Talk of the Nation

Monday - Thursday 11:00 a.m. till 1:00 p.m.
Neil Conan

Each day, Talk of the Nation combines the award-winning resources of NPR News with the vital participation of listeners. The result is a spirited and productive exchange of knowledge and insight that delves deeply into the news and ideas of the day.

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Technology
10:52 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Surveying The Mobile Landscape, Post Patent Battle

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. If you have a smartphone or a tablet, you might want to pay attention to this story because last week a jury in California reached a verdict in a major patent battle case between electronics makers Apple and Samsung, a fight over the way their mobile devices worked and looked.

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Television
10:44 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Meet The Brains Behind "Bones"

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Up next, the brains behind "Bones." If you go to the beach this weekend and check out what the other sunbathers are reading, there's a good chance you'll come across someone deep into a Temperance Brennan crime novel. Brennan is a forensic anthropologist, the person the police call when they find human remains that are, well, past their prime, if we say.

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Space
10:39 am
Fri August 31, 2012

Gazing Up At A Double Sun

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

If you headed outside this Labor Day weekend, besides seeing that second blue moon of the month, just look up at the sky, would you believe that about half of those stars you see are actually two stars or more, the kind of double star system that's quite common? And this week, astronomers reported on the discovery of a planetary system orbiting such a binary star, two planets orbiting two suns. It's called Kepler-47 after the Kepler planet-hunting mission that spotted it.

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Space
10:36 am
Fri August 31, 2012

The World Remembers Neil Armstrong

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

On March 16, 1966, a potentially fatal problem gripped the Gemini 8 space capsule. Orbiting high above the Earth, it began spinning out of control. Spiraling towards unconsciousness and, perhaps, death, Neil Armstrong shut down the malfunctioning thrusters and wrestled Gemini back to stability. This was neither the first nor the last time that Neil Armstrong had escaped disaster. As an Naval pilot in Korea, he managed to guide a bullet-ridden aircraft, missing three feet of wing, back to friendly territory.

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Movies
11:38 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Summer Movies: Best Flicks About The News Biz

Hollywood tells many tales of the news business: the doe-eyed music reporter trying to get the big story in Almost Famous, the eager television reporter who has a lot to learn in Up Close and Personal, and the disgruntled news anchor who's fired from his job in Network.

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Religion
11:13 am
Thu August 30, 2012

Romney Campaign Focuses Spotlight On Mormons

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 12:13 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Like John Kennedy before him, Mitt Romney faces questions about his faith, as well as politics. And like Roman Catholics in 1960 and African-Americans in 2008, Mormons find themselves in an unaccustomed spotlight.

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Afghanistan
10:46 am
Thu August 30, 2012

'Manhunt' Author Reviews Navy SEAL's 'No Easy Day'

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 1:09 pm

Matt Bissonnette wrote No Easy Day under the pseudonym Mark Owen. He has drawn criticism for publishing details of the Osama bin Laden mission without Pentagon approval. Peter Bergen, author of Manhunt, says this account of the raid fits almost exactly with his understanding of the operation.

Middle East
10:46 am
Thu August 30, 2012

The Diplomatic Options For Dealing With Syria

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 11:44 am

The Syrian crisis continues to deepen as the conflict rages on. And pressure grows on the international community as refugees stream out. NPR foreign correspondent Kelly McEvers, former ambassador to Syria Edward Djerejian and Washington Post columnist David Ignatius discuss diplomatic options.

Election 2012
11:35 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Haley Barbour Assesses Romney's Chances

Now that Mitt Romney's officially wrapped up the Republican Party's nomination for president, he faces a political sprint to November. Former Mississippi governor and past party chair Haley Barbour talks about Romney, the Republican Party, and what lies ahead in the battle for the presidency.

Election 2012
11:09 am
Wed August 29, 2012

The Political Junkie Recaps The RNC So Far

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 11:28 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Hard rain from Isaac, hard truths from Chris Christie and hard knocks from Reince Priebus. It's Wednesday and time for a...

(SOUNDBITE OF KNOCKING)

CONAN: Edition of the political junkie.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

SENATOR BARRY GOLDWATER: Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.

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Election 2012
11:09 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Speechwriters Offer Advice To Romney For Thursday

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 11:31 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Law
11:09 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Peeping Toms' Voyeurism Scars Victims' Psyches

The term "Peeping Tom" comes from the story of Lady Godiva, who rode through town naked on horseback and asked residents not to look.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 30, 2012 10:30 am

In 1999, Debra Gwartney's 14-year-old daughter saw a man taking photos outside her window. Police found evidence that someone had climbed on a bucket to peer into that window numerous times. This was just the beginning of a long series of disturbing details that Gwartney and her daughters would learn about the Peeping Tom in their neighborhood.

While the act is reviled, some dismiss it as a relatively harmless, victimless crime. But there are victims, and the experience can have a lasting impact on them, haunting them long after the violation is over.

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From Our Listeners
11:09 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Letters: College Pressure And Transplant Helpers

NPR's Neal Conan reads listener comments about African-American men, stigma and mental illness, the pressures students feel to succeed in college, and what hospitals are doing to help transplant patients navigate the bureaucracy and fears they often face.

Politics
11:27 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Memorable Moments From Political Conventions Past

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Despite some interference as what is now Hurricane Isaac brush past, Republicans meet this week in Tampa for their national convention, Democrats will follow next week in Charlotte. Some advice to expect little more than carefully scripted political ads. But Political Junkie Ken Rudin argues the conventions have provided some of the great moments of American political history in the past and hopes to see a little bit more over the next couple of weeks.

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Around the Nation
11:18 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Preparing For Isaac While Remembering Katrina

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 1:27 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Isaac rose to hurricane strength this afternoon and should make landfall on the Gulf Coast sometime this evening. It's nowhere near as powerful as Katrina, but the storm will test systems erected since Katrina, both physical barriers like flood gates and seawalls, and administrative and political changes.

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Opinion
11:12 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Op-Ed: Iran's Foreign Policy Driven By Identity

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 11:21 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Education
11:12 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Should Anything Be Done To Integrate Schools?

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 11:25 am

Integration efforts, from busing children out of district to opening charter schools, have proven controversial. David Karp, author of Kids First and Sheryll Cashin, author of The Failures of Integration discuss why some schools are segregated and what, if anything, should be done about it.

Around the Nation
11:24 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Skies Less-Than Friendly When Packing A Cello

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 2:59 pm

Paul Katz bought two tickets — one for himself and one for his cello — in the cabin of a flight from Calgary to Los Angeles. But the captain told him his centuries-old cello had to fly as checked baggage. After an agonizing flight, Katz cried when the captain returned his cello, unharmed.

Remembrances
11:13 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Remembering 'Reluctant Hero' Neil Armstrong

Astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to walk on the moon, died Saturday. He was 82. Armstrong solidified his place in history on July 20, 1969 when he left the first human footprint on the surface of the moon. NPR's Neal Conan remembers the man his family called a "reluctant hero."

NPR Story
11:01 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Helping Recent Vets Find Meaning In New Jobs

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 11:11 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington.

When former Navy SEAL Eric Greitens returned to civilian life, he heard his fellow veterans asked the same question over and over: What do I do now? Part of the problem is the economy. Veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq face unemployment rates even higher than that in the general population. Part of it's mutual incomprehension. Vets say employers don't understand how the skills they learned in the military can translate.

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