Valley Public Radio - Live Audio

In the Mode

Sundays at noon

Every week on In the Mode, listeners travel back in time to the Renaissance and medieval eras to hear early music performed on with attention to authenticity. Host and producer of In the Mode, Kristina Herrick, has been involved in the performance and research of "ancient music" since the 1980s, and each week  shares with listeners some of the most exciting recorded performances of early music, often including folk and modern music as it can be related to the ancient forms.

Next time on In the Mode, music from the court of Maximilian II of Hapsburg who was Holy Roman Emperor from 1564 to 1576. Music was an essential part of life at court, lots of music was needed for many special occasions. Ferdinand established a chapel for his children and by 1551, Maximilian’s chapel had its own musical establishment, Jacobus Vaet was Kapellmeister. We’ll hear his music performed by Cinquecento. 

In the last program of the series featuring Trio Medieval, the women investigate their Scandinavian roots, with some medieval and later folk songs.  They are joined by percussionist Birger Mistereggen, a specialist in the rare Norwegian folk-drum tradition. Some of the medieval ballads have survived mostly because of the stories they tell. One of the singers says—“none of us grew up as a folk musicians, but we were surrounded by folk music.  These are songs we have known since childhood”. 

CD Title: Trio Mediaeval Folk Songs

We’ll hear modern music on the usually early music program In the Mode next time. Again featuring Trio Mediaeval, singing a Mass written specifically for the 3 women in 2002 by Korean-born composer Sungji Hong. In this Missa Lumen de Lumine she uses the fundamental structure of the Mass Ordinary with some early chants hidden in the contemporary music. 

Trio Medieval with English and French music of the 13th and 14th centuries next time on In the Mode, some very early music, the earliest that we have a composers name for, Perotin of the Notre Dame school, he flourished around 1200. Also, a combination of English and Latin in a 13th century motet from England, Dou Way Robin/ Sancta Mater an arrangement by the trio.

In the Mode will continue to feature "Trio Mediaeval", one Swedish and two Norwegian women, again with a mix of medieval and modern music. The early music is by 14th century English composer Leonel Power, then Kyrie, composed in 2002 by Ukranian composer Oleh Harkavyy, specifically for Trio Mediaeval.  

The next few programs of In the Mode will feature Trio Mediaeval.  Next Sunday the Scandinavian women sing some very old-- and some very new sacred music that was written for them-- 14th century polyphony found in the great Tournai Cathedral  in Belgium and music composed 600 years later by Ivan Moody.  

“Ave Maris Stella”, Hail, Star of the sea is a plainsong Vespers hymn to Mary. It was especially popular in the Middle Ages and settings of the text have been made by many other composers. Seems we are unsure of who created the original, the text is found in 9th century manuscripts. Next time on In the Mode we’ll hear several settings of Ave Maris Stella.  

Next time on In the Mode we’ll hear music with roots back to the sibyls of antiquity. The Hilliard Ensemble sings Prophetiae Sibyllarum by Orlando di Lasso.  Words that are attributed to the sibyls, supposedly telling of the coming of Christ, but are actually by early Christians. We don’t really know what the sibyls said, we only know that they gave doom-laden predictions in Greek verse. 

Vocal music by Henry Purcell next time on In the Mode.  He lived only 36 years, but wrote a lot of incredible diverse music, considered the most original composer of his day.  In his short time he worked in Westminster for 3 different kings, became organist at Westminster Abbey when he was 20.  He died in 1695 and was buried beneath the organ there. I’m Kristina Herrick, please join me for some beautiful vocal music by Henry Purcell.

Vocal music by Henry Purcell next time on in the Mode.  He lived only 36 years, but wrote a lot of incredible diverse music, considered the most original composer of his day.  In his short time he worked in Westminster for 3 different kings, became organist at Westminster Abbey when he was 20.  He died in 1695 and was buried beneath the organ there. I’m Kristina Herrick, please join me for some beautiful vocal music by Henry Purcell.

Sweelinck, his sources and his influence is the name of the collection of organ music that is featured next time on In the Mode. Incredibly, no keyboard manuscripts of Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck survive, but the good news is that the many young German organists who visited Amsterdam to study with Sweelinck held such a high opinion of their master’s work, that it was spread all over Europe by them. We’ll hear organist Bernard Winsemius perform. CD TITLE: Psalmi ad Vesperas (1694) PERFORMER: Houston Chamber Choir CD: MSR 1437

On this edition of In the Mode, we will hear music by Bolognese composer Giovanni Paolo Colonna. He lived from 1637 to 1695 and was maestro de cappella at the church of San Petronio in Bologna for the last 20 years of his life where he wrote masses, motets and psalms for performance there, he was also an organist and organ builder.  We’ll hear the Houston Chamber Choir and orchestra perform his setting of psalm 126 Nisi Dominus and a Magnificat Robert Simpson conducts. 

CD TITLE: Psalmi ad Vesperas (1694) PERFORMER: Houston Chamber Choir CD: MSR 1437 

The Dufay Collective

Cancionero, Music for the Spanish Court 1470-1520 is the name of the collection of music recorded by the ensemble The Dufay Collective and next time on In the Mode we’ll hear villancicos, romances, canciones,  dances and and some foreign songs too including some Italian frottola, music that would have been heard at the court of Ferdinand and Isabella.  I’m Kristina Herrick, hoping you’ll come to medieval Spain with me, Sunday at 12:06. CD Title: Cancionero Performer: The Dufay Collective CD label: Avie 0005

Next time on  In the Mode music by Philippe Verdelot, performed by the English Ensemble Alamire, led by David Skinner. Verdelot was an important composer of Italian madrigals in the early 16th century, He was French, but held several important posts in Italy. In the mid 1520s a set of part-books were assembled in Florence, probably under Verdelot's supervision, for the court of Henry VIII. We’ll hear the first recording of some of those madrigals. CD Title: Philippe Verdelot, Madrigals for a Tudor KingPerformer: AlamireCD label: OBSIDIAN 703   

This week the English ensemble “Alamire”, directed by David Skinner will again be featured on In the Mode, this time with music by Josquin. Skinner writes that Josquin Desprez is widely recognized as the greatest of the Renaissance master musicians who became and iconic figure whose art captivated musicians and scholars for centuries. We’ll hear some of his earliest chansons and motets.

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