Talk of the Nation

Monday - Thursday 11:00 a.m. till 1:00 p.m.
Neil Conan

Each day, Talk of the Nation combines the award-winning resources of NPR News with the vital participation of listeners. The result is a spirited and productive exchange of knowledge and insight that delves deeply into the news and ideas of the day.

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Science
10:03 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Searching For 'The Particle At The End Of The Universe'

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 12:02 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Why does stuff have mass, you know, that gives it weight? If you're a regular listener, you might recall that it has to do with how subatomic particles interact with something called the Higgs Field, right? Higgs boson, becoming more familiar? How do scientists know that? Well, it's theory. It's backed up by, in part, by the reported discovery of the Higgs Boson at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, back in July.

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NPR Story
9:01 am
Fri November 16, 2012

James Watson: The Double Helix and Beyond

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 12:02 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Well, luckily that we lost Dr. Crabtree that - I'm sorry that we did lose him, but fortunately for us we have our next guest with us here, it's Dr. James Watson, sitting right here with us. Welcome to the program.

JAMES WATSON: I'm glad to be back with you.

FLATOW: Well, let me begin our interview a little bit early. You are certainly not unknown, Watson and Crick, and you have also a new book out now called "The Double Helix," and it's got all kinds of annotations, and what's new about this version of the book?

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NPR Story
9:01 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Desktop Diaries: Temple Grandin

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 12:02 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Next up, Flora Lichtman is here, our multimedia editor, with our Video Pick of the Week.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: Hi, Flora. And it is super - we have a specials - we have special ones. This is a...

LICHTMAN: This is a special day for us.

FLATOW: ...special day.

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NPR Story
9:01 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Are We Getting Dumber? Maybe, Scientist Says

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 12:02 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. Turn on reality TV, and it may not be long before you ask yourself: Are we getting dumber? A new study may have some genetic answers to that question. Provocative research published this week in the journal Trends in Genetics suggests that human intelligence may have peaked thousands of years ago.

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Law
12:25 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Busted: What Happens When Shoplifters Get Caught?

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. As the holidays get underway, retailers go on high alert against shoplifters. Cases spike at this time of the year, and they're expected to raise losses for the year to nearly $35 billion.

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Around the Nation
11:16 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Sign Language: It's Not Just About The Hands

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 12:01 pm

After Superstorm Sandy, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's sign language interpreter became a pop culture phenomenon. Lydia Callis' energy and facial expressions drew wide attention and even a spoof on "Saturday Night Live." Some members of the deaf community took offense to some reactions.

Middle East
11:14 am
Thu November 15, 2012

As Syrian Rebels Unite, Intervention Options Increase

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Violence in Syria continues to escalate. Every day thousands of refugee flee into Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan, but for the first time in months, there's an opportunity to form a government in exile that could open room for diplomacy.

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Law
11:05 am
Thu November 15, 2012

BP Reaches Plea Agreement Over Gulf Oil Spill

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 12:17 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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NPR Story
10:45 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Out Of Bounds: High Schools Should Ban Football

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 11:39 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

There's been plenty of discussion about head injuries in professional football, new equipment, new lawsuits and new rules as well. Inevitably, the conversation came to include high schools, most prominently when a school board member in - near Philadelphia proposed to end the football program. There's also been, sometimes, angry pushback. Last month, the discussion opened again in Dover, New Hampshire.

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NPR Story
10:45 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Lessons From The 2012 Election

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 11:11 am

President Barack Obama takes questions from reporters at the White House today, in his first press conference since March. NPR's Ken Rudin and political strategists Vin Weber, a former Republican congressman, and Anna Greenberg, a democratic pollster, analyze the President's remarks.

NPR Story
10:45 am
Wed November 14, 2012

What Lies Ahead In The Same-Sex Marriage Debate

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 11:20 am

Maine, Maryland, and Washington passed same-sex marriage on the ballot in the 2012 election. Minnesotans struck down a proposed constitutional amendment that would define marriage as the union of a man and a woman. Now, people on both sides of the issue are reevaluating their strategies.

Sports
11:00 am
Tue November 13, 2012

Who's Hunting Now And Why?

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 12:44 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jacki Lyden in Washington, sitting in for Neal Conan. Stalking and killing one's prey is one of the world's oldest acts. In modern culture, hunting has been dominated by a stereotype of burly men in camouflage who view the pastime mostly as a sport. But a new, younger generation of hunters has started shooting not as a recreational activity but more as an ethical method of connecting with the source of their sustenance. And more women are entering the sport, changing the shape of the industry, literally.

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Religion
11:00 am
Tue November 13, 2012

Diwali: Celebrating The Festival Of Lights

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 12:44 pm

The five-day Hindu festival Diwali, honors the goddess of wealth, Lakshmi. Vasudha Narayanan, director of the Center for the Study of Hindu Traditions at the University of Florida, discusses the rituals and significance of the festival.

World
11:00 am
Tue November 13, 2012

Diplomatic Security: What Went Wrong In Benghazi

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 12:44 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jacki Lyden in Washington; Neal Conan is away. It's been just more than two months since the U.S. consulate in Benghazi was attacked. Four Americans died there, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens. Congressional committee hearings resume today, on the handling of the attack.

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NPR Story
12:03 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

'Who I Am': The Public And Private Pete Townshend

Legendary guitarist and songwriter Pete Townshend composed rock operas like Tommy and Quadrophenia, and helped define rock music for generations.
Ross Halfin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 12:31 pm

One of the most gifted rock guitarists of the last 50 years — and the main songwriter and creative force behind The Who — Pete Townshend spent decades touring the globe and writing rock operas like Tommy and Quadrophenia. He helped define rock 'n' roll for his generation and many to follow.

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Opinion
11:23 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Op-Ed: Petraeus Affair Teaches A Valuable Lesson

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 1:29 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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The Impact of War
11:17 am
Mon November 12, 2012

When A Child Comes Home From War

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 12:20 pm

Since 2001, more than 1.9 million sons and daughters have been deployed to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan. For many young veterans, homecoming can be a time of mixed emotions and changing family dynamics after a life-changing experience at war.

Environment
11:01 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Despite Risk, Many Residents Can't Resist The Water

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 6:43 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jacki Lyden, in Washington. Neal Conan is away. Come hell or high water, these days, it can feel like the same thing. More than half of Americans live within 50 miles of the coast, and still more live by rivers and lakes. What is this primal human pull to the water's edge?

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Research News
10:03 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Hurricane Sandy Claims Thousands of NYU Lab Mice

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow this week. Last week, when Hurricane Sandy sent a surge of salty water into cities and towns up and down the East Coast, among the casualties were thousands of research subjects: lab mice. A building at New York University's Medical Center flooded, and thousands of mice and rats that were being used to study cancer, heart disease and all kinds of other medical disorders died.

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NPR Story
9:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Oliver Sacks: Hallucinations

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 10:03 am

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. In his new book "Hallucinations," Oliver Sacks writes that you see with your brain, not with your eyes. And his book suggests our brains can play some bizarre tricks on is. Dr. Sacks describes a musician who sees intricate but unplayable sheet music superimposed on his field of vision.

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