Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

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Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Ezra David Romero goes on a hunt for the perfect surfing wave. Later we are joined by Lois Henry, columnist with the Bakersfield Californian, to chat about the aftermath of the Erskine Fire that devastated Kern County mountain communities. Ending the program FM89's Ezra David Romero interviews US Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera on his second term. 

Inciweb / US Forest Service

In late June the Erskine Fire devastated communities around Lake Isabella in Kern County. Nearly 300 homes were destroyed in the fast moving blaze in communities like South Lake. Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom reached out to the Federal Emergency Management Agency for help. In late July, FEMA rejected the state's request for a major disaster declaration, and the federal help that accompanies it. That left many locals shocked and dismayed.

Kelly Slater Wave Company

Late last year a world famous surfer announced he created the perfect manmade wave. At this point no one knows exactly how he did it and the site where he built it isn’t open to the public. But Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero found that wave site in the most unlikely of places.

Eleven time world champion surfer Kelly Slater dropped a bomb last December when he released a video of an 8-foot manmade wave in what looks like an old ski pond nowhere near an ocean.  

Kerry Klein/KVPR

In the Sierra Nevada, it’s estimated that tens of millions of trees have died as a result of drought, many of which succumbed to infestations from bark beetles. As a result, we’ve been told our risk of wildfire is far higher than normal, but FM89’s Kerry Klein says the science doesn’t necessarily agree.

Valley Public Radio

  This week on Valley Edition we take another look at the correlation between body cameras and police involved shootings. We also hear from KVPR's Kerry Klein on bark beetle damage in the Sierra Nevada. Later in the program host Joe Moore leads a conversation about technology in Fresno and Kern Counties. We also hear from FM89's Ezra David Romero on how lawmakers think striped bass are eating up salmon in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Ending the  program we hear from Sarah Troop on  her latest book "Lindsay" looking at the history of the town. 

Bitwise Industries

 The Valley is known for growing things. But lately some of the region’s most notable crops haven’t been grown on a farm, they’ve been grown in front of a laptop, or an iPad – new and growing software companies. Now local technology leaders in both Kern and Fresno Counties are talking about how to strategically grow the local software industry to the next level. So how can tech jobs power the future economy of the valley? We spoke to three local tech experts about where the local industry is going:


The effort to preserve a healthy population of salmon in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a huge challenge. Those little salmon have a lot of factors working against them. Now a bill in the House of Representatives is trying to take on one of them, the striped bass.

The “Save Our Salmon Act” by Republican Jeff Denham of Turlock would update a 1992 environmental law that manages fish in the Delta. That law sought to increase the number of salmon, but it also set out to double the number of striped bass.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Oliver Baines has a unique perspective on the issue of Black Lives Matter and law enforcement. Currently the only African-American on the Fresno City Council, Baines also served around 12 years as an officer with the Fresno Police Department.  Speaking on Valley Public Radio’s Valley Edition Tuesday, Baines recalled his own experiences with racially biased policing, while pleading for calm and understanding in the wake of recent shootings and protests.  Baines said the often heated rhetoric from people on both sides of the issue serves to distract from the goal of racial reconciliation.

Kerry Klein / Valley Public Radio

It’s not every day that a musician from Fresno is honored by the National Endowment For the Arts with a prestigious national fellowship. But Bounxeung Synanonh one of the leading performers of the traditional Lao instrument the khaen recently received national recognition for his artistry from the group.


Dan Charles reports on agriculture for NPR. Over the past year he reported a series on farmworkers across the country. Recently he wrote a  post on NPR's food blog The Salt titled "Inside The Lives Of Farmworkers: Top 5 Lessons I Learned On The Ground." In this interview Valley Edition Host Joe Moore interviews Charles about this list and his reporting.