Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

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Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

Obama campaign - YouTube

Former Senator Dean Florez says the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District isn't doing enough to protect the health of local residents. Last week Florez was appointed to the powerful California Air Resources Board (CARB) by California Senate leader Kevin de Leon.  

Florez: "I think there's a lot more they could be doing. I think they should move quicker. There's a lot more tools in their toolbox than there were 10 years ago. Anything I can do to make this board move quicker from the state level, I'm going to do."

https://www.facebook.com/Fresno-Community-Chorus-Master-Chorale-109889742395143/

The Fresno Community Chorus Master Chorale is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year with a special concert on March 6th titled “Like Streams We Gather.”

The concert at the Paul Shaghoian Concert Hall at Clovis North High School will feature a new work commissioned for the event by composer Joungmin Sur with text by Glad Ruiz. Director Anna Hamre joined us on Valley Edition to talk about leading this all-volunteer ensemble, which includes two members who have been with the group since it began. 

Ted Miller For Assembly

The race for the 31st Assembly District is shaping up to be one of the oddest in recent history. The seat which was formerly held by Fresno's Henry T. Perea was up this year. But at the end of 2015, Perea resigned to take a job with the pharmaceutical industry. That means there's a special election coming in April. With the combination of primaries and general elections, voters could be asked to weigh in on the race a total of four times in the next eight months.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

All across California fields of almond orchards are white and pink with blossoms and bees are actively pollinating the crop. But this story isn’t about the pollination process; it’s about how Californians actually say almond. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports there’s a long-running debate over what's the right way to pronounce the word.   

Jenny Holterman is an almond farmer in Kern County, but she doesn’t grow almonds.

“I farm am-ends,” Holterman says.

Nader Assemi

Right now, Central California’s rolling mountain foothills are painted in brilliant orange flowers. After years of drought, California poppies are back with a vengeance.

Standing on the side of highway 168, Sandy Kowallis uses a knife to spread sky blue oil paint on a fresh canvas to capture the beauty of two poppy covered hillsides.

“And that should make it even more interesting. Because if you put a complement next to each other, like orange and blue, each will intensify the other,” Kowallis said.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

The Central Valley is often considered as the epicenter of poverty in California. But one Fresno-based nonprofit thinks they have found a way to lift more families off the bottom of the economic ladder. The name of the program is the Fresno Bridge Academy.

Beningo Garza, who goes by Bennie, knows exactly what he wants in life.

“Because I want my own home. I want a big home for my wife and kids. I want a boat. I want things,” Garza said.

But recently the 36-year old came to a realization.  

“And you can’t get that one welfare.”

The Bakersfield Californian

This week on Valley Edition Joe Moore was joined by Bakersfield Californian Reporter Lois Henry. She talked about everything from her issues with Clovis' controversial dress code to groundwater to wastewater. To listen to the interview click play above. 

Freedmen's Bureau Project

Black History Month can be a hands on experience this year, thanks to an effort called the Freedmen's Bureau Project. It's a campaign to digitize and archive millions of records generated 150 years ago by the government agency tasked with helping former slaves begin their lives as free citizens. The group is seeking the help of volunteers to help clear through a backlog of documents so they can reach a goal to complete the project by June 19th, historically known as Juneteenth Day.

Courtesy of Emma Sledd / https://twitter.com/EmmaSledd

In January, teenage boys in the Central Valley city of Clovis showed up to school in dresses and girls wore pants as well as caps to hide their hair. They were protesting Clovis Unified's decision to keep it's controversial out-of-date dress code.

The dress code doesn't allow boys to wear earrings or to keep their hair below their earlobes. The proposed update would give the same standards for all students, but Clovis Unified School District trustees voted  4-3 against the policy update.  

Courtesy of Jurriaan Persyn / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/legalcode

Last year was a terrible season for the American pistachio industry. Warm temperatures and the lack of water resulted in a loss of almost half the crop, that’s around $1.4 billion less than 2014. This year the industry is hoping to recover, but as Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero reports growers across the country may have a different issue later this year, a problem that stems from the lifting of sanctions against Iran.

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