Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

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Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

Kerry Klein/KVPR

May was National Bike Month, and Fresno celebrated with group rides, bike clinics and a city-wide bike to work day. But in two high-profile incidents earlier this spring, one cyclist was killed and another seriously injured while riding in central Fresno. So is bicycling safe here?

Jeffrey Hess / Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Host Joe Moore leads a conversation about politics in California and nationwide. He is joined by Valley Public Radio Reporter Jeffrey Hess, Fresno Bee Reporter John Ellis and Political Analyst Jim Verros. The group talks presidential primaries, congressional races, local races and more.  

To listen to the interview click play above.

Ken Mettler Facebook

Bakersfield’s Kevin McCarthy might be the second most powerful elected Republican in the nation, but that doesn’t mean he’s getting through the 2016 election cycle without a primary challenge from within his own party.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition KVPR's Jeffrey Hess reports on what it's like for a commuter who travels to the Bay Area daily. Later in the program we chat with Ken Mettler from Kern County on why he is running for congress.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

The average commute in the Central Valley is just around 20 minutes. Now think of a long commute. Now longer. And longer. How about 6 times longer. That is what thousands of workers in the northern end of the valley are doing every day.

They are the target of high-speed rail advocates who think they can convince these mega-commuters to abandon their cars and move to Fresno or Merced to ride the train. But why are these workers making such a long commute in the first place? Reporter Jeffrey Hess shadowed one to experience the trip and ask that very question.

Kerry Klein/KVPR

Some Valley residents may remember Measure E, a bond passed in 2002 that funded repairs and improvements at community colleges in Fresno, Madera, Kings and Tulare Counties. Now, 14 years later, the community college district is asking for money—on an even bigger ballot measure.

Ezra David Romero

Kings County is known for farmed products like cotton and milk, as well as prisons and the Naval Air Station in Lemoore. The rural county is home to four cities and dozens of small places like Kettleman City on Interstate 5.  Now a Southern California group wants to build a brand new high tech town in this agricultural county.

Many people who visit Kings County don’t even realize they’re there.

http://alexott.org/

Clovis businessman Alex Ott would like to be the newest member of the Fresno County Board of Supervisors. Ott serves as the Executive Director of the California Apple Commission, The California Blueberry Commission, The California Olive Committee and the California Blueberry Association. On this week's Valley Edition Ott joins Host Joe Moore for a discussion on why thinks he should join the board. 

To listen to the interview click play above. 

This week on Valley Edition KVPR's Ezra David Romero reports from Kings County where a Southern California developer would like to build a high-tech city. FM89's Kerry Klein takes a look at Measure C and how the proposed bond may affect community colleges. Later in the program we hear from Alex Ott who would like to be Fresno County's newest addition to the Board of Supervisors. Ending the program VE Host Joe Moore leads a conversation about transportation and commuters.

Kerry Klein/KVPR

Residents of Bakersfield breathe some of the most polluted air in the nation, thanks to a confluence of vehicle exhaust, industrial operations, and stagnant valley air. In an effort to combat pollution, air quality advocates are now targeting a potential source of emissions that, at the moment, is not even operating.

Ride your bike along the Kern River just west of downtown Bakersfield, and you pass joggers and people walking dogs. To one side of the trail, families play Frisbee golf in the grass. To the other side, a symbol of Kern County’s economy looms silently.

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