Valley Edition

Tuesdays 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM, 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Valley Edition is a news magazine program dedicated to issues important to Central Valley residents, from health care and government, to education and the environment. Each week host Joe Moore presents a mix of feature reports, in-depth interviews, discussion and analysis. Join us Tuesday mornings at 9:00 AM for the live broadcast, or hear the rebroadcast of the program Tuesday nights at 7:00 PM. Follow us on Twitter @ValleyEdition.

Support for Valley Edition comes from The James Irvine FoundationThe California HealthCare Foundation, & The California Endowment and CalHumanities

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Just a few decades ago Fresno used to be the center of the American Fig Industry, with orchards stretching for thousands of acres. Now most of the trees planted by J.C. Forkner almost 100 years ago are gone and are replaced by homes and shopping centers.

Courtesty of Bakersfield College

Leading a major educational institution isn't an easy job. You've got to balance the needs of students and faculty with often competing interests of alumni, donors, trustees and the community at large.

That's certainly the case in Bakersfield where current Bakersfield College President Sonya Christian is at the center a controversy, regarding the future of her employment.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we hear report a story from Amy Quinton about how the US Forest Service is preventing its own scientists from talking about a study. Later VE Host Joe Moore interviews the Fresno Bee's John Ellis about national, state and local politics. 

Tulare County Symphony

The Tulare County Symphony is a vital part of the south valley's musical landscape. This year the orchestra has assembled a season featuring a varied selection of musical masterworks, guest soloists and new ideas that aim to bring new audiences to classical music. Musical director and conductor Bruce Kiesling joined us on Valley Edition to talk about their upcoming concert on October 3rd at the Visalia Fox Theatre, featuring music of Latin America, as well as the rest of the 2015/2016 season. 

Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

Last week was a rough one for California Governor Jerry Brown. For the first time in years, one of the his top legislative priorities suffered a defeat. SB350 would have cut the fuel usage of California vehicles in half over the next 15 years, but it faced stiff opposition from oil companies and moderate Democrats in the Assembly. Ultimately the measure did move forward but not until Brown and Senate President pro Tem Kevin de Leon removed the controversial fuels provision from the bill. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we are joined by Capital Public Radio's Capital Bureau Chief Ben Adler. He recaps this year's California legislative session. We also hear two stories about the sage grouse on how drought and fire are changing the bird's habitat and numbers.

This week on Valley Edition we are joined by Theodore Kuchar of the Fresno Philharmonic. Kuchar and Host Joe Moore talk about what to look forward to during the upcoming season with the Fresno Philharmonic. This season will celebrate 15 years of Kuchar with the organization. 

For more information on the season visit

Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

It’s the last week of the legislative session, and as lawmakers rush to send bills to Governor Brown, one valley politician is at the center of the state's biggest political tug-of-war. At issue is the greenhouse gas reduction bill SB 350. It would cut the state's petroleum use in cars by half over the next 15 years. It would also set a 2050 deadline to cut greenhouse gas emissions to 80 percent below 1990 levels.

Jeffrey Hess/KVPR

California’s four year drought has taken its toll on many trees in the valley, and now some are concerned it could also kill iconic trees that line Fresno’s boulevards. But is the city doing anything to keep the trees from succumbing to the harsh conditions?

If you drive down some of Fresno’s historic boulevards, such as Van Ness and Huntington, you will be cruising in the shade of tall trees.

But you can also see the stress that the drought has put on them in their brown leaves and dead branches.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

While the Rough Fire has now consumed over 100,000 acres of forest, a valiant effort from firefighters has thus far helped save the community of Hume Lake from the blaze.  FM89's Ezra David Romero takes us to the front lines to hear exactly how that happened. 

On a reporting trip two weeks ago in the Sierra Nevada I was told to evacuate the Hume Lake Christian Camps area as the Rough Fire burned a mile and half away from the camp. Smoke was thick and ash began to fall from the sky.