Valley Public Radio News

Hear local reports on the economy, government, education, health and the environment on Valley Public Radio during All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Valley Edition. 

FILE: Vote-by-mail ballots are sorted into their appropriate district after arriving at the Los Angeles County Registrar/Recorder building in Norwalk.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC

FILE: Vote-by-mail ballots are sorted into their appropriate district after arriving at the Los Angeles County Registrar/Recorder building in Norwalk. Maya Sugarman/KPCC

As the rest of the country turns to the national political conventions and vice presidential picks, in California, the final counts from the state's primary election results still await certification by the Secretary of State.

Secretary of State Alex Padilla has until Friday to sign off.

Fresno County Department of Public Health

Zika has finally appeared in Fresno County. An adult woman tested positive for the virus after traveling internationally and developing flu-like symptoms. Health officials won’t reveal where she traveled.

Fifty-five cases of Zika have been reported in California since January of last year, out of almost a thousand nationally. None are believed to have been transmitted locally, though some were spread through sexual contact.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Air quality is a tremendous problem in the San Joaquin Valley. Our air is consistently ranked the worst in the nation, alongside the Los Angeles area, and it’s been linked in Valley residents to immune problems, emergency room visits and even premature death. It’s an old problem, but local officials have put forth a bold new solution.

If it were winter, you could turn to the east from almost anywhere in the San Joaquin Valley and admire the snowy peaks of the Sierra Nevada mountains.

John Chacon / CA Department of Water Resources

Widespread concern in northeast Fresno about rusty water that can contain elevated levels of lead is the latest issue in the Fresno mayor's race, while the city continues to maintain that its water is safe to drink.

Speaking in separate events within minutes of each other, mayoral candidates Lee Brand and Henry Perea exchanged comments today about the city's response to the problem, both past and present. 

PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s achievements are many: Body builder. Movie star. Governator. Honorary Forest Ranger.

Yes, he was named an Honorary Forest Ranger by the federal government.

Federal and local officials have signed an agreement that could bring the Temperance Flat Dam project one step closer to reality.

On a windswept hill overlooking Millerton Lake, local and federal officials signed an agreement to begin a feasibility study of the project.

The study is necessary to draw down money from the state’s water bond as well as federal matching dollars for the multi-billion-dollar dam.

Fresno mayoral candidate Lee Brand has earned the endorsement of one H Spees, of his former rivals in the June primary. Spees came in third place behind both Brand and Fresno County Supervisor Henry Perea in the June 7th election.

Fresno mayoral candidate Lee Brand has earned the endorsement of one H Spees, of his former rivals in the June primary. Spees came in third place behind both Brand and Fresno County Supervisor Henry Perea in the June 7th election.

As Hillary Clinton makes headlines as the first female presumptive presidential nominee for a major party, there's an interesting contrast in local politics.

Among the 15 Los Angeles City Council members representing nearly 4 million residents, Nury Martinez is the only woman.

"I am embarrassed I have no explanation," Martinez said of the numbers. "People are in shock that [in] the second largest city in the country, we have this gender issue in Los Angeles."

The picture around the state isn’t much better when it comes to gender equality.

Michael Conner

The water crisis in Flint Michigan has led a lot of people across the country to ask what’s in their water.  Residents of Northeast Fresno are growing increasingly frustrated with their own water problem that’s been a decade in the making, one that they say is threatening their health.

When you walk into Mari Rose’s modest northeast Fresno home, you are greeted several friendly cats and given a warning ‘don’t drink the tap water’.

“There it is. Like a yellow…looks like pee,” Rose says.

Study: Water Windfall Beneath California's Central Valley

Jun 28, 2016
Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A new study finds California’s Central Valley has three times more water beneath it than previously estimated. As Capital Public Radio’s Amy Quinton reports, researchers say that doesn’t mean accessing the groundwater will be cheap or easy.

Researchers at Stanford University found what they call a “water windfall” deep beneath the Central Valley. Stanford Earth Science Professor Rob Jackson is the report’s co-author.

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