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Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

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Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment.

On this Valley Edition, we look at the big problems facing the small Kern County city of Maricopa, we examine the controversial issue of racial profiling, and find out about an upcoming soul food festival at Fresno's African American Historical and Cultural Museum.

This week on Valley Edition we talk about the obesity epidemic that plauges so many in the Central Valley. We also learn about a new program designed to prevent obesity, called Healthy Eating Active Living, and talk about the issue of women's equality.

This week on Valley Edition we talk about the shortage of physicians in the rural communities of the Central Valley. We also look at how charter schools are working to provide innovation in education in the valley. We also have an in-depth interview with the newly named Poet Laureate of the United States, Fresno's Philip Levine.

Segment 1: Valley Economy
As world markets continue to try to make sense out of the US debt downgrade, and nationwide poor job creation numbers, what does it mean for Valley residents and the local economy. Host Juanita Stevenson talks with Fresno State business professor Dr. Bill Rice, and Cal State Bakersfield business professor Dr. John Emery about what the latest developments mean for local residents.

Segment 1: Disability access lawsuits hit local businesses
Over 20 years after the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, compliance with the law's requirement of equal access remains controversial. Recently, it's pitted business customers with business owners, resulting in dozens of lawsuits. Reporter Shellie Branco brings us this report on both sides of the access issue.

Segment 1: Valley Professionals Struggle to Find Work - Among the groups hit the hardest in the economic downturn are business professionals. From April 2010 to April 2011 the business and professional sectors in Fresno County lost 1,800 jobs. Host Juanita Stevenson reports on how some Valley professionals are looking to re-enter the workforce and having success finding work. Guests include Ginny Burdick, Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Community Hospitals of Central California; Cathy Frost, President, Bennett Frost Personnel Services and Dr.

Part 1: Obesity - We hear the term "obesity epidemic" often in the news these days. It's an issue that hits close to home. About 40 percent of Fresno County kids ages five to 19 are overweight or obese. And so are their parents. 57 percent of Fresno adults are overweight. On this edition of Quality of Life, reporter Lauren Whaley brings us the story of one Fresno teenager who suffers from obesity, and how getting sick changed his life - for the better.

Segment 1: Human Trafficking - On Monday the US State Department released a report that estimates that up to 100,000 people in the US are victims of human trafficking. They range from those working in forced labor, to women and children trapped in the world of sex trafficking. California is one of the top three states in the nation for human trafficking, according to Cal EMA. Joining us to talk about the extent of this problem in the San Joaquin Valley is Ronna L. Bright, from the group Central Valley Against Human Trafficking and the Central Valley Freedom Coalition.

Segment 1: California's long running budget battle entered a new chapter last week, when Governor Jerry Brown vetoed a budget sent to him by the Democratic controlled Legislature. On this edition of Quality of Life, we talk with Democrat Assembly member Henry T. Perea of Fresno, and Republican Assembly Leader Connie Conway of Tulare about what's next in the budget debate. We also get political analysis on the budget from Professor Jeff Cummins of Fresno State and Nathan W. Monroe of UC Merced.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Hanford’s 7th Avenue looks pretty much like any other busy street in a small San Joaquin Valley town. It’s a broad avenue populated with a haphazard array of muffler shops, fast food joints and gas stations. Yet less than half a block away exists another world, seemingly frozen in time, a cultural and historic artifact, built by Chinese immigrants who came to build the railroad starting in the 1870’s, a place called China Alley.

Segment 1 – County Jails & State Prisons - Last month the US Supreme Court ruled that California must reduce its prison population by 33,000 inmates by 2013, to improve inmate health care. And a new state law plans to shift much of that burden to county jails. We talk about the future of the state's corrections system and what it means for the Valley, with Kern County Sheriff Joel Youngblood, Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims and prisoner rights advocate Rebecca Evenson of the Prison Law Office.

Part I: High Speed Rail - As California's high speed rail system inches ever closer to breaking ground in 2012, criticism and opposition to the project is growing on a number of fronts. Valley farmers in Kings County have objected to the proposed alignment of the tracks through farms and dairies near Hanford. The State Senate voted last week to radically remake the High Speed Rail Authority and its board of directors. And in May, the non-partisan Legislative Analyst's Office issued a highly critical report of the project and its management.

Segment I: California State University Budget Cuts - California's publicly funded state university system, the CSU was once the envy of the nation, providing accessible and affordable higher education to millions of Californians. While the 23 campus system is still the largest in the country, the recent budget crisis has taken its toll. Under Governor Brown's latest "May Revise" budget, the system faces as much a $1 billion budget cut (36 percent) and a potential student fee increase of as much as 32 percent for the coming year. We ask Fresno State President Dr.

Part I: National Parks - Central California's National Parks are known worldwide and attract millions of visitors each year. In 2010, over 4 million people visited Yosemite National Park, just short of breaking the park's all-time record. But those visitors bring big city problems with them, from traffic jams, to pollution and safety concerns. This week on Quality of Life, we examine the difficult task of balancing public access with preservation of natural resources, in Yosemite and beyond.

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