Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

This week on Valley Writers Read we hear two stories:  Kathryn Johnstone reads “Two Surgeries, One Voice” and Ed Miller reads “Done Deal.”  The first story is about two operations – one went just fine, the other, very much awry.  The second story is about Nash, a sleazy criminal type, who wants to sell a car full of stolen goods over in Richmond, but barely survives a physical attack by the supposed buyers of the contraband.

This week on Valley Writers Read, author Burlee Vang reads his story “Polaroids of Tom.”  The story is about the author's younger brother Tom who was born with a fatal deformity.  He lived for only a week.   And then we learn that when his mother went to get a re-fill for the medicine she'd been taking, she was told  it was the wrong medicine.  So we're left to wonder if the medicine she'd been taking had anything to do with the baby's demise.

This week on Valley Writers Read, local author C.B. Mosher reads his story “Med School Culture Shock.”   The program deals with what it takes to become a licensed medical doctor.  Our author, who is a physician, describes the struggles he faced going to med school.  You have to pass many lecture and lab classes that familiarize you with medical concepts, practices and  procedures – not to mention residences in various hospitals.

This week on Valley Writers Read, local author Randy Sibley reads his story “Elegy.”  The story two American soldiers who are scrambling through the jungle when a sudden event changes their lives forever.

Heyday Books

California’s isn’t just home to internationally renowned gems like Yosemite, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks – it’s also a place that’s rich in its own human history. And while many stories, like the Gold Rush and Hetch Hetchy are well known, a new book seeks to document the “hidden history” of the Sierra. It’s called “Sierra Stories: Tales of Dreamers, Schemers, Bigots and Rogues” by author Gary Noy, a history professor at Rocklin College.

This time on Valley Writers Read, local author Craig Bernthal reads a story of his entitled "Perfection at Badaxe."  

Sam Comen

In 2009, Sam Comen, a photographer from Los Angeles, began a five year photo journey in Central California. He originally wanted to parallel the effects of the recession to the Great Depression. So he turned to the San Joaquin Valley for photo opportunities.

He landed in the rural west side community of Lost Hills and produced the series named after the community of 3,500, which has gained national attention since.

Heyday Books

This week on Valley Writers Read, Joel Pickford reads from his book “Soul Calling, a Photographic Journey Through the Hmong Diaspora.”  The author gives us a great deal of information about the Hmong community of Central California.  He tells us about their lives in prison camps after the Vietnam War, and how many escaped to Thailand and then came to America.

This week's program is all about the folks who came out west from America's dust bowl in the mid thirties.  It features several poems and a short story written by the leading writer of that group, Wilma Elizabeth McDaniel.  We actually get to hear her read one of her poems.  Most of the program is taken up by a short story of hers entitled “The Ketchup Bottle.”

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

The San Joaquin Valley has a rich architectural heritage. From gems like the Fresno Water Tower to Bakersfield’s Beale Memorial Clock Tower, to beautiful craftsman bungalows and mid-century masterpieces, those landmarks help give our communities their own unique identity.

And beginning this Saturday the City of Fresno will kick off a week-long celebration its architectural heritage – with a number of events taking place as part of “Historic Preservation Week”.