Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

Subscribe to our Valley Edition podcast...

Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

Henry R. Perea - Facebook

Northeast Fresno's water problem - corroded residential pipes that have resulted in rusty water that in some cases contains lead - isn't just an issue for the residents involved, it's now the latest issue in the 2016 mayor's race. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess explores whether building a medical school in the Valley is the answer to the region's doctor shortage. We also hear from Fresno County Supervisor Henry Perea about water problems in North Fresno and more. FM89's Ezra David Romero reports a story about how simple science could help the tomato industry. Later we hear from the organizer of the Black Lives Matter protest in Fresno earlier this month.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Air quality is a tremendous problem in the San Joaquin Valley. Our air is consistently ranked the worst in the nation, alongside the Los Angeles area, and it’s been linked in Valley residents to immune problems, emergency room visits and even premature death. It’s an old problem, but local officials have put forth a bold new solution.

If it were winter, you could turn to the east from almost anywhere in the San Joaquin Valley and admire the snowy peaks of the Sierra Nevada mountains.

flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/legalcode

Fresno has many hidden gems. One of them is tucked away on Winery Avenue not far from the Fresno Airport. It's called The Discovery Center. It's here on Friday nights during June, July and August  that a local professor leads what he calls Star Parties

John Chacon / CA Department of Water Resources

Widespread concern in northeast Fresno about rusty water that can contain elevated levels of lead is the latest issue in the Fresno mayor's race, while the city continues to maintain that its water is safe to drink.

Speaking in separate events within minutes of each other, mayoral candidates Lee Brand and Henry Perea exchanged comments today about the city's response to the problem, both past and present. 

U.S. Department of Agriculture / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

It's no secret here in Central California that many, if not most, people who work  in the fields in Valley agriculture are undocumented immigrants.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition KVPR's Kerry Klein reports on air quality in Central California. Fresno City Councilmember Lee Brand also joins the program to talk about water issues in Fresno and other topics.

Joe Moore - Valley Public Radio

Downtown Hanford is known for several things, like its historic town square, and ice cream sundaes at Superior Dairy. But one big part of the town's civic identity has been dark for two years - the historic Hanford Fox Theatre. Now the Fox is back, with a new ceiling and other features after structural problems closed the venerable landmark. Dan Humason joined us on Valley Edition to talk about the renovations, the theatre's history and some of the shows that are coming up at the venue. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Host Joe Moore interviews Kern County Fire Department PIO Tyler Townsend about the Erskine Fire. KVPR's Ezra David Romero also chimes in on what he witnessed while reporting on the blaze this week. We also hear from FM89's Jeffrey Hess about how some Fresnans are struggling with water issues. Later in the program Capital Public Radio's Amy Quinton reports on groundwater issues in Paso Robles.

Michael Conner

The water crisis in Flint Michigan has led a lot of people across the country to ask what’s in their water.  Residents of Northeast Fresno are growing increasingly frustrated with their own water problem that’s been a decade in the making, one that they say is threatening their health.

When you walk into Mari Rose’s modest northeast Fresno home, you are greeted several friendly cats and given a warning ‘don’t drink the tap water’.

“There it is. Like a yellow…looks like pee,” Rose says.

Pages