Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we talk about drought, a case about raisins, Yosemite and more. First, Capital Public Radio's Lesley McClurg reports on how drought is changing what's grown in California. Valley Public Radio's Diana Aguilera reports on a in special reading program in Fresno where children read to dogs.

Diana Aguilera / Valley Public Radio

Parents often wonder how they can get their children to read and at the same time have their kids enjoy doing so. As FM89’s Diana Aguilera reports, one library in Clovis is inspiring children to open up books with the help of a four legged friend.

“So who’s going to read first today? This is Atlas,” says Mary Catalano.

Catalano is at the Clovis Regional Library with her yellow Labrador named Atlas. The nine-year-old dog is laying on the ground surrounded by kids. 

Lance Johnson / Licensed under Creative Commons from Flickr user LanceJohnson http://www.flickr.com/photos/lancejohnson/5703722259/

Talk to most education leaders about the biggest challenges and opportunities in America’s public schools and the issue of so called STEM courses is sure to come up. It’s a fancy acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. According to the US Department of Education, job growth in STEM fields is projected to outpace the rest of the economy, in some areas like software and biomedicine, by more than double.

President Obama says STEM is a big education priority, in a speech to education leaders in 2010:

Ellie Koleen - elliekoleenphotography.com / Ampersand Ice Cream

The valley’s restaurant scene is bustling with new ventures all hoping to be the next big hit. The Fresno Bee's Bethany Clough recently joined us on Valley Edition to talk about new trends and restaurant openings in the area. From new gourmet ice cream in the Fresno High neighborhood to wine tasting and craft beer in Clovis, Bethany tells us what look for in local food trends, as well as one delicacy at a local restaurant that has people all over the valley talking.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we hear a special report from Valley Public Radio's Diana Aguilera on the startling HIV/AIDS numbers that have Fresno public health officials concerned. FM89's Ezra David Romero also talks with the nation's next poet laureate, the valley's own Juan Felipe Herrera about his career, what the honor means and get some poetry tips as well. 

Ezra David Romero

After the City of Fresno rejected a proposed bus ad about the lack of parks in South Fresno last week, the controversy over the issue  has only grown. The ad from the group Building Healthy Communities cited city data that shows North Fresno residents have over four times the amount of park space per capita as those who live south of Shaw Avenue. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

On today's show the debate over parks in Fresno rages on this week after city officials killed a planned bus ad for being too political after it sought to highlight the fact that North Fresno residents have four times the amount of parks as those who like south of Shaw Avenue. We'll also take a hike into the Sierra Nevada where reporter Ezra David Romero visits the North Fork Mono Tribe with their drought solution efforts.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess reports on how Fresno is leveraging big data to improve city functions. Later, Reporter Ezra David Romero goes on a Central Valley tour to find the ugly food that'll be found in a CSA-style home delivered box.

LA Times

California's drought isn't just a water shortage. It's also an event that has highlighted the political, cultural and economic divides that make up the Golden State in the 21st century.

The one common thread? Everyone wants to find someone to blame. Urban residents in San Francisco blame "greedy" San Joaquin Valley farmers. San Joaquin Valley farmers blame Bay Area "extreme" environmentalists. And Southern California groups blame political gridlock in Sacramento on such key issues as building more water storage and "fixing" the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta. 

paulapoundstone.com

Comedian Paula Poundstone is a regular guest on NPR's news quiz Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me. Now local audiences can see her perform live on stage at Fresno's historic Tower Theatre on Saturday May 30th. She joined us on Valley Edition to talk about her career, her housekeeper and her kindergarten teacher.

Ezra David Romero

This week on Valley Edition reporters from around the state report on drought including stories about swimming pools, drought friendly recipes and water conservation in Central California

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Forest managers throughout California say that thinning forests to a more natural state is a good way to reduce the severity of wildfires. Now scientists suggest that it also could offer help in saving water in the drought. 

Researchers at UC Merced think that thinning overgrown forests throughout the Sierra could result in as much as a million acre feet of extra water each year for the state. That’s enough water to fill Pine Flat Lake on the Kings River east of Fresno.

Office of Rep. David Valadao

This week we take a look at the world of politics with John Ellis of The Fresno Bee. We talk about John's recent article that suggests how a case currently before the U.S. Supreme Court regarding redistricting in Arizona could shake up local congressional districts, including the hotly contested seat in CA-21 currently held by David Valadao. We also talk about what candidates are already jockeying for position for Assembly and other races throughout the regions. 

This week on Valley Edition we look at how low oil prices are hurting Kern County's economy, and why veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan are turning to farming for a new career. We also get a report on why some DACA youth are having trouble renewing their work permits, and why raw food advocates have a problem with California almonds. Plus we talk politics with John Ellis of the Fresno Bee and about this weekend's Pirate Festival at Kearney Park with Diane Hull.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

On this week’s Valley Edition, we hear special reports on the controversy over farmers using treated wastewater from oil producers in Kern County, and efforts by Fresno police to build trust with young men of color.

Brooke Ashjian

Local schools have a lot on their plate, preparing students for life, a job and the possibility of a college education. But what about students who likely won't attend college? The answer used to be in vocational education classes, things like auto shop and wood shop. But increasingly those classes have disappeared from schools with the emphasis on standardized testing and college readiness.

Janet Napolitano / DHS

UC President Janet Napolitano visited the San Joaquin Valley last week, including a stop at the Del Rey farm of organic peach grower David Mas Masumoto, where she met with students.  The visit was part of the UC's Global Food Initiative Fellowship program. Valley Public Radio's Jeffrey Hess spoke with the leader of the 10-campus system about the project and the challenges facing the UC, including the current debate over funding and a potential tuition hike. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we talk about drought, elections and more. First KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess reports from Visalia where the city is looking to increase Hispanic representation with council districts. Also, KVPR's Ezra David Romero visits Tulare County where 60 percent of the state's dry residential wells are located

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our reporters tackle the issues of rights for farm workers and the decline of officer involved shootings in Fresno, as well as the first hackathon for agriculture

Columbia University

Acclaimed playwright Leslie Ayvazian wrote her humorous play "Nine Armenians" around 20 years ago about a young woman visiting her ancestral homeland for the first time. Now a new production of the play is in Fresno as part of the area's commemoration of the centennial of the Armenian genocide.

Ayvazian joined us on Valley Edition to talk about her thoughts on the play two decades after its premier, and how her attitudes about her culture and the Armenian genocide have evolved over the years.

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