The Moral Is

Sundays at 3:55 PM; Wednesdays at 7:55 PM

Our daily lives and the lives of those who influence events are confronted with problems and conflicts and with choices and resolutions. These are grist for moral discussions, and how we address those issues influences the course of events in our lives and in the world. The Moral Is presents contemporary issues and opinion in a thought provoking context, through commentaries written and read by faculty members from California State University Fresno. It is produced in partnership with the Bonner Center for Character Education at Fresno State. The Moral Is airs Sundays (at 3:55 pm) and Wednesdays (at 7:55 pm). The commentaries can also be heard during the program Valley Edition.

Do you deserve to be happy?  In this segment of FM89's commentary series The Moral Is, Fresno State philosophy professor Dr. Andrew Fiala discusses the pursuit of happiness and the question of what we ought to do to be worthy of happiness.

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With the issue of comprehensive immigration reform once again stalled in the U.S. House of Representatives, the nation's deep divide on immigration remains vivid. In this edition of FM89's commentary series  The Moral Is, Fresno State Communication Professor Diane Blair argues that it is our own paradoxical and spiteful rhetoric about immigrants and immigration that is paralyzing politicians and the nation when it comes to reasonable reform.

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Commentary: Time For Bailouts To End

Feb 6, 2014
Fresno State

Taxpayers have already bailed out banks during the past several years and now one of them wants to get bailed out again. In this edition of Valley Public Radio’s commentary series The Moral Is, Ida Jones, professor of Business Law at Fresno State, argues that taxpayers should not have to continue to bail out financial institutions that speculated in mortgage securities and then lost when the real estate market collapsed.

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Madhusudan Katti

Despite enduring a lifetime of oppression, Nelson Mandela transformed his nation by seeking reconciliation with his oppressors rather than retribution. In this week’s edition of The Moral Is, Fresno State Biology Professor Madhusudan Katti wonders whether the power of reconciliation as a moral principle might save us all from the damage humanity is inflicting on our planet and ourselves.

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With the passing of Nelson Mandela last month, we lost one of the strongest needles in humanity’s moral compass.

Commentary: Schooling in the 21st Century

Nov 19, 2013

Schooling in the 21st century will look quite different than that of the past.  In this edition of Valley Public Radio’s The Moral Is, Kaye Cummings, Executive Director of the Bonner Family Foundation, explores the changes in curriculum and teachers’ delivery that must occur to meet the needs of the students and the society of the 21st century.

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Madhusudan Katti

America was once the scientific “City on the Hill”, investing its resources and its capital to improve the world’s physical, social and cultural infrastructure.  But in the 21st century America seems to have lost its moral compass in this regard.  In this week’s edition of The Moral Is, Fresno State Biology Professor Madhusudan Katti calls on all Americans to rekindle the commitment that for so long maintained America’s scientific dominance that served humanity so well.

This is a peculiar moment to be a scientist in America.

Fresno State

Is it more efficient for local and state governments to privatize provision of government services to save money? In this edition of Valley Public Radio’s commentary series The Moral Is Ida Jones, Professor of Business Law at Fresno State argues that there are hidden costs to privatization. Using for-profit prisons as an example, she connects increased privatization to higher long-term social and financial costs.

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Privatization is the buzzword that represents tax-revenue strapped governments transferring services to the private sector to save money. But does it?

When President Obama asked Congress to make its own decision on invention in the Syrian crisis, it marked a break from other recent military actions, where the commander in chief didn’t seek such approval from the legislative branch.

Madhusudan Katti

As global concerns about climate change continue to grow, could it be that our basic human nature is part of the problem? In this segment of FM89’s series of commentaries known as The Moral Is, Fresno State Biology Professor Madhusudan Katti suggests that our planet Earth will not accommodate our human frailties as much as we must adapt to its changing dynamics.

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We humans are aggressively territorial, willing to defend what’s ours against all comers. By no means the only territorial species, we are surely the most extreme.

Over the past several weeks, we’ve watched as Edward Snowden, the NSA analyst accused of releasing classified government information, escaped to Russia in an attempt to find asylum.  Now that his immediate future has been settled, Fresno State professor Jacques Benninga explores the moral implications of his actions in this segment of FM89’s commentary series The Moral Is.

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