the police department believes is the leadership of the Dog Pound Gang. 

The gang was allegedly making more than a million dollars a year, primarily in prostitution and racketeering, but is also connected to numerous shootings and murders.

Fresno leaders have officially announced the location and boundaries of a new central policing substation for the central part of town.

Stretching from Golden State Boulevard to First Street and Ashlan to Belmont, the new  Central Policing District will be headquartered at the Manchester Mall and will house 90-to-100 officers.

The district is being re-opened after recession-era budget cuts forced its closure.

Residents have been clamoring for a new substation, saying they have experienced an increase in crime.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Kerry Klein visits the Tulare County community of Matheny Tract that will soon have drinking water for the first time in 10 years. KVPR's Jeffrey Hess reports on what's going to happen to all the trees being torn out of Fresno's Fulton Mall. Also on the program we hear from Karen Humphrey, Fresno's First Woman Mayor. Humphrey will speak at the Fresno chapter of the League of Woman Voters 75th anniversary on May 18.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

Crews are currently hard at work cutting down many of the over 100 trees that line the Fulton Mall. They are being removed as part of the project to turn the mall back into a street. But some of the trees will find a new life.

Chainsaws reverberate down the concrete canyon of the Fulton Mall. Workers are cutting into the trunk of a 30 foot tall pine. They then push the smaller section of the tree to earth where it lands with a meaty thunk.

Courtsey of Mike Rhodes

Mike Rhodes has covered homelessness in Fresno for over a decade. He’s witnessed police taunt  homeless people, he’s called out government officials for their perspectives on those underserved and most recently he wrote a book combining those experiences.

Rhodes is a community activist and former editor of the Community Alliance newspaper. He joined Valley Edition Tuesday April 5 to talk about his book “Dispatches from the War Zone.” To listen to the interview click play above. 

Voters in California’s 31st Assembly district head to the polls tomorrow to vote in a special election to fill the seat for the rest of the year. But do voters even know its election day? Who actually turns out to vote could play a significant role in who winds up winning.

On a beautiful clear day in the town of Selma, in the heart of the 31st district, I stood in the town square to ask people this question: Do you know who is running in the special election?

Most reactions I got went something like this.