Fresno State

Fresno State

One of the biggest challenges facing Central California is in the area of education. The San Joaquin Valley routinely ranks at or near the bottom of the state when it comes to education attainment. Only 16 percent of adults in the valley have a bachelors degree. Compare that with the statewide number of 30 percent, or that of the Bay Area, where 41 percent of residents have a degree and the numbers become even more clear. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

The results are in from the U.S. News and World Report’s latest college rankings: Fresno universities are both up and down from last year.

On a list of top regional universities in the west, Fresno State fell ten spots from 36th to 46th place.  When looking at just public regional universities in the west, Fresno State ranked 11th, down 3 spots from last year—behind such schools as Cal Poly and 4 others in the California State University system.

Fresno State

Fresno State officials broke ground today on a $24 million agricultural and engineering research center.

The 30,000 square-foot facility will host labs and foster collaboration among students and faculty in the university’s agricultural, engineering and science and math colleges.

The Jordan Research Center aimed at solving agricultural challenges will be located on the corner of Barstow and Woodrow avenues.

Kerry Klein

One of Fresno State’s newest additions is a broad, brown, mulchy patch of land in front of the Science II building.  Gardening specialist Fortunato Garcia leads volunteers with shovels to a lumpy mound.

Garcia: All right, so we'll put one fertilizer tab here, one here, one here, one there...

Before long, this patch will be more than mulch—it’s the start of a waterwise demonstration garden.  Grounds supervisor Michael Frick points out the low-water bulbs and saplings that are being planted. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

A group of 18 students from schools across Fresno State were hooded with rainbow banners today in a first for Fresno State:  a lesbian, gay, bi, transgender and questioning graduation ceremony.

“I was really inspired because I noticed a lot of openly gay people, but we didn’t have a ceremony of our own, a reception of our own,” says Curtis Ortega with Fresno State’s United Student Pride Club. “We were kind of there as openly gay students, but I felt we needed our own expression and graduation ceremony.”

Last Thursday, Armenians throughout the world marked the somber occasion of the 99th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Around 1.5 million Armenians are estimated to have died in what is now known as the first genocide of the 21st century. 

  This week on FM89's Young Artists Spotlight we hear the President's Quintet of California State University Fresno. This scholarship woodwind ensemble is funded through the office of the university's President Joseph Castro and performs at many official campus events. The student members also receive additional support from the Fresno State Associated Students Inc. for tours, supplies and commissions. The group was founded in 1978, and is directed by Fresno State flute professor Dr. Teresa Beaman. In previous years, the ensemble has toured Europe, Asia and California.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

With just 10 days left before the Covered California enrollment deadline, farm labor activist Dolores Huerta took her message to students at Fresno State today. As FM89's Joe Moore reports, it's part of a last minute push to boost enrollment figures among Latinos and young people. 

Speaking to a class of students at Fresno State today, UFW co-founder Dolores Huerta invoked memories of the civil rights movement to help spur young Latinos to sign up for health insurance.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

As Congress continues to debate the farm bill, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack visited the Valley Tuesday to speak with local agriculture leaders. But he also called for Washington to do more when it comes to fighting wildfires.

He told a crowd of about 200 hundred people at Fresno State that passing a farm bill is essential to the San Joaquin Valley’s ag economy.

In the world of sports,  controversies over logos aren't unusual. The Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians have long been the subject of protests from Native American groups. Even high school teams aren't immune from such issues. But closer to home there’s another sort of debate over the logo for the sports teams from Fresno State - the Bulldog. In this case the debate isn’t about alleged racism, it’s about violence, and a street gang that has appropriated the logo for its own use.