Community

Rebecca Plevin / Valley Public Radio

On Monday morning, Pastor Ray Polk comforted a man who was packing up everything he owned.

“You alright?” Polk asked. As the man expressed his pain and frustration, Polk replied, “I know, I know, I know, we got to keep going forward.”

Along H Street in Downtown Fresno, the homeless were stuffing their possessions into plastic bags and shopping carts, as city workers bulldozed and raked the debris left behind.

Yesterday, City of Fresno workers dismantled the third homeless encampment in three weeks. Overall, the effort has displaced a total of about 250 people.

Rebecca Plevin / Valley Public Radio

In 1948, a plane chartered by the U.S. Immigration Service crashed in Los Gatos Canyon, near Coalinga. Everyone on board died. Immediate news reports named the flight crew and an immigration officer, but referred to the passengers as “28 Mexican deportees.” The crash was immortalized by folk singer Woody Guthrie, who wrote a poem about the tragedy, and assigned symbolic names to the Mexican nationals. On Monday morning, those passengers were formally named and recognized.

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Ezra Romero / Valley Public Radio

It’s not every day that an ambassador from a foreign nation visits Fresno. But on Thursday the Indian ambassador to the United States paid a visit to Fresno State. 

Indian Ambassador to the United States Nirupama Rao visited Fresno for several reasons: to strengthen U.S. – India ties.

"Trade, business and investment ties between economies such as ours..."

The large Indian population in the San Joaquin Valley:

“I see so many friends from the Punjab region of India sitting amongst us..."

And because Rep. Jim Costa asked her to.

David Loftus / www.JamieOliver.com

The star of this year’s Big Fresno Fair may not be a musical act. Celebrity chef and social activist Jamie Oliver’s big rig teaching kitchen will roll into the fair in October.

Through a partnership between the Jamie Oliver Foundation and The California Endowment, Oliver’s mobile kitchen will also make stops throughout the San Joaquin Valley, from Kern County to Merced County, between September and March 2014.

AMOR - American Medical Overseas Relief

Right now in Afghanistan, infants who otherwise might die are getting a new chance at life at Ashfar Hospital in Kabul. The 24 bed neonatal department is the latest addition to the facility that first opened in 2009. It was constructed by a Fresno based non-profit organization called AMOR, which stands for American Medical Overseas Relief.  The NGO also runs the facility, which provides health care services for thousands of Afghans.

Ezra Romero / Valley Public Radio

Josie De La Fuente and her 30-year-old son live in a small two bedroom apartment in Southeast Fresno.

Just over a year ago, she joined the ranks of the thousands who turn to short term high interest loans to make ends meet.

She says taking out payday loan ensnared her.

“Imagine me getting a payday loan,” De La Fuente says. “Paying a 300 dollar loan and with all the bills that I have. You know the car payment, the apartment the rent and all that stuff. It’s not gonna help me and I’m not gonna have any money left with all of that.”

Ezra Romero / Valley Public Radio

Valley Public Radio reporters Rebecca Plevin and Ezra Romero teamed up to look at three ice cream shops that have remained popular and successful across generations. They identified three factors that have allowed these shops to stand the test of time.

Rebecca Plevin / Valley Public Radio

I’m a self-professed ice cream lover. I like visiting local scoop shops and purchasing locally produced ice cream.

Ten Speed Press

Without a doubt one of the best parts of summer in the San Joaquin Valley has to be fresh stonefruit from valley orchards. Ripe, juicy and delicious, the valley’s peaches, plums, apricots and nectarines are the envy of the rest of the country. And perhaps no one has done more to boost the profile of our local peaches, and in such a poetic way than our guest today– Del Rey organic farmer and writer David Mas Masumoto. Peaches from his 80 acre farm appear on menus of some of the world's finest restaurants, and his writing has won numerous awards.

Today we're introducing Homegrown, Valley Public Radio's book club about the Central Valley.

We will read books that shine a light on distinct issues, communities and experiences in the region. We'll air in-depth interviews with authors and panel discussions with local experts about the books. You can listen for the segments on Valley Edition and see online features at KVPR.org.

We also want to hear your questions and comments about the book. You can connect with us through Facebook, Twitter or e-mail, and our website, KVPR.org. Just search "Homegrown."

Ezra Romero / Valley Public Radio

Eating a ripe peach is a sensory delight, from the aroma of the fruit to the flavor of the nectar and texture of the skin. But what about the sound of eating the perfect peach?

We asked David Mas Masumoto, his wife Marcy and daughter Nikiko, the authors of the new book "The Perfect Peach" to talk about their new book on FM89's Valley Edition, and to share with our listeners one of the more memorable sounds of summer. You can hear the interview Tuesday at 9:00 AM on Valley Edition, but here's a short preview.

Come enjoy a paleta -- a Latin American ice pop -- with Valley Public Radio during Art Hop on June 6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The party is at La Reina de Michoacan, located at 720 E. Belmont Ave. in Fresno.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

For generations, residents of small towns in the San Joaquin Valley have gathered at Foster's Freeze. Sure, people love Foster's soft-serve ice cream, especially once it's dipped in chocolate. But why has this chain withstood the test of time in rural communities and continues to be the place people flock to to celebrate after the big football game or graduation night? To kick off our new series Summer Scoop, Valley Public Radio's Rebecca Plevin examines the role of this ice cream shop in the Valley's small towns.

Fresno State

A lot has happened in Central California since the last time Fresno State had a new president. On Tuesday, the California State University Board of Trustees  selected Hanford native Joseph Castro as the eighth president of Fresno State. He will replace the soon-to-retire John Welty, who has led the university since August of 1991. We thought we'd take a look back at how much Fresno has changed over the past 22 years.

1) The city grew. A lot.

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