education

Education
5:45 pm
Tue April 28, 2015

Valley Edition Interview: Janet Napolitano

UC President Janet Napolitano
Credit Janet Napolitano / DHS

UC President Janet Napolitano visited the San Joaquin Valley last week, including a stop at the Del Rey farm of organic peach grower David Mas Masumoto, where she met with students.  The visit was part of the UC's Global Food Initiative Fellowship program. Valley Public Radio's Jeffrey Hess spoke with the leader of the 10-campus system about the project and the challenges facing the UC, including the current debate over funding and a potential tuition hike. 

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Government & Politics
11:25 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Kern County Could Explore Privatizing Public Libraries

The Beale Memorial Library in downtown Bakersfield (file photo)
Credit Kern County Public Library

In Kern County, the state’s leader when it comes to oil production, the industry not only drives the local economy, it also helps drive the county’s general fund.

That’s because the county’s assessor puts a value on all of the oil that remains deep underground, and uses that figure when it comes time to collect property taxes. When the price of oil goes up, county revenues soar. But when the price of oil goes down, officials are left scrambling to cover the shortfall.

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Education
12:04 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

Education Funding Debate Begins At California Capitol

PTA members listen to a speaker Monday at the California State PTA Legislative Conference in Sacramento.
Credit Ben Adler / Capital Public Radio

California’s economy is on the rebound, but there’s little extra revenue to go around for the next state budget. As Ben Adler reports from Sacramento, there’s one area that will see a big increase in funding: it’s education. And that’s sparking a debate at the Capitol over how to spend the money.

Governor Jerry Brown and the Legislature’s majority Democrats agree on the need to raise per-pupil K-12 spending. The governor also wants to set aside money for adult education and career tech programs. Here’s H.D. Palmer with Brown’s Department of Finance:

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Education
1:20 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

"Talk, Read, Sing" Campaign Aims To Help Close The "Word Gap"

According to researchers at Rice University, children from high income families will experience hearing 30 million more words by age four than children of low income families. That’s from parents or others just reading or talking to young children, just describing the world around them. Researchers say this so-called “word gap” has big implications for brain development, educational achievement and long-term success.

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Valley Edition
1:10 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

On Valley Edition: State Parks, Talking Is Teaching, Death With Dignity Law, Bakersfield Sound

This week on Valley Edition, we look at the the future of California’s state parks system. After years of budget cuts and closures, how should this treasured part of the Golden State reinvent itself? We hear a special report.

We’ll also learn more about a new program called Talking Is Teaching that focuses on early childhood education, and something called the "word gap." That's the estimated 30 million fewer words that children from lower income families hear compared to those from upper income families. 

Talking Is Teaching segment guests: 

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Health
6:09 pm
Thu January 8, 2015

Fountains For Schools With Limited Water Access

file photo
Credit Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

More than 100 schools in California's Central Valley will receive water purification stations under a new program designed to give kids fresh water instead of sugary drinks with lunch. Capital Public Radio's Bob Moffitt reports.

The California Endowment created the pilot project called "Agua For All" and has joined with three regional groups in the state to identify schools that need water fountains or water filtration systems. 

Sarah Buck with the Rural Community Assistance Corporation says 120 schools will receive new fountains.

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Community
12:48 pm
Tue December 23, 2014

How To Build A Library In London. . . California

Rob Isquierdo has founded a group which aims to bring a public library to the small rural community of London in Tulare County
Credit Library For London Facebook

Rob Isquierdo is a man with an ambitious goal: to transform London. But he isn’t hoping to remake Trafalgar Square or give Big Ben a makeover. Instead, this high school English teacher is working to bring a library to London, CA a small unincorporated community in rural Tulare County.

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New Laws
10:55 am
Tue December 23, 2014

EpiPens To Be Required At California Schools

Credit Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

A California law takes effect January 1st that could expand the use of emergency treatment for kids who have allergic reactions in school. Ben Adler has more from Sacramento in the latest installment of our “new laws” series.

Mary Beth TeSelle never goes anywhere without an EpiPen, the anti-histamine auto-injector that can save a life during a potentially lethal allergic reaction. Her eight-year-old daughter has had a severe peanut allergy – since she was one year old:

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The Moral Is
4:18 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

Commentary: Society Needs To Reinforce Socialization Lessons From Schools

Professor Jacques Benninga
Credit Fresno State

America’s public schools have been called a laboratory for society.  In this edition of FM89’s commentary series The Moral Is, Jacques Benninga of Fresno State’s School of Education says that if that’s the case,  teachers have responsibilities that go far beyond promoting academic achievement.

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Election 2014
12:30 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Potential School District Reserve Cap Drives Debate Over Prop 2

Credit Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

This November, California voters will be asked to weigh in on Proposition 2 – the constitutional amendment that would create a state budget reserve. As Ben Adler reports from Sacramento, a little-known new law tied to Prop 2 has some school officials and parents upset.

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Education
5:16 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Two Weeks into School Year, Fresno Pacific President Resigns

Just two weeks after the start of the semester, the President of Fresno Pacific University has resigned.

In a statement released from the university, outgoing president Pete Menjares said that he and his wife will be moving back to Southern California to be closer to their families and to explore new opportunities.

In the same statement, Board Chair John Thiesen said that Menjares modeled diversity and unity in his two and a half years as university president. Menjares’ wife, Virginia, was also very active in the community and often made appearances with her husband.

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The Moral Is
11:01 am
Wed August 20, 2014

Commentary: Don't Look For Simplistic Solutions In Teacher Tenure Debate

Dr. Jacques Benninga
Credit Fresno State / Jacques Benninga

A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ruled in a case called Vergara vs. California that California education statues related to teacher tenure violate the equal protection laws of students, essentially depriving students of effective teachers by failing to remove ineffective teachers from classrooms.  In this week’s edition of The Moral Is, Fresno State education professor Dr. Jacques Benninga explores the teacher evaluation controversy and its reasonable implications.

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Education
4:09 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Marshall Tuck On Charter Schools, Vergara & Common Core

Marshall Tuck, candidate for Superintendent of Public Instruction
Credit Marshall Tuck

While school has been out for many kids since mid-May, this summer has been a busy time in the world of education. Big issues like teacher tenure and the new common core curriculum have kept education in the headlines across California.

This week on Valley Edition we talked about those issues and more with one of the men seeking to become California’s next Superintendent of Public Instruction, Marshall Tuck. He will face off against incumbent Tom Torlakson on the November ballot.

Interview highlights:

On charters vs. traditional public schools:

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Education
7:26 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Bilingual Education A Hot Topic In California, 16 Years After Prop 227

file photo
Credit Andrew Nixon

Back in the late 1990's, California voters passed Proposition 227, which imposed strict restrictions on bilingual education in California's public school classrooms.

Supporters of the effort said English immersion was the best way for English learners to succeed and assimilate into society. Critics said by teaching core subjects only in English, non-English speakers were at a disadvantage in the classroom.

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Voices of the Drought
6:47 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

California's Drought Triggers Drop In School Attendance

The district says it receives about 34-40 dollars a day per student.
Diana Aguilera

Schools on the east side of Fresno County are already feeling the impact of California’s ongoing drought.

Education officials from the Kings Canyon Unified District say they have seen a significant drop in attendance this year.

 Superintendent Juan Garza says families have been forced to relocate, taking their school aged children with them.

Come August of next school year, there may be even less kids having fun on the playground. 

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The Moral Is
12:44 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

Commentary: Common Core's Emphasis On Process Overlooks Important Content

Dr. Jacques Benninga

One of the latest political footballs in 2014 is in the world of education and specially the new curriculum that many states have adopted, including California. But beyond the concerns of those of some on the right that Common Core is a federal takeover of education, others are asking different questions. In this edition of Valley Public Radio's commentary series The Moral Is, Fresno State Education Professor  Jack Benninga says all the focus on learning process may leave some important gaps for our students. 

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Education
10:01 am
Thu April 17, 2014

New California Community College Scorecard Shows Affects of Recession

file photo
Credit Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

A new study says students at California’s Community Colleges are achieving many of their academic goals. But Community College officials say they’ll be recovering from the drastic cuts during the Great Recession for years to come. Capital Public Radio’s Max Pringle reports. 

Paul Feist with the California Community Colleges says there’s a lot to like in the findings of the “Student Success Scorecard.”

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Education
7:37 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

California Bill Would Put English-only Instruction Back Before Voters

file photo
Credit Andrew Nixon

A voter-approved  law that requires all California public school classes to be taught in English would go before voters again in 2016 under a bill now in the state legislature. Capital Public Radio’s Max Pringle reports.

Professor Patricia Gándara with the UCLA Civil Rights Project says a state-commissioned 2006 study proves that English-only instruction has few, if any, benefits.

Gándara: “The conclusion was that there had been no appreciable closing of the gaps between English learners and other students as a result of Prop. 227.” 

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Education
7:56 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

California Begins Testing New Student Assessments

Sacramento fourth grader Aanyah Jacobs practices California’s new student assessment.
Credit Katie Orr / Capital Public Radio

California is preparing to implement Common Core education standards. As part of that change, the state is replacing standardized tests with new “assessments” meant to better judge students’ knowledge. But, as Katie Orr reports from Sacramento, the state must first test the test.

In the media lab of an elementary school in Sacramento, fourth grader Aanyah Jacobs answers questions that pop up on a computer screen one at a time. She’s one of the more than three million California public school students testing out the state’s new assessment.

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Education
1:32 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Teachers, Students Rally To 'Save FFA' Amid Proposed Funding Changes

FFA students held at rally at the state Capitol last week to support funding for FFA programs
Credit Twitter / Asm. Susan Talamantes Eggman / https://twitter.com/AsmSusanEggman/

Go to a rural high school in Central California, and one of the most popular extra-curricular programs will be FFA – Future Farmers of America. But now the people who run those programs say their future is threatened in Governor Brown’s new budget.

It’s all part of a big change to the way school districts get their money from Sacramento – the Local Control Funding Formula. In general it’s been good news for schools up and down the valley, as it redirects more money to districts with high populations of low-income families, English learners and foster youth.

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