Talk of the Nation

Monday - Thursday 11:00 a.m. till 1:00 p.m.
Neil Conan

Each day, Talk of the Nation combines the award-winning resources of NPR News with the vital participation of listeners. The result is a spirited and productive exchange of knowledge and insight that delves deeply into the news and ideas of the day.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a7d4e1c86ce20c8927d9|5182a7d0e1c86ce20c8927cc

Pages

National Security
1:26 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

Op-Ed: Maybe We Don't Need Military Academies

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

U.S. military academy like West Point are 19th century relics that infantilize their students, produce officers no better than those that emerge from ROTC and look increasingly outdated in comparison to their counterparts in other western democracies. That's all according to Bruce Fleming who's taught at the U.S. Naval Academy for the past 25 years. In a recent op-ed in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Fleming argues that these academies have lost sight of their goals, and he questions whether they should even exist anymore.

Read more
Presidential Race
11:27 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Speechwriters Compare The 2012 Stump Speeches

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 1:26 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

President Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney speak almost every day throughout the campaign season, sometimes two or three times a day. They deliver everything from commencement addresses to foreign policy analyses. But at rallies and union halls, high school auditoriums, at county fairs and a thousand other venues, they offer slight variations on a set of standard remarks known as the stump speech.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

Read more
Children's Health
11:24 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Disabled Kids Living Isolated Lives In Institutions

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 1:26 pm

Thousands of children with physical and mental disabilities live in institutions, isolated from their families and decades younger than other patients. The institutions are often better equipped to handle their medical needs, but can fall short when it comes to other aspects of the kids' lives.

National Security
11:08 am
Tue October 16, 2012

Cyberattacks Escalate Around The Globe

Originally published on Sun October 21, 2012 8:02 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Last month, customers of Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase and Wells Fargo and several other banks were unable to access their bank accounts. Hackers overwhelmed the sites with traffic that made them extremely slow or totally unresponsive. No funds were lost, but it was a nuisance.

Months earlier in Saudi Arabia, a virus named Shamoon spread through 30,000 of the computers of ARAMCO, the world's largest oil company, and erased file after file.

Read more
Remembrances
11:12 am
Mon October 15, 2012

'Killing Fields' Author Remembers Cambodian King

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:05 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Few stories in the 20th century are more tragic than the fate of Cambodia, a small, peaceful country on the sidelines of the war in Vietnam. Cambodia would be invaded by both sides, carpet-bombed by the United States, taken over by murderous Maoists, invaded again by the Vietnamese and left to wither for a decade by a grotesque, international impasse.

Read more
Law
10:49 am
Mon October 15, 2012

CIA's Ex-Con Code Thief Reflects On His Career

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:49 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
Politics
10:49 am
Mon October 15, 2012

How Much Power Does The President Really Have?

In three weeks, millions of Americans cast their vote for president in an election that both campaigns depict as a stark choice between two fundamentally different visions for the country. But the chief executive's power is limited in real ways, by Congress, foreign interests, and other players.

On Aging
10:49 am
Mon October 15, 2012

Taking The Car Keys Away From Older Drivers

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:24 am

For older drivers and their families, the conversation about giving up the car keys can be wrenching. Driving, for many, means independence and the transition to life without a car can be challenging, particularly for those who live alone or in areas with limited access to public transportation.

Technology
10:45 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Fifty Years Ago, A Bright Idea

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Fifty years ago this week, a team of researchers at General Electric created something new: a solid-state device that could emit visible red light without getting hot like a light bulb. Other groups have made light-emitting devices, but this was the first practical one that could make light that a person could see, rather than invisible infrared light.

Read more
Science
10:03 am
Fri October 12, 2012

2012 Nobel Prizes Recognize Pioneering Science

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 10:45 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. The 2012 Nobel Prizes were announced this week in Stockholm, and groundbreaking research on stem cells, cloning, cell receptors and quantum optics, yeah, claimed the honors this year. The physics prize was awarded to French physicist Serge Haroche and American David Wineland of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado.

Read more
NPR Story
9:03 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Feds To Debate Marijuana As Medicine

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 10:45 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Next Tuesday, marijuana will have its day in court because the United States Court of Appeals is set to hear arguments about the drug's therapeutic and medicinal effects. But some doctors, like one of my next guests, disagrees with the government's ban on medical use of marijuana, pointing to the drug's ability to suppress nausea, stimulate the appetite, relieve pain, improve sleep, even fight cancer cells, in test tubes at least.

Read more
NPR Story
9:03 am
Fri October 12, 2012

The Secret To Making Ultrastrong 'Gorilla Glass'

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 10:45 am

Corning's Gorilla Glass isn't totally unbreakable, as anyone who's dropped a smartphone knows. But it's twice as durable as regular glass--at half the thickness. How do they do it? Dave Velasquez, director of marketing and commercial operations for Gorilla Glass, talks about the innovations that make this ultrastrong, ultralight glass possible.

NPR Story
9:03 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Tracking The Ozone Hole, As It Waxes And Wanes

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 10:45 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. 21 years ago this week, way back in October of 1991 on the first-ever episode of SCIENCE FRIDAY, one of our show topics was the ozone hole, that bite out of the Earth's ozone layer caused by chemicals in our refrigerators, air conditioners, cans of hairspray. Our guest that day was the late Sherwood Rowland, who would go on to win the Nobel Prize for his work on the ozone hole.

Read more
Mental Health
11:32 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Bringing People Back From The Brink Of Suicide

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
Economy
11:26 am
Thu October 11, 2012

How We Got To The Edge Of The Fiscal Cliff

As the end of the year draws near, politicians and economists are again warning of the consequences of the "fiscal cliff." David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, sorts through the politics and numbers to explain how the government came to the precipice of the fiscal cliff.

Middle East
11:05 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Concerns Build Over Violence In Syria

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:22 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Columbus, Ohio, today. over the past week, the crisis in Syria deepened as the conflict spilled across the border with Turkey. While stray rounds from the civil war landed on Turkish soil from time to time, Ankara chose to look the other way until a mortar bomb struck a house last Friday and killed five civilians, including women and children.

Read more
Opinion
11:05 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Op-Ed: Women, Stop Trying To Be Perfect

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:54 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

No woman can have it all, words that may come as a surprise from the president of one of the country's premier women's colleges. In an article in Newsweek, Deborah Spar, president of Barnard, says women's liberation created incompatible expectations: the perfect wife and mother who breastfeeds and whips up sachertorte for the bake sale and puts in a 60-hour week in a high-power job. Women, she argues, need to acknowledge biological differences, stop striving for perfection and start recruiting others, men and women, to build happier lives.

Read more
History
11:30 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Ohio 'On The Front Line' In The War Of 1812

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
Law
11:25 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Programs Keep Inmates From Returning To Prison

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Columbus, Ohio. While numbers are down in some places, the prison population across the United States remains enormous and enormously expensive. Eventually, of course, almost all those men and women will be released. Ohio is among several states that have decided to put scarce resources into programs designed to reduce the chances that those ex-convicts will commit new crimes and go back behind bars.

Read more
Election 2012
11:18 am
Wed October 10, 2012

The Political Junkie's VP Debate Preview

NPR's Political Junkie Ken Rudin previews Thursday's vice presidential debate. WOSU news director Mike Thompson talks Ohio politics. And former Virginia governor Tim Kaine and former congressman Tom Davis talk about Kaine's U.S. Senate race against another former Virginia governor, George Allen.

Pages